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Now that I have replaced the entire brake system, it is time for new drums. I have found all kinds all over the internet. My questions is: Is there a particular set that I should be looking at? in other words, is one kind, or brand, better than another? Also, I have read that on a 66 conv. they should be painted red... any thoughts would be very appreciated.
 

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I suspect you have drums all around and did not convert the front to discs? Drums are not the favored choice for good stopping power, but if keeping the car original, it's understandable.

Pinion head is the expert on wheel drums. He uses them on his restored cars, but has them treated to greatly improve their stopping power. Brake shoes are also critical to good stopping power. Personally, I stay away from the "lifetime" types or metallics as they are generally very hard materials and work best when they get hot, not so good when cold/cool. I have always used the cheapest shoe/pad I can get as they seem to be softer and work better for general driving and DON'T wear our your drums/rotors like the harder metallic type linings do - that's why they give you "lifetime" shoes/pads because they are going to wear out the drums/discs and you will have to buy new ones and that's where the shops/parts guys make their money.

Hopefully PH will respond, or PM him. He has mentioned what he runs on his cars with drums on several posts in answering other brake questions. You might do a search and try to find a post having the info.
 

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They would be painted red if the car came with Rally 1 wheels. Try to get good used or any made in USA drums. Avoid offshore stuff if you can. If your drums are still thick enough, they can be machined to perform like new.
 

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New US cast and machined 9.5" brake drums, where???
Not going to happen, new, unless one finds NOS or NORS drums made many years ago.

Through the 90's, into the 00's pulled select alum rear drums in the Pick -N-Pulls and crusher yards off 80's G body's, some 3rd Gen F body's, and even quite a few Cadillacs & Buricks. Only thick drums, if scored, didn't grab them.
On my own rear drum Pontiacs, that's what Ive had lightly turned, had cryoed, and have rebuilt backing plates with new wheel cylinders, stiffer return springs, and the special matrix brake shoes from Praise Dyno, now MusclecarBrakes.com. Also have numerous thick cast iron drums that have pulled off parts cars. Nothing wrong with running cast iron originals if they are thick, in my own cases, am trying to save rearend reciprocating weight.
 

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DW, you need to mic your drums and see if they can be turned. If so, you are much better off than with 'new' Chinese stuff. Old parts are not necessarily bad parts. On the contrary. They are USA made of quality materials. If maintained and not gouged out by being driven with metal-to-metal brakes, they can and do run for 100's of thousands of miles.
 
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