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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've searched but can't find an answer to this problem. Ames couldn't help either. A long time ago, someone broke the the lock post (pivot sutd) on my passenger side vent window. I can find replacement pivot stud kits for 66-67 lots of places. I even have a complete 67 vent window out of a LeMans, but it seems that in 64 and 65 the pivot stud was part of the vent window frame. Has anyone else encountered this? If so, please let me know how you fixed it.
 

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I've searched but can't find an answer to this problem. Ames couldn't help either. A long time ago, someone broke the the lock post (pivot sutd) on my passenger side vent window. I can find replacement pivot stud kits for 66-67 lots of places. I even have a complete 67 vent window out of a LeMans, but it seems that in 64 and 65 the pivot stud was part of the vent window frame. Has anyone else encountered this? If so, please let me know how you fixed it.
Hi there, I've just read your post as I'm looking for a solution for the same problem on my 65 Gto. Did you have any luck ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately, no. I think the solution is to find a replacement frame and window from somewhere like Frank's Pontiac parts. I have not looked much lately, but they seem to be scarce with no reproduction parts available that I am aware of. Please let me know if you figure out a less costly solution.
 

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I'm thinking the same. I found the whole vent window setup as an exchange to buy at eastcoastrestorations.com for $430 US. A bit expensive for me as I live in New Zealand.
The image they show looks like a 66 setup but they are advertising it as 65.
I was thinking of getting something machined up that i could attach to the broken pivot stud and attach a new handle to.
I will let you know if I find any success in this option. Our country is in full lockdown for 4 weeks or more at the moment so I wont be able to do anything until it is over.
 

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If it is a 66 design, it will not help you. 1965 was the last year they made them that way. It was probably an issue that warranted the design change and ultimate elimination of the vent window completely. I think your plan is most realistic. I have been focusing on engine assembly and getting the engine back in the car, so the window is lower down the priority list for me. On mine, the metal is pretty soft and I'm not sure how I might attach anything to it. Looks like poor quality alloy that my father called "pot metal," just a mixture of junk, not very strong even when new. I may try JB weld first since that will not damage anything further if it does not work out. I'm skeptical that it will hold. PontiacJim is a fabrication guru, so if I knew how to prompt him to look into this, maybe he would have some ideas. Any thoughts Jim?
 

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I don't have a photo to go by? So went on the internet looking for something to give me an idea of what might work. Keep in mind that sometimes a search for same year Chevelle can sometimes produce more results because more of them.

So it looks like a stud cast with the "pot metal" and it then holds the lock in place?

If you are not too concerned with originality/looks, I would drill out the stud and use a carriage bolt coming in from the outside of the window vent? Something like this: Type 18-8 Stainless Steel Carriage Bolt Square Neck 1/4-20 x 2-1/2"
This one is stainless steel, but they also come in chrome. The rounded head would show on the outside and blend in with the vent window? Do the other side to match and 98% of America would never know it was not original.

Here is another bolt version which is used on vent window locks. Click on the picture to size it up: 1968-1972 All Makes All Models Parts | CX1525 | 1968-72 Chevrolet/GMC Truck Vent Window Handle; RH | OER

I don't think JB Weld would be strong enough to hold for any length of time, especially if you repeatedly used the lock.

They seem to have a low heat pot metal welding rod that can be used with a propane torch called "muggy weld" but it could be tricky. I have seen at car shows a giy who demonstrates a low heat welding rod and this may be it. He of course makes it look simple. Here is a web page I found that offers up solutions: Repairing Pot Metal | Pot Metal Repair Zinc Die-cast Welding James Ruther

But, if it has to be as factory original, then finding a good replacement may be the only real alternative. There is one on Ebay for $125, so gives you an idea of pricing as I would not pay and arm and an a leg as it may even be cheaper to buy a complete door in need of repair and strip the vent window out. 1965 Pontiac GTO Original Driver Side Vent Window Assembly | eBay

Realize this is a post door, but as example, good price. Ship it via Fastenal as I keep reading this can be a better price than other truck freight shippers: 1964 65 lemans GTO post door - auto parts - by owner - vehicle...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't have a photo to go by? So went on the internet looking for something to give me an idea of what might work. Keep in mind that sometimes a search for same year Chevelle can sometimes produce more results because more of them.

