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OK guys I've got a dilemma. My 67 GTO is a frame on restoration. All the parts are roughly correct but obviously not numbers matching. The engine is out of a 73 trans-am or something like that. Engine block - 73-74 YT Code 400CI. Heads – 4X 7H stamped heads CAST in 1973 chamber volume- 98cc valves 2.11/1.66. Compression as I've calculated is 8.5 or thereabouts.

I want to have more power and work the engine over a little. Some of the things ive come up with.

OPTION 1: I was looking at putting on a set of 670 heads which would be correct for the year. of course this means a complete rebuild with new dished pistons or alot of head work to enlarge the chambers.

OPTION 2: Hunt down a YS block and 670 heads and do it from scratch to be a correct but not numbers matching.

OPTION 3: just get an edelbrock set up heads, cam, intake, etc.

I'm also trying to think about resael value and what would be the best way to go. The car is actually for sale now (27000 in barstow CA ;)) but I'm not that motivated and I still keep putting money in her.

Thanks for the wisdom.

Jesse
 

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For 27k, the car would have to be a numbers matching car or close in this economy. So, for maximum value, getting the 'correct' engine, parts, etc. would be the way to go. Depending on your budget, and what you really want to do, you would get the most performance bang for the buck by forgetting the numbers and going with whatever parts work for you. 670 heads are the last ones I would use on the street....great heads, but designed for 100 octane on up. You would be much better off with a good set of '68-up open chambered heads in the 85-90cc range, a decent cam, and the stock intake and q-jet. Less $$$ spent, and good performance. Edelbrock heads are great, but expensive, and Edelbrock carbs are vastly inferior to the Rochester Q jet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply geeteeohguy. If I got the 670's then I would basically be looking at a rebuild or a new block that is correct for the year. I suppose I am more concerned about the resale prospects farther down the road. The way I see it is the stock performance, or close to it, is good enough for me. But it seems that people are generally interested in all numbers matching or a complete resto-mod/touring car. Mine is neither. I've got a 600 holley now. would you recommend finding a q-jet?

Also did you get out the Pamona swap meet this weekend. more GTO's than I normally see out there.
 

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Jessek,

If you primarily care about your resale value, I would search for a YS engine. The YS stamp is very noticeable and is often checked when your hood is up. However, this is your car, so the choice is yours. I would get a good stroker kit, lower the compression to be pump gas friendly, and build a torque monster.

This is the route I am choosing, appear factory stock as a 68 WS car, but have modern internals for extra grunt. Just my little cents
 

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Numbers matching cars are seldom used as they should be. All of you here who do use yours, don't internalize my meaning. We see cars like that bringing **** high collector money but a true enthusiast wants to live it. My 65 has a 66 short block with a correct 65 top end. If everything else was deliciously restored should I truly expect my car's value to be 1/2 what the car with proper stamps on the block is? Even with PHS docs that show my car's reality? My car's original short block is probably part of a Kia or resides in someone else' car or simply got blown to smithereens because it was a, wait for it, here it comes, A MUSCLE CAR. I've been in the car business for the better part of 43yrs. Painted my 1st complete at 14, now 57 and I'm still at it. In all those years I've seen one thing sell with obvious consistency. QUALITY. It has to be the 1st thing on the list. Give your car the appearance of OEM, use all the restoration cues you can, forget the numbers matching thing unless you want to write a book or a blog about how you scoured the USA looking for your car's OG powerplant. Forget fads too. Pro Touring will surely go the way of Pro Street some day and it may happen sooner than later. What's the latest? Ever hear the term "Day 2 car"? That idea is gaining steam fairly quick and it makes perfect sense. It's what we saw back then. My favorite Camaro is a 67 4spd 396 car. It has to have 6 and 8 inch Ansen Sprints, a sinister stance, a nice dark color, and even a vinyl top wouldn't be a deal breaker. Yup, just like my bud's big brother had. I'm close with my 65 as a favorite GTO, but a 67 much the same way in gold with a black vinyl top and an automatic and a his n hers fitted with a T handle. I shoulda bought it at $1100 (!). Yeah, that was in the mid 70s but I recall it very well. I couldn't begin to tell you if either still had their original motors in place.

I simply spilled all of this to share some ideas, to maybe help remove the importance that others sometimes put out there. Quality sells. Quality lasts. It makes for fond memories and true good times, both in the build and the use. All the best to ya.
 

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VERY well put, 666bbl, and absolutely true. Quality lasts, and never goes out of style, either. Folks can keep their 24" wheels and granite counter tops.....I'll take a black '40 Ford coupe with steelies and a dual-carbed flathead!!
 

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I faced the same delema with my '65 drop top - the original drive train was long gone before I got the car and I waited 30 years before I built it because in my mind it had to be a perfect car - I finally built it keeping it looking close to stock with a '70 455. I'll leave the museum pieces to someone else and just enjoy my car
 

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Agree with 666bbl, these cars were built to be driven, and many of them were driven hard and put away wet when they were purchased. After nearly 50 years i'm sure many of our cars are on their third or fourth blocks, especially if they were used as originally intended, to beat up on Chevy's, Fords and Mopar's.

Unless your car is a rare option or "special" car i can't see the value in searching down a numbers and date correct block when the values are in the dumps. I would not really want to have a perfect, numbers matching, 100 point car. I haul trailers during the week for construction, last thing i would want to do on the weekend is haul my car around so i can drive it on and off another trailer.

I find it way more fun to hop in, fire it up and put some heavy wear on the tires, and not worry if my undercarriage gets a stone chip. If along the way i toast this block i have a virgin 400 out of a 70' firebird with no ridge on the walls fluxed and bagged, ready to go.
 

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My numbers matching '67 GTO convertible is painted the wrong color and has never been restored. It's been in constant service since '67 and I have driven it weekly or more for the past 31 years. Never been apart, or out of commission. If it breaks, it gets fixed. Same story with my non-matching '65. Both of mine have driver paint and wear and tear. Both have original chrome and stainless. Cars were meant to be driven and enjoyed...matching numbers or not. I don't know of a single person on this forum that has a hissy fit over a non correct numbers water pump or alternator. I am thankful for that. Those guys belong at car shows sitting in lawn chairs next to their trailer queens. Wearing out tires and burning gas is our idea of a better time.
 

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If you're going for resale I'd make it original as possible... that being said, I don't understand why anyone would sell one of these cars. I daily drive mine, at least for the time being, sure I could probably sell it for $15k, but cash doesn't put a smile on my face like driving the Goat does.

*Edit: unless it's free cash... I'm currently accepting donations to the "paint Indecision's GTO fund."
 
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