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Premium Member
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 67 has ac but everything is not there,Looking at aftermarket set up's it looks like you need to change everything on the inside also,so would it be better to just find what I need or get all new for a small sum of 1200.00:(
 

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Super Moderator
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5,744 Posts
Depends... how much of the original system do you have? Also "bear" in mind that if any of the components like the compressor, evaporator, condenser, etc. have been sitting open to the atmosphere for a long time they're probably toast - rusted inside. Another consideration is that the factory system was desiged and calibrated to run on R-12 refrigerant, not R134a. R12 is still available but you have to have a license to buy it, and even then it's hideously expensive. R12 systems can be converted to R134a, but some folks say they don't work as well that way.

My 69 was a factory air car, but when I put it back together I used an aftermarket kit instead. Don't be deceived, that's not an easy thing to do either, especially if you want to adapt the aftermarket kit to use your original factory controls.

You're in a little better position than I was though because companies like Vintage Air actually make kits for the 67.

In your position, that's probably the route I'd choose.

Bear
 

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64-67 Expert
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Okay, my take on it, being an expert as I've never owned a GTO with air conditioning: I originally lived on the CA coast all my life, and moved to the HOT central valley about 10 years ago. On the coast, most old cars do not have AC, so I never had a GTO that had it. Since moving to Fresno, I have met with and talked to other GTO guys, some of which have GTO's with factory AC., and some with aftermarket AC. I met one gent in his '60's who bought his '65 GTO new, with A/C. He converted it to Vintage Air using his original dash ducts and controls, so it looked all stock inside the car, and it actually looked much cleaner underhood with the newer- smaller- neater- better -engineered components. He said: With the stock GM system, it was fine up to an outside temperature of 95 degrees. Hotter than that, the A/C could not keep up, and it was uncomfortable. Since the change to Vintage Air, the car was comfortable even on 105 degree days. This is a Capri Gold car with a Black interior. I've worked on the original A/C systems with the POA valve, D6 compressor, etc. It's a heavy, complex, ponderous system. And it would be even less efficient with R134a. Go with the Vintage Air and use your original ducts, etc. JMHO..........
 

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I used Vintage Air....They sell a kit to convert a factory A/C car to thier system. Everything retro fits well and they have excellent tech support.....the compressor is about the size of an alternator and much more efficent than the old ones. Plus that ton of "stuff" on the fire wall will all be gone. CALL THEM they will take the time to explain things. Eric:cheers
 

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I talked to an AC guy at a swap meet and he said the factory compressor provides 200% CFM flow over the smaller sanden compressor and talked me out of using the new compressor. I haven't installed any AC yet. The POA valve runs the compressor all the time, and just regulates the pressure up or down upon demand, gas hog. You can convert it to a hi/low pressure switch and it turns the compressor off when not needed. Others have said the sanden is great, I have it on my Astro Van and it cools great, I am going to convert to it over the original myself, just have to do it.
 
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