So it looks like a stud cast with the "pot metal" and it then holds the lock in place?

If you are not too concerned with originality/looks, I would drill out the stud and use a carriage bolt coming in from the outside of the window vent? Something like this: Type 18-8 Stainless Steel Carriage Bolt Square Neck 1/4-20 x 2-1/2"
This one is stainless steel, but they also come in chrome. The rounded head would show on the outside and blend in with the vent window? Do the other side to match and 98% of America would never know it was not original.

Here is another bolt version which is used on vent window locks. Click on the picture to size it up: 1968-1972 All Makes All Models Parts | CX1525 | 1968-72 Chevrolet/GMC Truck Vent Window Handle; RH | OER

I don't think JB Weld would be strong enough to hold for any length of time, especially if you repeatedly used the lock.

They seem to have a low heat pot metal welding rod that can be used with a propane torch called "muggy weld" but it could be tricky. I have seen at car shows a giy who demonstrates a low heat welding rod and this may be it. He of course makes it look simple. Here is a web page I found that offers up solutions: Repairing Pot Metal | Pot Metal Repair Zinc Die-cast Welding James Ruther

But, if it has to be as factory original, then finding a good replacement may be the only real alternative. There is one on Ebay for $125, so gives you an idea of pricing as I would not pay and arm and an a leg as it may even be cheaper to buy a complete door in need of repair and strip the vent window out. 1965 Pontiac GTO Original Driver Side Vent Window Assembly | eBay

Realize this is a post door, but as example, good price. Ship it via Fastenal as I keep reading this can be a better price than other truck freight shippers: 1964 65 lemans GTO post door - auto parts - by owner - vehicle...
Thank you Jim. You came up with several ideas I had not considered. I appreciate it. I'm not at all original (can't afford to do that) but I like the appearance of original, so I may try the bolt idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't have a photo to go by? So went on the internet looking for something to give me an idea of what might work. Keep in mind that sometimes a search for same year Chevelle can sometimes produce more results because more of them.

So it looks like a stud cast with the "pot metal" and it then holds the lock in place?

If you are not too concerned with originality/looks, I would drill out the stud and use a carriage bolt coming in from the outside of the window vent? Something like this: Type 18-8 Stainless Steel Carriage Bolt Square Neck 1/4-20 x 2-1/2"
This one is stainless steel, but they also come in chrome. The rounded head would show on the outside and blend in with the vent window? Do the other side to match and 98% of America would never know it was not original.

Here is another bolt version which is used on vent window locks. Click on the picture to size it up: 1968-1972 All Makes All Models Parts | CX1525 | 1968-72 Chevrolet/GMC Truck Vent Window Handle; RH | OER

I don't think JB Weld would be strong enough to hold for any length of time, especially if you repeatedly used the lock.

They seem to have a low heat pot metal welding rod that can be used with a propane torch called "muggy weld" but it could be tricky. I have seen at car shows a giy who demonstrates a low heat welding rod and this may be it. He of course makes it look simple. Here is a web page I found that offers up solutions: Repairing Pot Metal | Pot Metal Repair Zinc Die-cast Welding James Ruther

But, if it has to be as factory original, then finding a good replacement may be the only real alternative. There is one on Ebay for $125, so gives you an idea of pricing as I would not pay and arm and an a leg as it may even be cheaper to buy a complete door in need of repair and strip the vent window out. 1965 Pontiac GTO Original Driver Side Vent Window Assembly | eBay

