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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought one of these at the Barrett-Jackson auction this year. I visit the giant Meguiar's trailer there every year and have almost bought a buffer numerous times, but this year I bit the bullet. For $250, I got the buffer, a box containing an array of Meguiar's products and a large nylon case with scads of zipper pockets for carrying everything.

I used the buffer on Saturday with great results. I went over my GTO first using the regular Meguiar's paint cleaner (maroon bottle) with the yellow polishing pad, following that with an application of their NXT wax using the tan waxing pad. Turned out pretty well--certainly better than I could've done by hand.

I've gone through cycles over the years in how I care for my car finishes. Years ago I used to use a Wen orbital buffer with various pads (terry cloth, foam, etc.), but then quit and starting doing everything by hand to be safer. Hand polishing and waxing certainly was safer, but exhausting. Inconsistent, too. This Meguiar's buffer (a Porter-Cable tool, actually) finally brought me back around to machine buffing. It's a smaller unit than my old Wen buffer; much easier to manipulate and very, very safe.

I may even wax my wife's vehicle now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dealernut said:
Have not got one yet. I am strongly considering one. So after your comments I want one even more. Seems like its fairly good.
There's no reason not to, honestly. If you currently are using the little yellow Meguiar's foam pads for hand waxing, all you're doing by going to their dual-action polisher is mechanizing the process. The buffing pads you use with the polisher are pretty much the same thing as the foam pads, but they're thick enough and soft enough that you run no risk to your paint (unless you actually drop the polisher or something like that).

The only drawback is that Meguiar's kinda soaks you when it comes to the peripheral stuff you need. I got my kit as an all-in-one kinda deal, but I've noticed that if you go to buy the buffer separately, you may have to buy each individual piece separately--the backing plate, the yellow foam pad, the beige foam pad, etc. I could be wrong about that, but just be sure you buy everything you'll need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
b_a_betterperson said:
Used to use a Milwaukee buffer -- but went to hand work ages ago and stayed there.
I'll confess, I'm a little surprised at myself for going back to a buffer. That Wen buffer I used to use was so huge, loud and unweildy that I had no regrets when I ditched it. It served me well (I used it back in my college days to detail friends' cars for spending money), but it was such a chore to deal with. Then the screw-in handle broke off, leaving me no choice but to just hold onto the body of the buffer. Lame.

The Porter-Cable unit Meguiars co-opts is much tidier and quieter--far less intimidating. It's doing exactly what I'd do by hand, only faster and more evenly.

And if it's a good workout you're looking for, forgo the microfiber bonnet for wax removal and use a microfiber towel instead! That's what I did.
 

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GM Kid said:
.

The Porter-Cable unit Meguiars co-opts is much tidier and quieter--far less intimidating. It's doing exactly what I'd do by hand, only faster and more evenly.
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Exactly, that is what is great about it, I'll often spend 5+ hours polishing a customers paint job, no way in hell could I do that by hand
 

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dealernut said:
Ordered mine. Should be here in 7 days. i bought the all in one kit with the pads, and bottles. We have a Meguiars rep that services our dealership. So I got a nice price. ;)

good job :) You'll love this thing



BTW, in case anyone else is looking, I should of mentioned this earler, all the Meguiars buffer is, is a porter cable 7336 or 7242, both can be found for about $100. The cool thing w/ the megs package is you get pads, product, a backing plate etc.



If you guys have any questions on what products to use etc, feel free to ask me. Afterall, this is what I do for a living :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
HotRodGuy said:
If you guys have any questions on what products to use etc, feel free to ask me. Afterall, this is what I do for a living :)
Hey, I'll bite. I've done lots of detailing myself, but mainly just for my own cars.

When I was talking to the Meguiar's guy at Barrett-Jackson, I pointed to a messy-looking, half-empty bottle of Medallion Premium Paint Cleaner they'd been using in a demo and told him how much I liked that product. I was surprised when he told me that Meguiar's has quit making it (something about VOC laws, the guy said). I had always used the Medallion product as a step up from Scratch-X, as it seemed a bit more aggressive while still being very safe.

So I asked the Meguiar's guy what I could switch to as a substitute. He urged me to try one of their tan-bottle items, the #82 polish. I noticed that the products in this range (80, 81, 82, etc.) all had red arrows on the left side of the front label indicating their aggressiveness.

I follow the Meguiar's credo of using the least-aggressive product for the job. I've burned through clearcoat before, and I never want to do it again. What do you think of using these tan-bottle items with the D/A polisher?
 

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GM Kid said:
Hey, I'll bite. I've done lots of detailing myself, but mainly just for my own cars.

