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I think I might be in need of a new battery for my 1966 Pontiac Gto...Over the last many years I’ve purchased a fairly inexpensive battery. They don’t seem to last very long. I do know that in the United States there’s only a couple battery manufactures so I thought it really didn’t matter. I’m interested to hear from you guys on this issue. Thanks for your response.
 

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I like interstate run in the truck and gto with no issues. The warranty they carry I think nobody can beat
 

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I think I might be in need of a new battery for my 1966 Pontiac Gto...Over the last many years I’ve purchased a fairly inexpensive battery. They don’t seem to last very long. I do know that in the United States there’s only a couple battery manufactures so I thought it really didn’t matter. I’m interested to hear from you guys on this issue. Thanks for your response.
How long is "not very long"? If you're consistently getting significantly less life than the battery's rating (only 24 months out of a 48 month battery, for instance) maybe something else is going on. A short? An alternator that can't keep up with the load? Car sitting idle and not being started for long periods of time? If you don't have one already, you might consider using a battery tender to keep the battery up if the car sits unused for long periods of time.

Just random thoughts...

Bear
 

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I was thinking the same thing Bear... It does sit for long periods of time and I am going to start putting a trickle charger on it once I get this thing charged back up. But just for general discussion when it comes time to replace it if there’s a recommendation you have that would be helpful also...thanks..
 

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I was thinking the same thing Bear... It does sit for long periods of time and I am going to start putting a trickle charger on it once I get this thing charged back up. But just for general discussion when it comes time to replace it if there’s a recommendation you have that would be helpful also...thanks..
Like yourself, I usually go with an inexpensive battery and use it till it quits.
 

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Delco gold for all my cars. I use the same side terminal in my 06 Silverado and 70 El Camino.
El Camino has a trickle charger and has been in use almost 5 years now.
Replaced the one in the Silverado with another Delco after 11 years and it was still working when I did. But I figured it was time.
 

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I always buy AC Delco. Agree with O52 above on using a Delco Gold. I just replaced the orig. battery in my 2015 Impala with one.
For my 66 GTO I put this Delco top post in 8 yrs ago and it's been perfect. I'm in Michigan and I leave it in the car year round. When it's sitting in my cold garage through the winter I leave a Battery Tender Plus hooked up.


Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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My shop has been selling batteries since cars started having them....probably the biggest name in car batteries.
There is no reason not to get a decade out of a wet cell lead acid battery.
What kills most batteries is sitting. You cannot let a battery sit discharged. The lead dissolved off the plates with bond with the sulfur from the acid creating lead sulfate which is the end of your battery.
Batteries need to be kept charged. I mean >90% charged ALL the time. Deep discharges of a starting battery, even if quickly recharged, damage them as well. You do not want to dissolve the plates.
The best answer is to get a multifunction charger. Higher charge rates when you do discharge one, slow rates to replate them and a float point mode to mainatin them. Many have desulfation cycles which can breath life back into damaged batteries. Best bet is to have a big charger and a small maintainer. The maintainer is just a small float point charger. A good one is Battery Tender.
Lack of a proper hold down is a very underrated reason for failure. Those plates in each cell are micro close to each other. Bouncing around causes them to touch. You can live with a few, but as more and more touch, you lose capacity. Also when they short they slough material which accumulates in the bottom of the cell. Eventually it reaches the bottom of the plates and that's it for your battery. Bouncing around also shakes up accumulated material and causes it to short some plates and contaminate others.
Heat. Heat kills batteries. All heat.
Poor connections cause low voltage which causes high amperage thus hot plates and too much degradation of your plates.
 

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Oh, and all the brands you see? There's really only 3 wet cell auto battery makers out there. 2 make about 80% of all batteries. JCI and East Penn.
That doesn't make all batteries equal...Chevy makes Corvettes and Chevettes...but most don't realize you're getting one or the other.
 

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Sounds funny but walmart Everstart Maxx battery... Cheap, work good and get the job done, and 5 year warranty... first 3 years warranty replacements are completely free, last 2 years have a prorated replacement warranty. Can’t go wrong with it.
 
