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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you bolted a chain from block to frame to keep the torque-monster from breaking an engine mount, distributor, linkage, etc

I have looked pretty closely under the hood on the left side of my ‘69 and cannot find a decent spot to tie the chain to the frame.

I have a 200R4 in mine and the shifter linkage / steering backdrive linkage doesn’t like all the twisting that happens when I light ‘em up.

Any advice?


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I did this years ago on an off topic car but can't help with your frame to chain issue, are there any captive mounts that will not move that much for these ? Hooker Headers make these pt.# 71221004 hkr?????
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did this years ago on an off topic car but can't help with your frame to chain issue, are there any captive mounts that will not move that much for these ? Hooker Headers make these pt.# 71221004 hkr?????


I’m not sure that those Hooker clamshells will work - I will have to crawl around this afternoon and take a better look.

Thanks Bruce


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The chain or even cable is one way to limit torque over, but what bothers me is that they are solid stops and a violent pull/slam on either when the engine torques over puts a lot of stress on wherever you have it bolted to.

I plan on adding some kind of torque strap on my build, but I want something to absorb some of the initial slam when the slack is snapped tight on the chain/cable. I am probably going to fashion a stop like one of these used on Mopars. Take a look and it will give you a few idea. You might even be able to use one of these if you get your dimensions and email them to see what they may offer. Engine Torque Straps

Another idea tossed around is a solid mount on just the left side and a rubber mount on the right side. It may work, but I am against all the torque focusing on the bolts/side of the block where the motor mount is attached. If I wanted to go solid mounts, I would go with an engine/trans plate as the bolting loads would be better dispersed. They do make these for Pontiac engines, but again, I would not use it for a street car.

You want a little flex so mounts can absorb the torque impact and flex, and absorb vibrations.

Check out the pic of the Fury 440CI police engine torque strap. It is bolted to the engine mount and appears to be on the left side of the engine, so it probably hooks under the engine crossmember. When the engine torques over, the dogleg would simply pull up against the frame to stop engine roll. You can see the rubber bumper pad that hits the crossmember. When I built my brother's 360CI SixPack, the donor engine came out of a 1977 Dodge Charger Dayton. The engine had one of these "snubber" type torque bumpers that bolted to the right side exhaust manifold and sat slightly above the frame rail. This is opposite of the 440CI design, but it does the job in limiting the amount of engine roll by using the right side.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips PontiacJim.
I agree with you about not wanting there to be slack in the tie down - that will only lead to further problems.
I like the Mancini systems and will look further into them.
Thanks once again - I’ll let you know what transpires,

Joe


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May not have been the right thing to do. But I always used small turnbuckles, in order to take out all the slack. Did this on 2 '69 GTO 455 bracket cars. Just used stock rubber mounts, then used short turnbuckles, attached to both ends of the driver's side head. Had small cable around the frame rail, to attach the lower end of the turnbuckle to. Used double lock nuts, to make sure the turnbuckles could not back off.

Worked just fine. Never had any problems, and didn't notice any severe vibrations.

Not recommending that anybody else do this. Just posting what I did that worked for me.

I'm quite sure there are fancier, better lookin ways to do it.
 

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May not have been the right thing to do. But I always used small turnbuckles, in order to take out all the slack. Did this on 2 '69 GTO 455 bracket cars. Just used stock rubber mounts, then used short turnbuckles, attached to both ends of the driver's side head. Had small cable around the frame rail, to attach the lower end of the turnbuckle to. Used double lock nuts, to make sure the turnbuckles could not back off.

Worked just fine. Never had any problems, and didn't notice any severe vibrations.

Not recommending that anybody else do this. Just posting what I did that worked for me.

I'm quite sure there are fancier, better lookin ways to do it.


Hey man, often times the simplest way is the way to go!


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let me tell you a quick story...the first time i fired a 455 in my '65 after the break in period, i gave the throttle a quick stab to throw some revs...the hood was off...the motor torqued violently to the passenger side, ripping the brand new driver side motor mount in 2... it so startled me, i snapped the throttle shut whereby the motor rocked back to the left ripping apart the right motor mount. the motor set there in the engine bay tied only to the transmission mount, shaking and baking.....i now have a short piece of chain on the driver side between a head stud and the thru bolt on the upper a-arm...this is on the 65...i have had zero issues since, despite years of hard launches at the track...btw, even if you don't shred the motor mounts, an unrestrained motor torquing to the right will tend to unload the right rear tire as the body wants to torque left to counter act the motor's rotation....we love our torque monsters but sometimes you have to chain 'em down....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Interesting that you used the thru bolt on the upper A arm - that’s about the only spot that I can see that is readily available on the ‘69 as well.

Thanks John,


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Chevrolet had engine mount breakage problems in the mid to late 60's. They had to retrofit a kit via a recall that incorporated a wire cable hold down. I remember my dad's '65 Impala had these installed. There are a number of them for sale on Ebay just to give you another example of engine hold-downs. Fairly simple. Click on the pics once to bring them into view and you can click on them again to expand them. :thumbsup:
 

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