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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone! I have been having a miserable time trying to repaint the interior passenger side window sill on a 67 GTO. If that is not the correct name for the part, I refer to the painted metal strip at the very top of the door, about 2-3 inches high, running the length of the door. I am now on my fourth attempt. The first three efforts went fine through the base coat: stripped to the metal, two coats of sandable primer, three coats of Krylon black semi-gloss. Then, the clear coat in all three attempts resulted in severe orange peel that I could not correct. To be clear, this orange peel was not the typical kind found when the coating dries and that can be pretty easily sanded out. The clear coat just about erupted when it contacted the base coat, resulting in orange peel, blistering, lumping, etc. To my eye, this looked like a chemical reaction for more than a temperature, humidity, nozzle flow issue. I tried two different brands, Krylon and Duplicolor, but the results were the same.

Right now, I've gone through those steps once again and the base coat finish is excellent - but I have no reason to expect I'll see different results with the clear coat. So, after all of that, has anyone had a similar experience and/or any idea of the cause? As importantly, being this is an interior application, I'm wondering if I can go without the clear coat and instead finish with Meguiar's Mirror Glaze Ultra and Synthetic Sealant. I've also read some very good reviews about Torque Detail Ceramic Spray, which at least appears to provide a deeper, harder coating.

I know this approach is unconventional, but in the words of Clint Eastwood: "A man just has to know his limitations." I've found mine and have had quite enough.

As always, any help is appreciated.
 

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You were seeing a reaction from the base coat hitting the primer...OR, the base coat color was being put on too thick, OR the coats were applied too close to each other (the latter is more likely). The last coat was trapping gaseous reactions that were happening beneath it. I base this opinion on the word "blistering". Check how long you should wait before applying the cleat coat over the base and cross your fingers. IMHO, spray bombs can be tricky to use, but I would clear over your base coat for the best results and if that fails...switch to using a paint gun. Spray guns are easier to use than spray bombs, but require some tool investment so, I understand the bomb route...I use a ton of them.
 

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...or the clear coat you're using is chemically incompatible with the color coat and is reacting to it. This kind of reaction is different from orange peel, instead it will look like the clear has formed tons of tiny wrinkles in the surface. Does your result look something like this?



That's wrinkling. There are multiple causes, such as not allowing the base coat to dry/flash long enough, spraying on too thick, too hot, too humid, even the aforementioned reaction between two coatings that are chemically incompatible.
 

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Hello, everyone! I have been having a miserable time trying to repaint the interior passenger side window sill on a 67 GTO. If that is not the correct name for the part, I refer to the painted metal strip at the very top of the door, about 2-3 inches high, running the length of the door. I am now on my fourth attempt. The first three efforts went fine through the base coat: stripped to the metal, two coats of sandable primer, three coats of Krylon black semi-gloss. Then, the clear coat in all three attempts resulted in severe orange peel that I could not correct. To be clear, this orange peel was not the typical kind found when the coating dries and that can be pretty easily sanded out. The clear coat just about erupted when it contacted the base coat, resulting in orange peel, blistering, lumping, etc. To my eye, this looked like a chemical reaction for more than a temperature, humidity, nozzle flow issue. I tried two different brands, Krylon and Duplicolor, but the results were the same.

Right now, I've gone through those steps once again and the base coat finish is excellent - but I have no reason to expect I'll see different results with the clear coat. So, after all of that, has anyone had a similar experience and/or any idea of the cause? As importantly, being this is an interior application, I'm wondering if I can go without the clear coat and instead finish with Meguiar's Mirror Glaze Ultra and Synthetic Sealant. I've also read some very good reviews about Torque Detail Ceramic Spray, which at least appears to provide a deeper, harder coating.

I know this approach is unconventional, but in the words of Clint Eastwood: "A man just has to know his limitations." I've found mine and have had quite enough.

As always, any help is appreciated.

