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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 08:37 AM
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What a neat truck - odd looking arrangement for the steering box and input shaft. And that Caddy... Goodness that's nice. You say the guy bought cars for "his railroad"? Must be nice...

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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 06:11 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by BearGFR View Post
What a neat truck - odd looking arrangement for the steering box and input shaft. And that Caddy... Goodness that's nice. You say the guy bought cars for "his railroad"? Must be nice...

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Yep, the guy is my brother. He wants to put a vinyl wrap on the outside of the box to advertise his dinner train & other venues he has with it. We even talked about putting a hot dog cart in the back and selling hot dogs out of it at his commercial railyard at Quonset Point, RI. There are about 10,000 employees within the business park area. He would sell the hot dogs during lunch hours and then people would see the advertisement wrap for his other tourist train.

The Caddy is currently getting the radiator recored. Car has 32,000 miles, but the radiator was plugged with junk and it ran hot. The radiator is specific to the '57 so he could not get an aluminum one. $800 for the recore.

The '73 Plymouth just got a factory 4-speed conversion - everything new and an original 833 Mopar 4-speed that was rebuilt. Pistol grip shifter of course. He deleted the console and just went with a boot. Say it seems faster over the automatic and is a blast to drive. When I take my vacation, I'll take it for a spin.
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 09:11 AM Thread Starter
 
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Had to rebuild the horn. It is of the old "trumpet" style. The original 6-volt guts are seen on the left of the horn body - they were shot. In the upper right is an Autozone 12-volt plastic bodied replacement horn. I simply trimmed the plastic body of the horn and fitted it into the rounded back cover of the trumpet horn. Soldered the original 6-volt electrical end to the 12-volt horn so it connects like factory on the outside of the housing. The horn button on the steering wheel did not work, so had to tweak it as well so it would work. The truck now has a functioning horn.

Had to modify the steering column support. Shortened and welded it together as I had rotated the steering box slightly upward to give the steering column a little more angle up and thus move the steering wheel a little further away from the driver so you could actually get underneath it to sit down. I barely could squeeze under the steering wheel to get into the original seat - and I'm not a heavy set guy. Must have had a tiny framed guy who drove these things. Also installed the new seat. Its from Tractor Supply. Mounted it on a '98 Ford Ranger seat track so it slides. Then fabricated & mounted the track on a floor pedestal to get it the right height. It has hinges in front so the seat can be tilted forward. Why? The gas filler neck and tank is directly under the seat, so you have to tilt it to add gas.

Got the wipers almost done. The wiper pivots going at the bottom of the windshield are VW's. I then mated VW wiper arm bases with Speedway Automotive wiper arms so I could use their shorter 10" wiper blades. Fabricated a mount inside the cab to mount a Speedway Automotive electric wiper motor. It is all hooked up and the motor works. Mocked up one wiper arm rod from the motor to the wiper so as to get the correct length I needed. Then I purchased a carb linkage parts, heim joints and threaded rod, from Speedway and just have to cut and fit them. Then the wipers will be good to go. Not fast in their movement, but legal enough to pass inspection. Also don't expect the truck to see much rain if any.

Tore the entire nose apart. 70 year old bolts do not unbolt. Liquid heat was the answer. The grille is really rough and my brother actually has a back-up grille which he is shipping to me to see if it is better and usable. Got a lot of work ahead of me with regards to the body work. May bring the nose to my place of work and let our painter do the job. It would be faster than me doing it and my brother can afford to have it done. Then all I would have to do is reassemble it and install the nose section.
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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
 
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The glove box insert was gone and the glove box door was beat up. I found that a $1.00 plastic tool box was the correct size I needed to make the insert! I fitted it and even added a USB/lighter plug on the side so you can plug in a car phone charger. I added a key lock to the glove box door and a pull knob as well.
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
 
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Had to rebuild the inside heater/blower assembly. The truck did not have its original heater with its door style vents, so my brother purchased a used heater that was the factory unit. The blower motor is 6-volts and has a forward & reverse rotation. Forward allows the fan to blow heat through the heater core to heat the cab interior. Reverse sends the heat up the vent tubes used for defrosting the windshield. But seeing this was a custom built body on the KB5 chassis, the way the windshield area is fabricated with the box body it has no provisions for windshield defrosting vents - and this is why a different heater non-factory was used & fitted to the truck.

