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Discussion Starter #1
GTO is 100% original as far as I can tell, except for the rims. GTO was not running when purchased, so the first step of my journey is the fuel system.

I removed the tank, and cleaned it inside and out. The insulation barrier adhered to top of the tank is shot, and I found a replacement on Ames. I don't see any issues with the fuel tank itself, so I'd like to reinstall the original.

I started to reinstall, but then began going back and forth on the correct way to go about it. I can see that the tank appears to be stainless where some of the insulation came off. The tank is black elsewhere, so I assume it was painted at the factory.

I want the car to retain as much value as possible by staying true to originality. I don't know to what degree this stuff even matters. Is there a specific paint I should use. Should I rattle can it? Should I powder coat it? Should I just put it back in as is?

I couldn't get my pictures to upload. I'll get that figured out soon. Thanks!

John
 

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The areas that appear "stainless" is actually the original zinc plating that was preserved by the insulation you removed. Tanks were not painted at the factory so over the years someone likely painted black for looks. Closely inspect the tank for rust or deep pitting, look at the seams as well. Look inside the tank for rust. If you see rust on the inside, you may be best to consider a new tank. If not and the tank is good overall clean it well, wire brush, epoxy prime or at least a rusty metal primer spray bomb. I used the Tank Tone paint from Eastwood for top coat and it looks pretty good. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Helmerrock. My first thought was to just replace the tank to be on the safe side. I will definitely examine the inside more closely this weekend. I didn't see any rust on the inside, but I didn't pay much attention to the seams. Thanks again for the recommendation. I'll check out Eastwood later today to purchase the Tank Tone. Take care,

John
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I wound up working on the motor for awhile, and now ready to move forward with the fuel system. After further inspection of the seams (as suggested by Helmerrock), I’m going to replace the fuel tank. I’m looking at the Ames catalog, and need to decide between galvanized vs stainless steel, and paper vs standard insulation.

How long should stainless steel hold up it’s appearance? I’d be driving a couple days a week in sunny southern California weather. I wouldn’t want to mess around painting a stainless steel tank because of the required prep. I would only consider stainless steel if it lasted a lot longer than galvanized while retaining it's look.

If I were to go with a galvanized tank, I probably wouldn’t paint it to keep it stock.

I think black would look much better than both stainless steel and galvanized, and would obviously prefer to paint it while new, instead of after the fact.

I believe the paper insulation has the sticky back and is what came stock. I think the standard insulation is thicker rubber, but doesn’t adhere to the tank. I read that the rubber insulation might squeak a bit. Are there any advantages one way or the other.

I can reuse the existing tank straps. I read that galvanized straps were used as replacements, but weren't what came stock. I have to replace transmission cooler lines, and will probably go with stainless steel. I may just replace the fuel lines as well.

At this point, I'm leaning towards staying stock, but I welcome any and all recommendations. I guess I'm just wondering if I shouldn't buy a tank from Summit Racing or Jegs. The tank and transmission cooler lines both have extra shipping charges from Ames because of the shape etc...

I'm sure there are a ton of aftermarket performance options out there, but I won't worry about those until I can afford to build my 455. Hopefully, I get less indecisive as this project continues.
 

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Unless it's a show car, I'd keep and run the original fuel tank. If not leaking or rusty, why replace it? Original parts are superior in materials, quality, and fit to reproductions, hands-down, every time.
 

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I would run the original tank. Better fit, better materials, and better quality than reproduction parts. If not leaking or rusty, not an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My gto isn't a show car. The tank didn't leak. There is a small amount of pitting inside the tank, but probably not enough to matter if I just reinstalled as is.

I was more concerned with the appearance of the outside of the tank. I will research a bit further to see how difficult it would be to seal the inside of the tank as a precaution. I remember seeing a por-15 product.

My new neighbor works in an auto-body shop. I'll ask if he would be interested in prepping and painting the tank for me. I'm not sure why I'm dreading the paint part so much! Either way, I'll probably go with the Eastwood tank tone product.

It will save me some money too if I only replace the sending unit and insulation. This stuff sure adds up fast!

I'm super anxious to get the car back on the road. I probably need to stop worrying quite so much about the appearance of the under carriage until I can gain access to my auto lift. Until then, it's proven very difficult to gain access underneath the car. I got to accustomed to working on my 4x4's with tons of clearance.

I think I have a plan now. Thank you,

John
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Today, I cleaned the exterior of the tank with degreaser and a lot of elbow grease. I was surprised at how well it turned out. There was some rust on the top of the tank where I assume water must have pooled up, so I used a wire wheel. I haven't ordered the insulation, POR-15 tank sealer, or Eastwood tank tone paint yet. I'm trying to finalize a list of parts before doing so.

I should be able to still use my fuel sending unit if I replace the sock, but I don't immediately see how to replace the sock.

It's an a/c car, so it has a 5/16" outlet with a return line. It seems that Ames only has one with 3/8" outlet. Is it at all worthwhile to convert to 3/8"? I would imagine I could find a correct replacement elsewhere, but hopefully I'll be able to just replace the sock. Thanks,

John
 

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Most times these old cars have tanks that have rust inside. Eventually the residue gets caught on the sock and filter causing issues. The products for coating the inside is usually worse. When it comes loose, it plugs things up. I have heard none that work. I plan to replace with new.
 
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