Welcome to "spray bomb" painting. This has been covered in the past and experienced by myself in an attempt to paint my engine pulleys - over, and over, and over, etc. LOL

The "new" paints are reformulated to meet EPA requirements so they have different solvents/dryers in them. So you do as you would have done in the past, and then all of a sudden you watch the paint crinkle, spider, check, or bubble up. So you again, do what you did in the past, sand the paint down smooth and apply another coat of paint figuring this will do it, and it looks good, smooth, shiny, and you walk off. Then you come back to check out your quality re-work only to find the paint did that same %4&&$ thing. Alright, ok, its not too bad, just a few little bad areas, so you figure I'll let it dry, do a nice fine wet-sanding of the color coat and I'll lay down some clear on top of the color coat and it'll fill in, blend, and hide those few little hard to see imperfections that you can see, but now one else will. It's been a week now, color coat should be nice and dry, you wet sand it fairly easy which lets you know, "I got it this time." Yeah buddy, you grab that rattle can of deep high-shine poly clear and lay on the best coating of your life over that color coat. Fantastic! You might even be thinking of going into automotive painting as a living and quit your job looking at that quality application of that clear. Yepper, so now you go to clean things up with that big grin on your face and feeling like a million bucks. As you are snapping that plastic cap on the rattle can clear you walk towards that Rembrandt you just laid down on the door piece and....................Mu$%$ Fu$#&!!! :mad: The clear has crinkled up like the black crinkle paint you used to apply to valve covers. Even worse, you are staring down at crevices going down through the color coat as deep as the grand canyon. Good thing the cat ain't around because you would have given it a drop kick into the neighbors yard .... because you never liked the cat anyway. 🙀

Now, the answer to spraying rattle can paints? 1 of 2 ways. I have found that if you are going to paint something, paint your coats within a very short tacking time. Do your best to lay the part as flat as possible, don't stand/hang up a part if you can lay it down flat. It can be hard to judge the time in between coats sometimes, but I only give the part about 10 minutes and apply the next coat. The problem here is that if you lay the paint on too thick, it will run. Too thin, you get orange peel, shiny/flat areas, or a rough finish. Keeping the part flat/level can be your friend. The painting will also include your clear coat - shoot it all.

The 2nd way to do this is simply more time. With each coat of paint applied, set it aside for 2 weeks, yes 2 weeks. This is what it seems to require for all the solvents to gas out and dry. The you can scuff/wet sand lightly and apply the second coat. Let it dry at least 2 weeks - maybe a little more if you put clear on it. Then scuff/wet sand lightly and apply that final clear coat. BUT, be careful that you do not lay the stuff on too thick or too wet - it will react with the paints underneath, the solvents may soften the color coats, and guess what? You simply take down that panel to your local sign/vinyl/wrap company and have then install an adhesive vinyl panel on your part the color you want and be done with it.

You can also bring your panel to an auto repair shop and let them spray it with automotive paints which will not give them all the problems you have been experiencing - but this is the best way to go unless you have your own spray paint equipment and can buy/apply the auto paint yourself.

My water pump pulleys look good, but did not come out the way they should have as in days past. Why does this have to be so difficult? I figure, who will see those minor flaws in the paint when the engine is running? You gotta know when to call defeat. (y)

**** luck! ;)
 

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I did mine in single stage semi-gloss lacquer on the '65 in 1983 and in single stage semi gloss on the '67 in 1993. Both still look great. Clear coat does not belong on interior surfaces of these cars, particularly in the semi gloss and flat areas. Spray it with single stage, color sand, polish, and you're good to go for the next 30-40 years.
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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Hello, everyone! I have been having a miserable time trying to repaint the interior passenger side window sill on a 67 GTO. If that is not the correct name for the part, I refer to the painted metal strip at the very top of the door, about 2-3 inches high, running the length of the door. I am now on my fourth attempt. The first three efforts went fine through the base coat: stripped to the metal, two coats of sandable primer, three coats of Krylon black semi-gloss. Then, the clear coat in all three attempts resulted in severe orange peel that I could not correct. To be clear, this orange peel was not the typical kind found when the coating dries and that can be pretty easily sanded out. The clear coat just about erupted when it contacted the base coat, resulting in orange peel, blistering, lumping, etc. To my eye, this looked like a chemical reaction for more than a temperature, humidity, nozzle flow issue. I tried two different brands, Krylon and Duplicolor, but the results were the same.

Right now, I've gone through those steps once again and the base coat finish is excellent - but I have no reason to expect I'll see different results with the clear coat. So, after all of that, has anyone had a similar experience and/or any idea of the cause? As importantly, being this is an interior application, I'm wondering if I can go without the clear coat and instead finish with Meguiar's Mirror Glaze Ultra and Synthetic Sealant. I've also read some very good reviews about Torque Detail Ceramic Spray, which at least appears to provide a deeper, harder coating.

I know this approach is unconventional, but in the words of Clint Eastwood: "A man just has to know his limitations." I've found mine and have had quite enough.