When I was talking to the Meguiar's guy at Barrett-Jackson, I pointed to a messy-looking, half-empty bottle of Medallion Premium Paint Cleaner they'd been using in a demo and told him how much I liked that product. I was surprised when he told me that Meguiar's has quit making it (something about VOC laws, the guy said). I had always used the Medallion product as a step up from Scratch-X, as it seemed a bit more aggressive while still being very safe.

So I asked the Meguiar's guy what I could switch to as a substitute. He urged me to try one of their tan-bottle items, the #82 polish. I noticed that the products in this range (80, 81, 82, etc.) all had red arrows on the left side of the front label indicating their aggressiveness.

I follow the Meguiar's credo of using the least-aggressive product for the job. I've burned through clearcoat before, and I never want to do it again. What do you think of using these tan-bottle items with the D/A polisher?

I highly suggest #80 Speed Glaze, I use to use it A LOT, I ran out and was offered some free Poor Boys polish's to try and i've been using those lately. That said, I'll probably go back to #80 when I'm out of the PB stuff. If that isn't aggressive enough I highly recommend #83. IMO, you wouldn't be able to get enough out of #82 w/ a D/A, I think that'd be best used w/ a rotary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
#80, huh? I thought a glaze was just basically a polish--no cutting action whatsoever. Mind you, I'm not looking to remove any heavy defects. I just occasionally like to get rid of the routine swirls that accumulate. What's more, whoever detailed my GTO when it was new was a klutz. I've found places where there were obvious little buff marks (looks like the little letter "e" written in script over and over), but I've minimized that.
 

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GM Kid said:
#80, huh? I thought a glaze was just basically a polish--no cutting action whatsoever. Mind you, I'm not looking to remove any heavy defects. I just occasionally like to get rid of the routine swirls that accumulate. What's more, whoever detailed my GTO when it was new was a klutz. I've found places where there were obvious little buff marks (looks like the little letter "e" written in script over and over), but I've minimized that.

The #80 definately has some cutting action to it, it is pretty mild as far as abbrasives go though, but it works excellent and will definately remove routine swirls that accumulate. It's a few steps above Scratch X IMO. If it's not strong enough, try #83 :)


You know how all these companies do it, some have glazes w/ no cutting action, some do, some call their "waxes" "polishes", etc, etc.
 

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I actually just found out I was wrong about #82, it is actually less abbrasive then #80, I was thinking it was their rotary polish. I was mistaken.


I'd still go for #80 personally, i love that product.


check out www.autopia.org or www.meguiarsonline.com both are great detailing forums :)
 

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Does the buffer have a variable speed control? If so then, great. For those of you looking to purchase a polishing machine, (as we call it), look for one with this feature. Makita, Flex and Milwaukee are a few reputable names to look for in regard to durabilty and a variable speed control.
One key to being successful with a polishing machine is to keep the pad cool and stay away from the edges. When it heats up, so does the surface your polishing. When that happens you burn the clearcoat and then you're screwed. The speed of the machine and a lack of material on the pad are the key to keeping the surface cool. I've seen it all too often, when an individual does this and burns his cars finish. Dont be too aggressive with the pressure put on the surface . Go nice and easy and use a low speed till you get the feel of the machine. It'll pay off in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
johnebgoode said:
Does the buffer have a variable speed control? If so then, great.
Yes, it does--although I'm getting mixed signals about which speed to use for which application. There's a little wheel on the back of the buffer that goes from 1 to 6, with 6 being the fastest. In the CD that came with my buffer, Barry Maguire recommends using 4.5 for nearly everything. When I bought the machine at Barrett-Jackson, though, the 50-something guy who sold it to me said that he uses setting 6 for polishing, setting 5 for waxing. I lurked a bit in the Maguire's online detailing forum and saw that people like much slower settings--3 or 4.

The 4.5 setting worked well for me.
 

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GM Kid said:
Yes, it does--although I'm getting mixed signals about which speed to use for which application. There's a little wheel on the back of the buffer that goes from 1 to 6, with 6 being the fastest. In the CD that came with my buffer, Barry Maguire recommends using 4.5 for nearly everything. When I bought the machine at Barrett-Jackson, though, the 50-something guy who sold it to me said that he uses setting 6 for polishing, setting 5 for waxing. I lurked a bit in the Maguire's online detailing forum and saw that people like much slower settings--3 or 4.

The 4.5 setting worked well for me.
I suggest you start with the middle setting to feel the characteristics of the machine, then work your way up. My guys hardly use it full throttle, but then again we're dealing with fresh paint. Although your paint is hard already, that doesnt mean ya can't burn it.
 
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