I purchased a 12volt CCW rotating motor to spin the heater fan so it would blow through the heater core to heat the cab. Did not need it to reverse because it would not be needed for windshield heat. But, the original heater housing with its opening doors that regulate heat flow and the original International logo were the main reasons the original type heater was installed. Cleaned everything up by disassembling the heater & removing all the rust and painting. Kept the original heater box original for its patina. The original holes for the heater core lines and bolts were already in the firewall, so it dropped right in.

I also added a water filter. This is on the backside of the heater and mounted on the firewall. This can help to trap any sediment or scale rust that may be floating around in the engine or flake off in the future. These are common on big diesel trucks, so wanted to add one to the old truck. BTW, the cooling system in this truck uses a 0-pressure radiator cap so there is no pressure built up in the cooling system. If there was any pressure, it would probably blow out the flat disc style freeze plugs used in the engine block. The replacement aluminum radiator had a 16-pound cap! Good thing I caught it.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-11-2019, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
 
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Still moving forward on the KB5. Finally fab'd up a lower radiator hose. The hose is unique with several tight bends and there is not a lot of room where it goes - although you might think so with the nose off the truck. Of course you can't find one preformed, so I had to make one up.

I read that the original hose was a 2-piece deal that was joined together. With the bends of this hose, it made sense. So I began by using 2 pieces of welding wire and shaping them to the contour I needed. One from the lower radiator outlet and curving up towards the water pump outlet. Then I did the reverse, one from the water outlet that had a slight curve and met up with the lower shaped wire about mid way as that was where I wanted to make my connection joint. Then I trimmed the lower shaped wire so it too met the upper wire in the middle.

With those 2 formed wires as my initial pattern, I found an online NAPA molded radiator catalog in PDF. The outlet size on the radiator is 2 1/4". The outlet on the water pump is 1 3/4". I found a molded lower hose that looked to have a section of the hose that I could use. The big end was 2 1/4" with a smaller 2" end. Found a water pump hose which had a molded section that looked to be what I wanted, having 1.71" outlets on each end. The idea was not to use the hose as formed, but to use a section of each that appeared to match my formed wire shapes. So I ordered the hoses.

Next I had to find something to join the two pieces once I cut the hoses down to make up the upper & lower hose sections I needed. My union had to have a 2" OD to slide into the end of lower hose section and a 1.75" OD to slide into the end of the upper hose section. Simple enough, an exhaust reducer. Problem is that most are steel and of course will rust out over time being used for the cooling system. I needed one in stainless steel. Gotta love Ebay, because they had SS exhaust reducers, but not in my size. I emailed the seller who said he could get me one......from the warehouse in China. Works for me and it took about 3 weeks to arrive. Perfect.

All I had to do now was carefully cut up the molded hose sections to approximate the wire shapes I had made. Measure twice, cut once. I got them "roughed" out, but knew I had to do some final trimming. Trimming just small amounts on each hose end as needed and making sure I retained the correct bends I needed, I got the two hose to line up and meet in the middle - which was based off of the water pump hose as it was more of a straight length.

I then had to cut down the 4 3/4" SS reducer to 2" by taking a little off each end. The 2" OD end fit perfect into the lower hose 2" ID. The 1 3/4" OD end did not fit well into the 1.71" ID end of the upper hose. So I cut 8 slots evenly spaced into the end of the reducer with my die grinder/wheel and tapped them in a little to collapse the end smaller. Still very snug, so boiled up some water and stuck the hose in it for a couple minutes. Put a little dish soap on the SS reducer, then slipped the hose right over the end with little problem.

