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Discussion Starter #22
At some point I may need some help understanding the PHS docs and which of them are simply a listing of what was available and which of them are an indication of what my car original had. And in some cases what the abbreviations mean - such as M31 TCRG CONV 2/SP - and whether the black marks on one of the pages means that is the option selected or if that item was not available. I need to pull out the originals and double check, the scans I made have some areas where it looks like there might have been factory markings there - but as I recall, the docs from PHS are effectively blank in some ares where it looks like there might have been some sort of marking which wasn't captured by whatever scanning equipment they used.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Didn't manage to get to the car this weekend but did work on cleaning more parts I brought home.

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Not going crazy on the brackets and stuff as I may have to replace them, partly because the PS pump I have, this one:
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appears to be from a 1969-1974 Firebird/Camaro, like so:
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(with some modifications such as the side being bashed in and the return line being bent significantly - but it did work and it still turns quite easily) vs a PS Pump correct for a 64 GTO like so:
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I was going to try to rebuild the pump I have - but if it is not correct and doesn't fit properly - then replacing it seems the much better option - not sure if anyone would want to buy the old one since it would need a rebuild - but I suppose if you are doing a build and either adding or it is missing the PS pump, mine could at least be used as a core - which only makes it worth $20 - so it will likely end up on a table at a swap meet.

I am not likely going to buy any parts just yet - or sell anything I don't need just yet - I think waiting at least until I get down to the frame and make a complete assessment of what is needed and get the codes of the engine block to verify what I actually have, seems lie a better plan.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Work day 4. Got the fenders, doors, front bumper, core support, and more removed.
Wheel wheels(or innner fenders) will likely need to be replaced. the driver side fender is in pretty good shape but the passenger side has evidence of collision repair.
interior is down to the dash and steering wheel and the wiring harness to the trunk.
Bro-in-law said he would pull the driveshaft and drain whatever gas is in it.
In the spring he will be installing a lift. If I can get the engine out or maybe the body off by then it will be easier for him to move it around without me.

probably need to start looking for a used engine hoist and engine stand and maybe at least a body cart if not a rotisserie and some wheel dolly jacks.
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Glad to see it coming along. I see so many cars for sale on craigslist that are taken apart and they lose interest. keep your head up and carry on. Buy parts when you can't work on it and work on it when you can't buy parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Got another day of work done on the disassembly. Rear bumper removed and disassembled. Manifold removed and brought home to work on when it’s too cold to go outside. A few other minor items. Removed the gas tank. It had about 7 gallons of gas no less than 5 years old in it. As we poured it out it looked like vegetable beef soup, though it wasn’t quite as chunky.
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Got another day of work done on the disassembly. Rear bumper removed and disassembled. Manifold removed and brought home to work on when it’s too cold to go outside. A few other minor items. Removed the gas tank. It had about 7 gallons of gas no less than 5 years old in it. As we poured it out it looked like vegetable beef soup, though it wasn’t quite as chunky.
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Looking good and moving forward. When cold days arrive, that's when you can do sub-assembly work indoors and get some of the smaller pieces and parts disassembled, cleaned, rebuilt, and reassembled ready for when they are needed. I do it this way myself as a means to keep moving forward even if at a snails pace. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #29
After 36.5 hours total on site (plus some hours cleaning small parts at home) plus 4 or 5 hours of assistance from the bro-in-law, I still have the following disassembly items to do:
Drain plugs in the trunk floor pan.
Rear differential assembly with hubs and links.
Rear springs/shocks.
Entire Dash board and steering wheel/column.
The upper weather-stripping on each side.
Chrome trim around the rear wheels, need a better screwdriver or vice grips or something on those little screws.
Parking Brake pedal plus whatever remnants of that long since cut cable remain.
Rear brake lines.
Front spindles/control arms/springs/shocks.
Body mounts.

Engine and trans are still attached to each other along with the water pump and starter motor.
I had the trans rebuilt back in high school, and never had any trouble with it since then, so it should not need any parts/repair, but since it has been sitting for 20+ years, despite the fluid coming out looking like new, it will most likely need to be disassembled and cleaned and all seals and gaskets replaced.
I had some work done on the carbs back then as well - but at the moment the linkage won't even move, so they will be getting a full rebuild no matter what.
The engine itself was never a problem, but I have always wanted to get it rebuilt, and again, it has been sitting for 20+ years. The coolant coming out still looked like new - haven't drained the oil yet.