Realize this is a post door, but as example, good price. Ship it via Fastenal as I keep reading this can be a better price than other truck freight shippers: 1964 65 lemans GTO post door - auto parts - by owner - vehicle...
Here are a couple of photos of my broken latch and intact one. I was wondering about the UV light glue they are advertising. Maybe that would work too? IMG_3110.JPG IMG_3109.JPG
 

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I don't think any glue/epoxy by itself will hold. Another option might be to drill into what is left of the broken stud base and possibly tap it for a shallow depth machine screw hole. Then cut the head off the machine screw and guesstimate how long you will need it to be in length to insert into the matching hole you are going to drill into the broken lock handle. Then use an epoxy on the stud and insert into the hole. I would let it dry for a week to really cure hard.

Then I would drill a matching hole deep enough into the broken lock handle. Drill it as closely centered as the stud, go as deep as you feel you comfortably can without breaking through to the other side, but also drill it a little oversized to give you a little wiggle room for misalignment. Then use a good JB Weld or other epoxy and coat the stud and drilled hole, and put a good layer on both ends that are broke. Push the lock over the supporting stud and down to where the broken pieces match. Wrap a piece of masking tape, or some kind of tape, around the broken section to keep the epoxy from running/dripping out. Let it dry for about 1 week before you touch it so it thoroughly cures.

My thinking is that you are creating a stud that might hold/stabilize the 2 broken pieces in place. May not work at all, but might be an option to try first and then go to plan "B" if it does not, and that might be the carriage type bolt if you can make that work.

Seeing you aren't concerned with original, one of the kits that are for the vent window locks might be adapted to do the trick. (y)

Another crazy idea. I might grind down the broken stub smooth. Use a template to cut a piece of 1/8" flat steel plate that matches that "triangle" piece that holds the lock. Drill a hole in the center in the same spot the broken stub is - and weld a stud/bolt or whatever will work to hold the lock. Weld it up on the back side so you can grind it flat - put a slight taper on the plate so the weld can get in there and hold after grinding smooth.

Then with such a large flat surface, JB Weld/epoxy the fabricated part to the window section, and I would think it should hold pretty good. Then use a thin piece of stainless steel sheet, cut it to match your template, drill a hole in the center large enough to slip over the stud, and epoxy it to the metal piece to act as a cover and it'll look like the rest of the stainless steel frame. Then once cured, secure your lock. I don't know what holds the lock to the stud, but maybe you can adjust the length of the stud to make sure the lock closes tightly to do what it is supposed to do and draw the vent window closed.

LOL, now you have a number of things to consider. I know I'd get it to work one way or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I believe you could. Now, if my limited fabrication skills can come close to your creative vision, I might get a working result ?
 

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I've gone down the same road as Jim suggested with good success. I filed the broken pot metal flat, then drilled and tapped 5/16 UNF thread as far as I could into it. Has to be centered. Then used a 1inch by 5/16 UNF cap screw which I cut down the head to the shape of the existing stud which had been broken off, did a test fit with new handle and had to file out a slight chamfer on the underside of the cap screw head to allow the roll pin to go through during handle installation. I then used loctite 243 to secure it in the thread. I found it easier to fit the cap screw into the thread and then mark out the orientation of the cut out needed on the head before cutting down the screw length.
Hopefully these photos will help.
134399
134395
134396
134397
134398
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've gone down the same road as Jim suggested with good success. I filed the broken pot metal flat, then drilled and tapped 5/16 UNF thread as far as I could into it. Has to be centered. Then used a 1inch by 5/16 UNF cap screw which I cut down the head to the shape of the existing stud which had been broken off, did a test fit with new handle and had to file out a slight chamfer on the underside of the cap screw head to allow the roll pin to go through during handle installation. I then used loctite 243 to secure it in the thread. I found it easier to fit the cap screw into the thread and then mark out the orientation of the cut out needed on the head before cutting down the screw length.
Hopefully these photos will help. View attachment 134399 View attachment 134395 View attachment 134396 View attachment 134397 View attachment 134398
Thank you
 
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