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Discussion Starter #1
Have a 64 GTO (since 1968) that was mostly rebuilt in the early 1990's and has been in storage for the last 6 years.

It has been started on a regular basis and has about 3000 miles on the engine.

It's been so long since I've been on the road, I'm not sure what to expect for a engine normal operating range. Any thoughts? Just a 389 AFB.

Also, you were to add another gage to a tach, temp, and oil pressure what would it be? And why. Voltage?

Thanks
 

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I would say anywhere in the 180 to 220 range for normal operating temps. Everyone is scared when the gauge hits 200 but that is fine. Anything over 220 is getting hot and you should probably run a 193 or 200 F thermostat. I always drill a couple of 1/8" holes in mine to let the air bleed out.

As far as the other gauge to add.....how about a boost gauge? :D

Vacuum, trans temp (automatic),Amps.....One of my favorite cars I had was my Buick Riviera....two gauges; speedometer and fuel level; that was it. ;)

Too many gauges can ruin the driving experience IMO. My car has a 5" Tach with shift light, Amps, Fuel pressure, Fuel level, Oil Pressure, Coolant Temp, Boost....It's like driving the Space Shuttle. I hate having to monitor all that and would rather just drive it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info.

Not familiar with a boost gage but I'll look it up.

Basically running with a 4 speed. Also got rid of the clutch fan years ago and using a 6 blade racing fan and a shroud. This car has Standard steering and brakes w/ no AC.

Is there any advantage to using a 180-degree thermostat versus the 190+ standard thermostat? I know it would open earlier but does it run the engine cooler?
 

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64-67 Expert
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What Alky said. 180-220 is normal. I run 160 'stats in my GTO's and they run 180-200. If the cooling system is 100%, it can run at T-stat temps, but usually due to load and thermal build-up, they run a tad hotter. Factory type clutch fans are superior to aftermarket fans for a street driven car. They're less noisy and they cool much better.
 

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Also got rid of the clutch fan years ago and using a 6 blade racing fan ....
Which was probably a mistake on your part. The purpose of the fan clutch is to keep the fan spinning at the rpm where it is most efficient at moving air. If you spin a fan faster than that, it will move less air and do little more than just rob power and make noise.

Bear
 

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flexalite makes a rigid fan that with correct spacer and a shroud, does its job well at keeping my engine cool. better than any fan clutch set-up. stop n go, or highway.
 

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64-67 Expert
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I had one of those on my '65 for a few years. Worked just fine, but my car sounded like a Mercedes Diesel going down the road. My factory clutch set-up cools the same or better and makes no noise. Whatever works for you.
 
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