All that was left was to install the hose, adjust it a little by twisting, then add my hose clamps. I also replaced the flex hose used on the top radiator outlet with a molded hose that looks 100% better. Then I filled the radiator up. Success! No leaks. This was a real project to accomplish only because nothing was in stock and I had to wait on parts to arrive. So a 1 day job took about 1 month to get done! And so it goes with most of the work on this old truck - waiting on parts.

I have since been able to fire up the engine and check for leaks. No leaks from the heater or water filter I installed, nor any of the hoses.

I also want to point out that I had put 10 gallons of ethanol free gas in the tank along with Stabil 360 as I knew the gas would sit. Not sure how long it would stay good. The truck has sat for 1 year 3 months without being fired up. When I was ready to start it again, I put a little gas down the carb and a light shot of starting fluid. Turned the engine over and it fired right up! I have since let the engine run 2 hours one day and 3 hours another day - still on the same gas, trying to run out the 10 gallons so I can add some fresh. So, I think it safe to say that if you fill your car with ethanol free gas and add the Stabil 360 for winter storage, you should not have any problems firing it up because the gas has gone bad come Spring. I would however keep and eye on the carb to make sure none of the gaskets have shrunk on you and leak.
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-04-2019, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
 
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Still plugging away on this old truck. Finally have good weather to work with. Engine has been running great and fires up very easily.

Drained and refilled the transmission - it's a 4 speed truck transmission, non-synchronized so you have to double clutch it to shift. The stuff that came out was ugly looking. Had a red tint to it, but did not look like rust. It was a little thin so my guess is someone added automatic trans fluid to it thinking it was a modern transmission. Got the E-brake, which is a brake/drum affair on the back of the transmission, relined with new lining material (I did this myself) all reassembled and adjusted. It works.

Had the windshield wipers hooked up, but the Speedway electric wiper motor did not have enough HP to operate both wipers at the same time. So re-working them using a rear wiper motor I pulled from the back glass of a Ford Explorer. Hopefully it will do the trick.

The truck has a sunvisor which was in a box of parts. Had to have it, but did not want to have to go through the trouble of having one stitched up like original. So went with a tinted green polycarbonate plastic that I cut to shape and installed. Refurbed all the hardware and bolted up.

Next up are the brakes. Some previous owner attempted to service the front brakes. These are Budd hubs, 14" x 2" drums and shoes. Everything was wrong with them. I pulled the drums off. Bearings & races were all good. Unique oil seal in that it is felt rather than a typical "rubber" seal. It was like new. The brakes were crusty and the shoes were frozen inoperative. The wheel cylinders were the wrong ones (these wheel cylinders used 2 size cylinder bores with the larger bore in front). Shoe lining was marginal and drums were rusty. Pulled everything apart and cleaned up and painted. The set-up is very simple. The bottom and top of the shoes are operated by a cam which moves the shoes in & out so that you can get the correct gap between shoe lining and drum. Adjustments are made by the bolt heads at the back of the backing plate. You can see the 2 cam/bolts at the bottom of the shoes. The upper cams are behind the shoes to push them in/out utilizing the 1 spring's tension to keep them in place. No self adjusting with these, all manual. There is a slot in the front of the drum to insert a feeler gauge to measure the air gap between lining and drum. Simple. The only spring you see holds the top of the shoes into the wheel cylinder cups.

Put everything back together and adjusted the brake shoes using the feeler gauge. Filled up the original master cylinder I had sleeved and rebuilt. Bled the brakes and now I have operating front brakes. I am now on to the rear brakes which are slightly different. The axle has to be pulled to remove the large spindle nut & bearings and then slide the drum off to expose the brake assembly. I will have the wheel cylinders sent out and relined & rebuilt and am going to have the shoes relined and drums turned so all will be new. I have to add new steel brake lines and a new rubber line to from off the axle. All that will be left will be to reassemble, bleed the brakes, and drain/fill the rear-end with fresh gear oil.

