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Former Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1
Yes, no more cars built in Australia.......ever again. Pretty sad IMO. I guess we can thank the "global" economy or China's boom or whatever but this is the last straw for the auto industry in Australia. I'd say GM/Holden went out on top there though.

Exhaust Notes - MSN Autos

http://www.gtoforum.com/f7/ford-waves-white-flag-australia-45994/

http://www.gtoforum.com/f7/just-gm-shut-down-holden-59586/

Incredible to me that no one on this forum cares to comment on what the implications of are of this.

Just think, not so long ago we weren't that far away from this ourselves.

I know if GM Wentzville shut down it would be devastating to our community and that stretches well into the city of St. Louis. Luckily we did just get the new midsized pickup truck here which should start production this year. I'm hoping it will help my personal economy. :D
 

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Oz Auto Industry

:cool With a population of only 23 million (3 million less than Texas) the global auto industry believes that producing cars elsewhere and then shipping them to Oz with be more cost effective. Welcome to economics 101.

Buyers matter, not workers...

Life sucks.
 

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Former Moderator
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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I was reading that they were losing money based on Austrailias strong dollar value.


.73 percent of production was exported so it wasn't all domestic production.


Quote" In 2017, the Japanese automaker will exit local manufacturing with Holden, Ford and Mitsubishi. It's possible no more cars may be built in Australia ever again.




When General Motors said that it would no longer build cars in Australia after 2017, that country’s flagging automotive industry was effectively put on notice -- Mitsubishi stopped building cars there in 2008, and in May, Ford said its two plants would close in October 2016.


Now Toyota has announced that it has no option but to end vehicle Australian vehicle production. Like Holden, it will close its factories there in 2017.


Thanks in part to the country’s strong dollar, building cars in Australia has become a money-losing proposition; over the past 10 years, Toyota says it has lost nearly $1.6 billion operating in Australia, despite government support to the tune of nearly $1.1 billion.

It’s the same story Holden told as it announced its plans to end Australian production.
GM shutting down Holden in 2017, quitting all Australian car production
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Toyota kicked off its Australian manufacturing operations 1963, when car-assembly firm Australian Motor Industries began building the Toyota Tiara. Toyota eventually took control of AMI, purchasing a controlling interest in the company in 1968. By 2012, the Japanese automaker was building more than 100,000 cars per year in the country. 73 percent were exported to other markets.


The automaker’s current Australian-market lineup looks much like ours, with mainstays like the Prius, Corolla and Camry and some vehicles, like the Kluger and Rukus, that are sold here wearing different names (the former is the Toyota Highlander, the latter the Scion xB). Basically, there isn’t anything built and sold in Australia that isn’t also built somewhere else.


Still, the decision to end Australian manufacturing is expected to impact 2,500 Toyota workers plus up to 50,000 in related fields -- and it will spell the end of an industry that stretched back more than a century.
 

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My perception is that the percentage of "gearheads" in the population as a whole is shrinking fast. Even with the popularity of "new" muscle cars, the average buyer knows very little about what he/she buys and sure can't do their own work, nor do they want to.

Sad

Bear
 

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Discussion Starter #5
:agree I wonder what the classic car hobby will be like in the future.

Sure there are people fixing up late models but with their increasing complexity it makes it more difficult. Not to say it can't be done but from experience one of the major factors to me is the wiring and computer systems. I don't see how they will last 50 years and be on the road like the 64 GTO :cool.
 
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