As always, any help is appreciated.
Why do I feel like Ive seen this thread before?

Anywho... Krylon primer might be your issue.

You need to adhere to compatibility... You cant prime in enamel and then coat in lacquer... Krylon and Duplicolor are not the same formulation. Make sure to use the same brand and type of paint and primer, to ensure compatibility.

Ive been doing this for over 35 years. I would use acrylic enamel.
 

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Why do I feel like Ive seen this thread before?

Anywho... Krylon primer might be your issue.

You need to adhere to compatibility... You cant prime in enamel and then coat in lacquer... Krylon and Duplicolor are not the same formulation. Make sure to use the same brand and type of paint and primer, to ensure compatibility.

Ive been doing this for over 35 years. I would use acrylic enamel.
Hello, everyone! I have been having a miserable time trying to repaint the interior passenger side window sill on a 67 GTO. If that is not the correct name for the part, I refer to the painted metal strip at the very top of the door, about 2-3 inches high, running the length of the door. I am now on my fourth attempt. The first three efforts went fine through the base coat: stripped to the metal, two coats of sandable primer, three coats of Krylon black semi-gloss. Then, the clear coat in all three attempts resulted in severe orange peel that I could not correct. To be clear, this orange peel was not the typical kind found when the coating dries and that can be pretty easily sanded out. The clear coat just about erupted when it contacted the base coat, resulting in orange peel, blistering, lumping, etc. To my eye, this looked like a chemical reaction for more than a temperature, humidity, nozzle flow issue. I tried two different brands, Krylon and Duplicolor, but the results were the same.

Right now, I've gone through those steps once again and the base coat finish is excellent - but I have no reason to expect I'll see different results with the clear coat. So, after all of that, has anyone had a similar experience and/or any idea of the cause? As importantly, being this is an interior application, I'm wondering if I can go without the clear coat and instead finish with Meguiar's Mirror Glaze Ultra and Synthetic Sealant. I've also read some very good reviews about Torque Detail Ceramic Spray, which at least appears to provide a deeper, harder coating.

I know this approach is unconventional, but in the words of Clint Eastwood: "A man just has to know his limitations." I've found mine and have had quite enough.

As always, any help is appreciated.
I had the same problem painting the dash on my '65. Using rattle can etching primer from Eastwood, Rustoleum black, and Rustoleum semi-gloss clear. Drove me crazy. After multiple attempts with varying cleaning methods and flash times, I gave up on the cans & ordered some "rat-rod" black from Eastwood and sprayed it with my gun. It came out great & I was able to move on......
 

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i know it is easier to just grab a rattle can. sometimes i have gotten great results. if you got alot of things to spray or like to fix old cars often it is a good investment to get a small spray gun and small compressor. you never really know what you are spraying from a rattle can. it can save lots of time and frustration. some of these rattle cans can get a little pricey. but we work with what we have and thats ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello everyone! I wanted to thank everyone for their insights and apologize for neglecting to do so earlier.

For those interested, the problem seems to have been a reaction between the clear and base coats. I adopted two solutions. First, as suggested, I opted not to use clear. Second, I made certain the primer and base were compatible and from the same company, in this case, rustoleum. Stripped to the metal yet again, 2-3 coats of primer, 2-3 coats of base. Got some pimpling - not sure if it was orange peel - and a little clay corrected 95% of the problem. A little fine grit sanding took care of the rest. Carnauba wax, then Torque detailer, and finally Mequire's synthetic shine. Finished with buffer and polisher. Came out perfectly. Wouldn't have gotten there without you folks. Tanks again!
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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Hello everyone! I wanted to thank everyone for their insights and apologize for neglecting to do so earlier.

For those interested, the problem seems to have been a reaction between the clear and base coats. I adopted two solutions. First, as suggested, I opted not to use clear. Second, I made certain the primer and base were compatible and from the same company, in this case, rustoleum. Stripped to the metal yet again, 2-3 coats of primer, 2-3 coats of base. Got some pimpling - not sure if it was orange peel - and a little clay corrected 95% of the problem. A little fine grit sanding took care of the rest. Carnauba wax, then Torque detailer, and finally Mequire's synthetic shine. Finished with buffer and polisher. Came out perfectly. Wouldn't have gotten there without you folks. Tanks again!
Glad it worked out! I love it when people get good advice, and take it! That's seems to be rare these days.
 
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