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Hello so been shopping around for a complete power disc brake conversion for my 69 gto and so far I found inlinetube.com pretty much has everything I need to do a complete change over with all new OEM brakelines, spindles, calipers, brake booster, master cyclinder etc... only issue I heard was the brake lines are not 100% drop in and need to be fitted but so far all parts and shipping would be $1300 as I will be doing the labor myself. Does anyone have any better recommendations or have used these guys before?
 

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Inline Tube kit has nice prebent lines, a choice of stock metering valve setup or their conversion setup which uses an integral proportioning valve mounted in line under the disc master cylinder. Have bought lines through Inline many times, never had a problem with installing them.

Personally, have examined several poorly machined disc spindles made from Chinesium and I am very wary of using such "new spindles. That previous lack of quality in the spindle is why in a stock geometry front disc swap, I always go with #1 condition nice used disc spindles, then expand out from there for the remaining parts depending on what is asked for in a disc swap, i.e.; Manual Disc, Pwr disc, Concours restored booster, single piston calipers, stainless resleeved 4piston calipers with 2 piece rotors...many different ways to go.
 

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Ps I would get the steel and not the stainless though..a little easier to work with and hey the original steel lasted 50 years...
 

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I used all new stainless lines from InLine tube on my system for my 69. There's a trick to making the stainless easier to work with if for some reason you need to cut it and add fittings (like I did to add the in-line Wilwood adjustable proportioning valve). *DON'T* use a regular tubing cutter to cut the line. The pressure from the roller will tend to work-harden the metal at the cut, making it harder to flare and easier to split. Instead use a cutting tool like a plain old hacksaw or even better, a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel. It makes a big difference.

Bear
 

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Excellent point made by Bear. I tried flaring a stainless steel fuel line recently after cutting it with my tubing cutter and could not do it successfully. It work-hardened the area and it would just keep splitting. Unable to figure out a solution, I installed a rubber splice, shade-tree style. You can't do that with a brake line, though!
 
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