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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While waxing the goat yesterday I noticed a couple of paint problems:

1. I have two or three small but deep chips on the hood. The hood on my last car didn't chip this badly after nine years, I've only had this car for two weeks!

2. My bumper has very obvious spots whose outline looks like part had been taped off where the finish instantly goes from baby's butt smooth to 120 grit sandpaper. The rough area encompasses a good portion of the bumper underneath the 5.7 logo and under the tail lamp.

What could/would the dealer do about these? Is it worth the risk of getting a repainted bumper to fix the areas?
 

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This is a common problem with the GTO's. Thin/weak paint. I've heard of a handful of people actually getting the dealer to re-paint theirs with no charge. Since you've only had it for 2 weeks you should bring the problems to you dealers attention asap
 

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I hate paint trouble, so I can sympathize.

Regarding the scratchy areas on the back bumper, you definitely should at least talk to the dealer about them. It almost sounds like shipping damage that the dealer tried to fix. Drive the car to the dealer, point out the trouble to the service manager, and see what they have to say about it.

What you do next will have to be up to you. If the dealer has a respectable body shop, see if they can get someone from the body shop to come out and look at it. A talented, attentive detail guy probably could smooth it all out. If the dealership doesn't seem trustworthy, take the car elsewhere and get the dealership to pay for it . . . if you can. Even if you can't, your peace of mind is worth something. I have a feeling this can be fixed without a repaint.

Regarding the nicks in the hood, ouch. Those'll happen, but it totally sucks anyway. Here are the basics of my fix-it method:

1. Get some matching touch-up paint from your dealer's parts department. 2. Fill the nicks with two or three small coats so that the paint is a little higher than the surface. Wait a day.
3. 3M makes a gentle scratch remover you can get at just about any auto parts place. Buy some, then find yourself an old, white cotton t-shirt and a credit card.
4. Wrap a double thickness of t-shirt around the credit card and pull it taut. Put a dab of the 3M stuff on one corner of the shirt-covered card. Hold this arrangment in such a way that your forefinger is pushing down on the corner of the card with the 3M goop on it, with the rest of the card pulled away from the paint by your remaining fingers.
5. Gently, rub up and down, back and forth over the raised touch-up. The flat corner of that credit card is going to ensure that you don't dig into the touch-up and gouge out the paint. Check your work often. Let the compound dry, rub it off, and go at it again. You'll notice the touch-up getting flatter and shinier with each attempt. Change corners on your credit card every so often so that you use a clean area.
6. The touch-up still won't be perfect when you're done, but it won't be eye-catching anymore, either. Remember, the important thing is that you get some color into the nick, and that the touch-up is unobtrusive.
 

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Very good advice there, GM Kid. That's the way to get this stuff fixed.

Sounds like the back bumper work is the result of a dealer airbrush job. Done right, it's OK. Done poorly -- and the clearcoat looks like a fogged up bathroom mirror. Good luck with your repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advise. Makes since about the possible shipping damage. This car is my daily driver which I don't expect to be perfect for long, but this issue is pretty noticable. I just worry about a dealer body shop making matters worse.

Urgh... the stresses of new vehicle ownership :mad:
 

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For those of us who care about our cars, a new vehicle is stressful, isn't it?

But don't let this stuff get you down. I think most of the stress is that we expect "new" to equal "perfect," and it just doesn't. Whenever you buy a new car, you invariably find all sorts of stuff wrong with it during the getting-acquainted period. If you don't, well, you're not looking closely enough!

I'm still finding stuff on mine after a month or so. I never like it when I do, but the trick is not getting the forest mixed up with the trees. The trees are the problems. The forest is . . . YOU OWN A GTO! You'll find the proper cubby holes in your brain in which to stick the various defects you're coming across; stick 'em in there and let 'em collect dust. Just don't forget how much that "5.7" or "6.0" badge means, and what an awesome car the GTO is overall.

Another coping strategy: Always differentiate between legitimate problems and mere imperfections. Problems need fixing. Fix 'em and be done. Imperfections you can't really do anything about . . . and even if you can, realistically, you're not going to. So be done with those, too, and put your mind at ease.

And then settle into a nice, long, happy ownership period in which you KNOW about your car's troubles, but you just don't care because you're having too dadgummed much fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great replies, really!

I need to decide whether or not to pursue the bumper imperfection or not. I did this when I bought my 96 Formula with 1800 miles. I found out shortly after getting it that the passenger door had been repainted, but it didn't seem too bad at the time. Over time it was absolutely horrible, I couldn't bear to wash or even wax it as I can't even explain what may have happened to it, but it was worse than a Maaco $99 special! If it had been the drivers door I would have had it repainted. I can live with the GTO trunk if it doesn't worsen over time.

Overall this car is built magnificently well. I'm no body man but the rest seems flawless to my eye.
 

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I noticed two small chips on the hood right at the bend. I noticed the chips when the car was about a week old.

now it is three months later, and it is finally warm enough to apply touch up, and wax the car. guess what, it is rusting!!

Since the dealer I bought two oldsmobiles from told me to take my GTO and my problems to the dealer I bought it from, and the car is a smartbuy, i may just leave the chips alone, and let GM deal with them when it comes time to turn the car in, with the 18700 residual.
 

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GM Kid said:
For those of us who care about our cars, a new vehicle is stressful, isn't it?

But don't let this stuff get you down. I think most of the stress is that we expect "new" to equal "perfect," and it just doesn't. Whenever you buy a new car, you invariably find all sorts of stuff wrong with it during the getting-acquainted period. If you don't, well, you're not looking closely enough!

I'm still finding stuff on mine after a month or so. I never like it when I do, but the trick is not getting the forest mixed up with the trees. The trees are the problems. The forest is . . . YOU OWN A GTO! You'll find the proper cubby holes in your brain in which to stick the various defects you're coming across; stick 'em in there and let 'em collect dust. Just don't forget how much that "5.7" or "6.0" badge means, and what an awesome car the GTO is overall.

Another coping strategy: Always differentiate between legitimate problems and mere imperfections. Problems need fixing. Fix 'em and be done. Imperfections you can't really do anything about . . . and even if you can, realistically, you're not going to. So be done with those, too, and put your mind at ease.

And then settle into a nice, long, happy ownership period in which you KNOW about your car's troubles, but you just don't care because you're having too dadgummed much fun!
after taking 6 inches out of my front fascia, i had to deal with this! great way to put it! thanks!!
 

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The paint on the goat is really thin. The interstate highways are terrible where I live and I had small stone chips within a couple of weeks. When I added the banchee hood the shop used a PPG paint and I have had no trouble with chips since. The wifes goat is has also developed some chips on the hood. GM area reps are really fighting hard to keep from doing anything about paint problems too, but her hood will be repainted next week. If you look closely you may also find some small dark specs on your paint. Little drops of resin that were dropped while installing rubber molding. My car had some on the hood trunk and top.
 
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