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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking of pulling my 455 motor and tranny out to put in a firebird and putting the 350 and the 4 speed in the gto to sell not sure how much it's going the hurt the value of the gto i do not have the matching number parts in the first place for the gto thanks for your thoughts
 

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of course anything non-numbers matching hurts the value. I cannot imaging going from a non-matching 455 to a 350 (assuming similar value motors) is going to have a large impact. Maybe a grand or two, depending on the buyer. I am assuming you are not taking a $10,000 built 455, and replacing it with a $500 junkyard special 350?
 

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The desirability factor will suffer. Most would rather have a 455 than a 350.... They are both non matching so the value shouldn't be affected much. The amount of people interested will be....
 

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It will hurt the value of the car by 3 to 7 thousand dollars, the cost of locating and rebuilding a Pontiac 389-455 to put back in the GTO. A 350 in a GTO is a downgrade, and a negative factor in a muscle car. If I were to buy a GTO with a 350, my first thought would be on replacing the engine with something appropriate. That said, if you want the 455 for a Firebird, you'd have to pay $$$ to get another one to put in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok thanks the gto was a 400 car 4speed I built a 455 with all the good stuff and a 6 speed going to try to find a 400 firebird the wife would go nuts if I if I built that same seat up I would have to get like 40k for the gto to let it go the way it is now and I do not see that with a 400 or a 350 would take some thing in the 20s I like the gto but don't want to cut it up to make a pro touring car out of it that is what I had plan it the first place
 

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Yep, a 350 is not a good choice for resale. Find a 400 and just do a stock rebuild. They offer an inexpensive rebuild kit with cast pistons that your machine shop can surely get for you. I used this kit on my '68 Lemans 400 in my first build and it kept the costs way down on the short block, but I added a cam, did the heads up right, and had some machine work done. I could have saved a little on the heads, but decided where I wanted to put my money and since I was not planning on spinning it to 6,000 RPM's anyway, felt the stock route was just fine. Used a 1972 engine with the 7K3 heads that ran on regular and still pulled like a mule and burned up the tires -I was happy and it didn't cost me an arm and a leg. You don't have to build a "big" engine, just a 400, and many would prefer a more stock engine so that they could drive it. Not everyone wants big HP.
 
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