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I've been a huge fan of these cars since I was @ 10 years old and it has always been one of my bucket list cars. One came along at a price I couldn't refuse or even feel right if I tried to haggle. Anyway, I'm new to owning a 1967 Tempest so forgive me if this is a stupid question. I've been doing all kinds of research and my vin tag states its a standard Tempest 2dr coupe "23307" my question is, why do my doors have full frames around the door windows? Most the cars I see on the web and at shows have no frame around the glass. Shouldn't this frame along with the quarter glass frame make it a sedan? I see no description or explaination anywhere that differentiates a coupe from a sedan. It's probably something obvious I'm missing....
 

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Sedan is more of a "big car" term. The sport coupes are A.K.A. post cars (frame around windows) and the non post cars are called hardtop coupes.

The 33 series Tempest for 1967 were all post cars. You had to get the 35, 37 or 43 series to get away from the sport coupes (post).
 

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Thank you for the explanation. Now, was only one or the other used for the GTO trim or could you have a GTO post and a GTO non post car in 1967?
 

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For 1967 the GTO came in 3 flavors: Sport Coupe (post), Hardtop Coupe (no post), and the Convertible.

The post cars were known to weigh less, and many high performance buyers would get that body style option. The Hardtop Coupe though was in my opinion a better looking body style especially when all the windows were down and you see right through the car, very clean looking.
 

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We bought a post coupe new in July 1967. Silver with black vinyl roof, black interior. The extra bright work around the doors made it stand out. However as a roger said, most everyone wanted the clean look of the hardtop. I vaguely recall the term "hardtop convertible" being used. In the late '50's GM made a number of 4 door cars with no posts, including station wagons.
 

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yup...I remember hardtop convertible too...some early hardtops even had marks in the roof where the bows on a convertible would be...

my first car was a 1974 Buick LeSabre 4 door hardtop (not sedan although they made that style too) that was clean with all 4 windows down from the windshield to behind the back doors...

Bill
 

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compare that to today's cars...perhaps one maybe two styles when back then there might be a two door post, two door hardtop, four door post and four door sedan and maybe even a wagon version...add to that there might be three or more styles from a marque within that body style (Tempest, Lemans, GTO) with varying trim levels within those trim levels...WOW

Bill
 

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Silversport had a good comparison with today's cars. How many cars today or even the last 20 years that are 2 doors can have all 4 window roll down? Most rear windows are permanently up.
 

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Wind noise....we had a 2003 Infiniti M45 4 door. Screamer. 340 hp V8. The glass was not encased in the pillars. When you opened any door, it was just like an old style hardtop. You could run your hand over the top of the class. There was a B pillar. It was completely covered in black foam insulation material. The door glass slowly tensioned up against it as the window was raised. During the short time we owned it I could hear the wind noise start to increase.
 

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The term Hardtop Convertible was used by GM in 1949, with the introduction of their new pillarless coupes. The car 'looked' like a convertible with the top up (no posts) and almost always had a two tone paint job to accent this. In the mid-'50's, hardtop convertible applied to even the 4 door cars and station wagons like the Buick Caballero. VERY interesting time in US automotive history. No real safety regulations, and no emisson standards. Build it like you want to. Those days are long gone!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone for the feedback! I too have seen these "hardtop convertibles" and wagons and always loved the no pillar look however I'm ecstatic to own the post version in the shape of a 67 Tempest. I am not going to complain.

My brother had a 57 Chevy 4dr with no center post and it was crazy to look at that much open area with the windows down.
 

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Not only were the "post" cars a bit lighter they are less prone to twisting under high torque launches which made them a favored platform for track cars.

I also like the extra bright work of the door trim. and less squeaks, rattles and wind noise.
 

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FYI hotrodmann. The bright work on the sills and around the windows is anodized aluminum. Be careful how you treat it.
 

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I've always owned hardtops, because that's kind of what fell into my hands. I prefer the way they look, and the lack of that huge door frame around the windows. Cleaner look, IMO. That's what the public thought, too, as they sold many more hardtops than coupes. That said, I have driven many post-coupes. Without exception, the added rigidity of the post makes these cars drive much 'tighter' and they feel more solid than the hardtops. I would have absolutely no problem with a coupe, and have attempted to buy them in the past (and would love to have a '64 post coupe in the future!)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
FYI hotrodmann. The bright work on the sills and around the windows is anodized aluminum. Be careful how you treat it.
I don't know if this is blaspheme or not to hardcore purists but I'm planning to blacken all the trim and wheels (probably powdercoat). Going for the look of the Rad Rides Nova.
 

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20 years ago, I had a chance to buy a '66 GTO post coupe as a parts car to my hardtop. The car was all in pieces, but all there. If I remember correctly, the guy was asking $1000-$1200. I didn't want deal with something that was already tore apart, what a Huge mistake that was. I still kick myself for not jumping on that car and bringing it back to life.:banghead:
 

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the basic hardtop body style before your choice of options was alittle more expensive than the sports coupe, that to me is not inferior in any way. I was fuelin up one day at the local Sunoco when I guy looking at my car said " oh, you got the cheap gto." LOL.
 

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"Oh, you got the CHEAP GTO..."
"Where's YOUR GTO? Which one did YOU get?" would have been my reply. I know. Big mouth......
 
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