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I'm curious as to the general thought to adding options to a 68 that didn't have them. I see very few options like power windows, power door locks, power seats, outside mirror control, etc. Yes I do see them but very seldom on cars for sale. I'm starting the search process to find my old 68 but if I can't find it, than a close proximation. But if I can't find my original one, which is doubtful, then I really would like one the way I would have ordered it if I could now. So the question is adding hidden headlights I'm sure is a pain not worth doing. But things like the windows, door locks, seats, hood tach, power antenna, trunk release seem pretty easy, but are they really and does it have major affect on the ultimate resale value. How about drilling holes for hood tach, and adding the 69 judge rear spoiler? Power disc brakes? Obviously, it's best to find one with most of the wish list, but I know I won't find all my wishes.

Would like to learn from others experiences before I jump head first.
 

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Easy to add options; i.e. ones that are easy to remove on a fairly rare car to return it to stock, most owners and buyers don't have a problem with. Adding a custom sport steering wheel, adding oem rally gauges and in dash tach, adding a period correct looking Pontiac AM-FM radio or stereo, all have been popular additions.

Adding correct pwr disc brakes set-ups can be a positive additions for many owners, but not all. Having pulled off partscars, rebuilt components, detailed, & installed & sold a ton of factory disc brake systems, they can add some value. However, like spending 80K on the modest pool addition and some patio work, when it comes time to sell your home, good chance the pool expense will not be recouped. Same deal on disc swaps. On factory disc changeovers, I've also removed a cutting edge Concours disc brake system off a very high performance factory built Pontiac, and the same was done to one of my customer's RA4 Judges, not only because each car was an original manual drum car, but because the disc system added near 30lbs of weight. Swapping to disc brakes isn't always the solution. Especially with special matrix brake shoes, stiffer return springs, and with my cryo'ed original drums, 4 wheel drums will stop either 3650 lb car fine at the track from 110 mph.

On pwr windows, they definitely add expense and weight. An easy $1000 expense and that's if one does the installation themselves. Personally, I wouldn't advise adding them, many of us see them as a negative on a Pontiac musclecar. Similar deal with a Judge rear spoiler, the side and rear 3/4 profile of a '68 just looks odd with a '69 Judge spoiler added. Years ago I picked up a perfect late '70 style Judge rear spoiler to put on an extra '71 decklid on my HO GT-37. Finally came to the realization, the GT-37's look "boy racer" enough with hood pins and stripes, no need to add an option that is not on the buildsheet. On hood tachs, have had quite a few factory hood tach cars over the years, and one of my keepers is a factory hood tach car. Personally, I prefer the factory dash tach. Factory dash tachs, can see fine, no fogging up, seldom not working. Adding a hood tach to a factory stick car ESP when you're going to have to source a repro hood for the driver type restoration of a non numbers car, don't really have a problem with that. Hacking a hole in a pristine original hood, ESP on a lower performance automatic car, I just don't get it, and know many others that think the same.

Best to you with the '68, whatever you do.
 

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My take on it is simple.

If the option was avaialble on that car in that year it can be added without any fuss. Likewise I'd take off an option if not available for that year/car. For example, some day I'll get rid of the windshield I have with the integrated antena and reinstall a rear power antena in teh rear quarter. Or on another car, truck actually, I added an OE center console because it was an option back in the day.

Bottom line is you need to figure out what type of guy you are (it's your car): 1. Bone Stock (nothing but what it came with), 2. "correct" parts guy (which means you can use era correct parts but not neccesarily for your vehicle), a resto-moder (add what ever you want as long as it works and is new) or any melding of those options. It's your car...:)
 

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The it's your car argument is flawed. Projects stall out, never get finished, then with all the mods, the end product does not appeal to as large a mass of buyers. Owners do pass away, lose interest and cars get sold. Have personally observed many Pontiacs that owners went wild tracking down and adding options, only to take a bath when the vehicle was sold. Many times have also witnessed a few easy additions, not hurt the value, and occasionally actually enhance the value. The dividing line is once one starts performing body modifications that are expensive to reverse.
 

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Yes and no... my take on it was in it's simplistic form - there are limitless permutations when modifying cars.

I've seen guys dump 20K into a $1,100 car or truck knowing they'll never get it back but that's what they want to do because "it's their car". :)

Regarding MickeyKelley's original post, I don't see any wild plans which would greatly affect resale value especially if he's smart and does a lot of the work him self - they certainly wouldn't be as bad as crazy body mods or huge engine plans like a pro street rocket ship...

The it's your car argument is flawed. Projects stall out, never get finished, then with all the mods, the end product does not appeal to as large a mass of buyers. Owners do pass away, lose interest and cars get sold. Have personally observed many Pontiacs that owners went wild tracking down and adding options, only to take a bath when the vehicle was sold. Many times have also witnessed a few easy additions, not hurt the value, and occasionally actually enhance the value. The dividing line is once one starts performing body modifications that are expensive to reverse.
 
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