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Discussion Starter #1
I need new rubber bushings for my stock front sway bar during my front end tear down/rebuild. My bar has never been off from what I can tell on this 60,000 original car. It is a sport convertible with T41 option front end. The bar measures around .920, almost 7/8 but not 1". I see earlier years offered 15/16". So, I ordered 15/16" rubber bushings. Now I'm wondering why the difference in bar thickness, and If I should just buy a new bar, since I plan on putting a rear one on (I welded the box plates to the rear control arms during frame rebuild).
 

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I need new rubber bushings for my stock front sway bar during my front end tear down/rebuild. My bar has never been off from what I can tell on this 60,000 original car. It is a sport convertible with T41 option front end. The bar measures around .920, almost 7/8 but not 1". I see earlier years offered 15/16". So, I ordered 15/16" rubber bushings. Now I'm wondering why the difference in bar thickness, and If I should just buy a new bar, since I plan on putting a rear one on (I welded the box plates to the rear control arms during frame rebuild).
If I had to guess, it was due to the increased weight over the years. The cars got heavier. So the larger diameter sway bars were sized accordingly.

A larger diameter bar will lessen body roll. Larger front bar may also require the corresponding sway bar mounting brackets - not 100% sure, but when I sized my front bar up, that was what I did.

Do you plan on running high speeds, racing into corners, or beating on your car?

Before I went and invested in a larger diameter front sway bar, I would add the polyurethane bushings and end links. They are stiffer in material than rubber and can tighten up the suspension due to less deflection of the bushing - this way you can use what you have and save a few $$. If you feel you want more, then step up to a larger diameter sway bar.

Here is the correct bushings for a 7/8" dia sway bar: https://www.yearone.com/Product/1964-72-gto/95108e Then get your end links.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just plan on casual cruising. I see that link actually specifies up to 72 for those 7/8" bushings. Ames doesn't. It seems as if the 7/8" wasn't used on the front of 72 according to Ames. Confusing.
 

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I just plan on casual cruising. I see that link actually specifies up to 72 for those 7/8" bushings. Ames doesn't. It seems as if the 7/8" wasn't used on the front of 72 according to Ames. Confusing.
Yep, sometimes what the parts supplier lists in their details are not always correct or accurate. If in doubt, I always email them to confirm so if it is wrong by some chance, there is no argument over the part and guess who will be paying freight charges if they are wrong.

I would just make sure your diameter measurements are correct. You don't want a bushing that has a larger diameter than your sway bar as it will be too loose and too tight and it won't fit.

So my choice would be to go with the polyurethane bushings with your stock sway bar and think you should be OK with that for casual driving. This will tighten things up a bit and improve handling over the stock rubber bushings, but not be too stiff like stepping up to a larger diameter sway bar. So your call on it. :thumbsup:
 

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I would spend the money and get 1.25 swaybar for the front. There will be a noticable difference in handling, you will love it, I did.


Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've seen the discussion of bigger isn't always better. It can cause handling issues. I don't have a rear bar yet, but set myself up for one and won't overdo it to cause handling issues. I used my caliper and the bar varies from about .890 to .920 because of paint on it yet. I knew if I ordered a bushing set for 7/8" I'd never get them on.
 

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I've seen the discussion of bigger isn't always better. It can cause handling issues. I don't have a rear bar yet, but set myself up for one and won't overdo it to cause handling issues. I used my caliper and the bar varies from about .890 to .920 because of paint on it yet. I knew if I ordered a bushing set for 7/8" I'd never get them on.
I got a 1.25" bar from a junkyard (pick-your-part) Trans Am and polyurethane bushings, the rear bar was stock on the 1970 and boxed control arms - you should get one.
The handling issues are not a problem, the roll center of the suspension is the next weak link in handling.

I love the slot car feel of the steering, with the urethane bushings on A-arms and sway bar - I have end links with plastic domed inserts and they do not deflect under load.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I got a correct set of polyurethane Energy suspension front sway bar bushings to fit the front bar. I also have the same material for the end links. So, it should perform better than stock. New rear bar will be next to round out the renewed suspension.
 
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