Then on to some body work which I have just started to do.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-28-2019, 08:47 PM Thread Starter
 
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Doing so many things to this truck that I'm all over the place. The "Green Diamond" engine is a 233CI straight flathead 6-Cyl. It is rated a whopping 93 HP at 3,400 RPM, 181 ft. lbs. of torque at 1,000 RPM's, and has a compression ratio of 6.3:1.

So how are you supposed to know what the RPM's are of the engine when you don't have a tach? So I created a tach based on a photo of one that I got off the web. Although the engine has a redline of 3,400 RPM, I went with a redline of 3,000 RPM which I felt was far more comfortable on the old engine and a means to protect it. Photo #1 .

I started with a 3" diameter body VDO tachometer, 12-volts to match the 12-volt conversion I did, and pulled the tach apart. I then removed the plastic tach facing which I wanted to have changed to resemble the look of an original 1948 style tach. Photo #2

I searched the web and found a company in Florida, CAD Graphics Home - custom dials, gauge dials, pressure gauge dials, CAD Graphics Inc , that offered custom designed gauge face overlays. I sent the plastic VDO face plate along with my design I drew up and the fine points I wanted incorporated into the design to be used in producing a custom dial overlay (old style font, triangle type RPM indicators, & the International logo). Emails were exchanged until the final design was approved by me. Near complete, the face has a white background, but the older gauges had a light tan background. So this was corrected and the final design accepted. Photo #3 is with white background.

The overlay was then applied by CAD Graphics right on top of the VDO faceplate and matched the RPM sweep exactly. It was then mailed back to me. The price? $50.00 plus shipping! Great value.

I reassembled the tach for a test fit. I made a wiring harness for the backlit lights and swapped the 2 filament bulbs for 2 tower LED bulbs - less amps used. The bulbs were so bright that the VDO tach, which was designed to allow the back lighting to show through the RPM numbers and scale lines did just that, and bled right through the custom dial face. To correct this, I simply used black model paint and a brush and covered the RPM numbers by painting over them. I left the RPM scale lines which are on the outer perimeter of the VDO tach face to bleed through which matched the RPM scale lines on my custom dial face. So this now back lit the perimeter of antique face so you could see the RPM scale lines at night when the lights were turned on. An added bonus I did not even consider.

The RPM needle/pointer from the VDO tach had a bulky contemporary design and I wanted to use a RPM needle/pointer that looked correct for the era. I used the pointer from another tach I had and had to modify the VDO needle. I then used JB Weld to overlay the older style needle on top of it. I gave it a coating of Chevy engine orange.

With the bezel still off, and the RPM needle still loose, I tested it on the KB5 engine. I hooked up the power to activate the tach and then disconnected. This is said to position the tach electronics where it should be with the RPM needle set at "0" RPM on the scale. I then pressed the needle onto its shaft, but just enough to keep it engaged, and so I could pull it back off if the needle was incorrect in its position.

I fired up the engine and the tach came to life. I measured the RPM's against my 1980 Craftsman engine analyzer with its RPM scale - it was a match, the tach RPM was the same as my Craftsman tach.

I then pushed the RPM needle down on its shaft for the final time and reassembled the glass/bezel. Photo #4 .

I used a section of reproduction cloth covered 18 Ga. green wire from Rhode Island Wire to match the rest of the wiring under the hood. Located a place on the dash where I wanted the tach, and used a 3 1/8" hole saw to make my hole. Cut, soldered ends, and used heat shrink wrap on all wires and plugged them into the back of the tach. I went with a separate toggle light switch connected to my fuse block & a 3 AMP fuse. Inserted the tach in its place and secured it all together. Looks and operates like factory, and no guessing how many RPM's the old engine is turning. Photo #5 , 6 & 7.
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