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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve scoured the web looking for the valve cover cap for my Calif. built Tri-power with the built-in pcv. There’s only one recent image from an actual build that shows one (not incl. due to potential privacy issues). I’m guessing that one might be a custom job or a nos. I am including a stock image of the CAP type I need. Hoping for help on where I may be able to source one. Thank you in advance. JM
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These guys sell something similar to this
Older Ca setup as I think most were 90° metal vent tubes just going from off the tree fitting coupler straight into the vcover through just a grommet , which is still readily avail, maybe they can help you out thou
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is a GTO application. I did see your image or one like yours as well but was not sure which one was correct for it. My car which was not in the best condition when purchased came with the center tube not connected to anything and a capped valve cover hole. Are you saying that the metal tube type like in your image is what would be considered OE correct and not the pcv on the cap for the 65’ GTO & if so do you have a source for the metal tube?
 

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Ames sells the vent tube and the cover grommet
The tube aint cheap
So unless your going to show the car all original or concourse
Prob just better to put the non-CA reg type bases on the air filters and plug in the plain rubber plug on the cover, do make sure you have the correct breather cap on the other valve cover eithervway you go, with the tube installed, it was the basically sealed push-on ‘top-hat’ style N224Y on the ‘64, that way all the air went thru the vent tube side..
No smog is needed now in Ca on these fortunately
 

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The diagram in post 1 is for 1966. The 1965 did not have a cap but used the metal tube going directly into the rocker arm cover with a grommet as shown in post number 3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ames sells the vent tube and the cover grommet
The tube aint cheap
So unless your going to show the car all original or concourse
Prob just better to put the reg type bases on the air filters and leave the plug on the cover, do make sure you have the correct breather cap on the other valve cover eithervway you go
No smog is needed now in Ca on these fortunately
Thank you for the response. I will go to Ames and pick up the metal tube type. I am close to completing my frame off restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Congratulations! Looks great!

While I’m sure you’re aware, the drivers valve cover is different than the passengers in terms of the hole and related location for the grommet for the metal tube. As a related aside, the hump on the drivers valve cover faces the back.

Best of luck finishing your car...
I recently removed the valve covers to prime the motor and failed to notice. Thanks for the catch.
 

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Good morning, nice photos and interesting information. Thank you for your efforts to share history and your current project progress.

I've been working on my 65 Tri Power convertible moving towards getting it cleaned up and freshly period correct as the hot rod it's always been ( in my 50 years of ownership) vs. being restored. It was not built as a Tri Power car. I've recently added that option, but wanted to fabricate a closed crankcase / PCV system which would have represented what was legal in California back when those emission control laws were enacted. I was a licensed smog tech back then from about 1971 till 1981 or so. Support from the local Pontiac dealer for OEM CA legal retrofit emission systems was near zero. Most of those parts came from A/C Delco aftermarket kits sold in parts stores or sometimes a Chevy dealer. We'd find kits with closed crankcase valve cover caps, various KV system tubes, and flame arrestors then start drilling holes in air cleaners and valve covers to hook stuff up as best we could. We kept boxes of leftover parts to use when odd systems needed to be reworked. I doubt there were more than a handful of real '65 Ram Air Tri Power cars ever assembled by dealers so my feeling is virtually anything seen like that now for 1965 is a best guess of what might have been done under factory or state guidance, not a gospel documented truth. But I'd sure be interested in getting copies of what may have been published back then to make my present day best guess fabrication even better.

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This photo shows the Ames restoration Ram Air pan modified with KV breathers. They are 1 inch tube formed into 80 degree bends with bead rolled ends, pressed into broached holes and tack welded into the pan as was done in many GM applications. The flame arrestors are also from generic GM applications, notably Corvette and medium duty trucks. Deviation from OEM literature is in having a right and left side tube assembly. One source mentions just a left side breather for Pontiac. But on many hot rod engines with M/T valve covers for rocker arm clearance when running high lift camshafts, all sorts of weird stuff happened from no breathers ( valve cover casting holes never opened ) to both open, to being with or without a PCV valve.

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This photo shows the power brake hose in its normal Tri Power location and a handmade closed valve cover cap with 1 inch outlet to match the GM flame arrestor tube size. The cap was made from several caps to obtain period correct logo, size, and base orientation and bead rolled tubing set into a die cut hole. It has appropriate top section logo stamping, internal baffles, stainless steel wool oil separator material inside it and is clocked to point in a "correct" direction using a non-vented base. I used to buy this cap from A/C Delco to use on cars undergoing retro fit emission modification, but don't recall it's part number, and it doesn't seem to be available anywhere now. The spring clamps are period correct but should be black phosphate plated, not grey. Surface finish on the pan is powder paint semi gloss, an upgrade from wet paint used by Pontiac. Not seen is metal work to remove the triangle shaped air cleaner locating dimples not found on OEM pans for '65. On my future repair list is an engine wire loom upgrade back to OEM materials.

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This view shows an OEM '65 Tri Power PCV valve setup which I believe is correct. And the second KV breather cap and hose which came from my imagination of how things should have happened back then. The brass tube inset into the forward fuel line junction block is for an under dashboard gauge. Because of its construction with a union several inches behind the 90 degree fitting this tube will fit both 4 bbl manifold carburetors and the Tri Power system if I ever swap them again. Back then we'd swap manifold and carb's pretty often trying combinations we thought might work better or came into our hands from "deals" with other car owners. Back then, in the 1980's, Gates came out with their "safety stripe" heater hose product line which had better phyical properties than OEM black Delco hose. Many Hot Rodders in my area seemed to prefer it, and I've always had good luck with it, so that is what went back into my car a few months ago.

If this system had come into my shop back in the early 70's I'd have signed off and passed this engine for its emission certification.

Best regards and best of luck in moving your projects ahead. Ladd
 
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