The main issues I had with the car when I bought it (aside from the various incorrect parts that were used) were repeated melting and shorting of the ignition wring and constant blowing out of the header gaskets. The main reason I parked it when I did was someone had tried to steal it and before I got a chance to fix that, my brother died in a motorcycle accident and I inherited his '67 LeMans. Since then, between buying a house, getting married, having a kid, etc, there was always something else more pressing, and I didn't have the space or the time or the cash flow to even think about starting a restoration. When I started this thread - I thought I had one or two of those lined up and got very close a couple times. Two major breakthroughs were my bro-in-law offering his barn as space (he built a second barn for his vehicles, and is converting the original barn into a workshop) and getting the house paid off. Time is still somewhat constrained, so just need to keep plugging away every chance I get. I do expect it will be another 6 months before I get to a point where I am actually putting things back together. At the moment, the focus it getting everything removed from the frame so that it can be properly cleaned and repaired and prepped (paint? powder coat?) to begin bolting new/restored parts back onto it.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Got another day and a half or so done
Got the firewall stripped on both sides except foe the parking brake, the ask tray, and one screw left on the glove box door.
Got all 12 body mount bolts undone, although 2 of them snapped off and one kind of exploded in a cloud of rust.
It seems that my block and heads are actually from a ’71. Haven’t decided the transmission yet and still need to find all the codes on the intake.
I will need to decide whether to rebuild what I have or trade it for something closer to correct.
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Keep the engine you have. The original is gone and it'll never be original again. You have a good known engine and sometimes replacing what you have with another can become a can of worms, and costly. With a tri-power on top, no one cares what the heads/block are because that is what people look for. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Keep the engine you have. The original is gone and it'll never be original again. You have a good known engine and sometimes replacing what you have with another can become a can of worms, and costly. With a tri-power on top, no one cares what the heads/block are because that is what people look for. (y)
That is the way I am leaning, I know what I have all works together - and now that I know the block is a '71 it might make getting a set of headers and gaskets that fit better. Plus, it is the way it has been since the day I bought it. Plus, if I go back to a proper '64, I'd have to give up the dual gate shifter, which is cool.
My plan is to drive it and though I will take it to car shows and cruise ins - I am not banking on taking the top prize everywhere I go.
If it were serial number 1 or the last '64 to roll of the assembly line for the model year, or had something else that made it a unique example then maybe it would be worth spending the extra dollars to make it correct.

The main issues I had while I was driving it were electrical (the wiring harness has always been a huge mess) and the interior, which was also a bit of a mess when I bought it. Now the main issues I have to deal with is 30 years of sitting, fortunately inside a garage, so I need to remove all the rust and all the rubber bits have turned to rock and or dust. The damaged front passenger fender, the cracked radiator core support, and the rusted out front wheel wells and dirt panels are the biggest parts which are likely going to be easier to replace than to fix.

All the fluids which have come out so far looked pretty good, aside from the upper radiator hose, I had one which the anti-collapse wire inside, which rusted significantly since it was sitting high and dry above a reservoir of water/coolant. I wonder if I should send a sample of the fluids out for testing - or if that is a waste of time since I need to have everything stripped down to bare metal parts and will be replacing a bunch of stuff anyway.

Next time I get on site I should be able to get the torque converter and flywheel off so I can get the engine on a stand and start stripping it down.
 

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That is the way I am leaning, I know what I have all works together - and now that I know the block is a '71 it might make getting a set of headers and gaskets that fit better. Plus, it is the way it has been since the day I bought it. Plus, if I go back to a proper '64, I'd have to give up the dual gate shifter, which is cool.
My plan is to drive it and though I will take it to car shows and cruise ins - I am not banking on taking the top prize everywhere I go.
If it were serial number 1 or the last '64 to roll of the assembly line for the model year, or had something else that made it a unique example then maybe it would be worth spending the extra dollars to make it correct.

The main issues I had while I was driving it were electrical (the wiring harness has always been a huge mess) and the interior, which was also a bit of a mess when I bought it. Now the main issues I have to deal with is 30 years of sitting, fortunately inside a garage, so I need to remove all the rust and all the rubber bits have turned to rock and or dust. The damaged front passenger fender, the cracked radiator core support, and the rusted out front wheel wells and dirt panels are the biggest parts which are likely going to be easier to replace than to fix.

All the fluids which have come out so far looked pretty good, aside from the upper radiator hose, I had one which the anti-collapse wire inside, which rusted significantly since it was sitting high and dry above a reservoir of water/coolant. I wonder if I should send a sample of the fluids out for testing - or if that is a waste of time since I need to have everything stripped down to bare metal parts and will be replacing a bunch of stuff anyway.

Next time I get on site I should be able to get the torque converter and flywheel off so I can get the engine on a stand and start stripping it down.

It's all about budget sometimes, and of course time. You can do a lot with the engine you have. Pull it down and take a look. I have had engines were all I did was put a nice hone on the cylinders and then new rings. The ridge at the top of the cylinders will let you know how much wear. If a minor ridge, you can probably go the hone route. If a heavy ridge, then it is boring time and new pistons.

In any case, I would have the block (which you can disassemble), heads (which you can disassemble), and crank all hot tanked and magnafluxed for cracks even though the engine may seem perfect - it just can save throwing good money on top of bad if a problem arises after re-assembly.
 
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