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And remember a Battery at 12.6 volts is full charge, at 12.4 volts is 75% charged at 12.2 volts it is 25% charged!....

just having 12 volts on your meter does not mean the Battery is at full strength...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And remember a Battery at 12.6 volts is full charge, at 12.4 volts is 75% charged at 12.2 volts it is 25% charged!....

just having 12 volts on your meter does not mean the Battery is at full strength...
Just learned today about the two different kinds of batteries that are out there now. One is the old fashion lead cell battery. The other one is some kind of new product that is flat on the top and no way to fill the cells with acid. That type I understand if you let it go down it most likely will not come back up. Didn’t know that I guess I should concentrate on when I replace it to get a acid feel led battery. Do you agree
 

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Just learned today about the two different kinds of batteries that are out there now. One is the old fashion lead cell battery. The other one is some kind of new product that is flat on the top and no way to fill the cells with acid. That type I understand if you let it go down it most likely will not come back up. Didn’t know that I guess I should concentrate on when I replace it to get a acid feel led battery. Do you agree
You are looking at an AGM. Absorbed Glass Matt. It's not really new technology, but it's a lot more widely used now. Same battery really, lead-acid, but the electrolyte is absorbed in a glass mat. Instead of a flooded battery where the plates are hanging in a bath of electrolyte. You might be familiar with an Optima battery and how it sort of looks like a 6 pack, Those are regular square/rectangular plates pressed together with the mat in between, then rolled up. A conventionally shaped AGM has square cells all pressed together with the mat in between, but standing on end like a regular flooded battery. There's quite a few advantages to these batteries, and a few disadvantages.
Very few flooded batteries have fillable cells. Virtually all are "maintenance free" You can't open them. So a "late model" flooded battery will look similar to an AGM due to this. But, if you look you will see where it was originally filled then sealed, where the AGM has no free electrolyte, thus never filled.
You will spend 35%-200% more for an AGM. It is worth it, if you follow the rules. They need a charger with an AGM cycle. While one of their chief strong points is resistance to discharge when sitting, sitting discharged is even more harmful to them than it is for flooded batteries. Sensitive to overcharging/high voltage
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A lot of information thank you. Which type of battery would you recommend for a classic car then?
 

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A lot of information thank you. Which type of battery would you recommend for a classic car then?
An AGM is a superior battery. Don't let it (or any battery) sit discharged. If it gets discharged, your charger needs to have an AGM setting.
Keep those 2 in mind and you get a battery that has higher reserve capacity. Is resistant to discharging. Is resistant to physical damage. Generally lasts longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have a battery charger it’s a pretty good one from Sears that I bought years ago. Has a two amp slow charge setting a fast 40 amp setting and a starting setting at 200 amp. I’m assuming this old charger will not be sufficient or do the job for the AGM battery.
 

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I have a battery charger it’s a pretty good one from Sears that I bought years ago. Has a two amp slow charge setting a fast 40 amp setting and a starting setting at 200 amp. I’m assuming this old charger will not be sufficient or do the job for the AGM battery.
If it's an earlier one that's not microprocessor based it probably is not going to be suitable for an AGM battery. If yours is a Sears and has a setting for "Diehard Platinum" then it's perfect. Pretty sure yours won't, nor will it have an AGM setting.
Don't set it to 40 amps and hook it to an AGM....no bueno.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the info buddy appreciate it. I may have killed this battery cause I did have it on the 40 amp setting for a while. I’ll check the condition of the battery today. I do have it on a trickle charger though.
 

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Thanks for the info buddy appreciate it. I may have killed this battery cause I did have it on the 40 amp setting for a while. I’ll check the condition of the battery today. I do have it on a trickle charger though.
Batteries like trickle charge. Unless they're starting from a very low charge state. You need some amps in that case to "get them up off the floor" so to speak. Start with a fast charge then slow to a trickle, then leave a maintainer on it.
 
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