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I used it on a 55 ford rear end and aluminum drive shaft I did, and it was easy to use and I liked the outcome. I used it on the cap of the rear diff. I'll see if I have a photo of the drive shaft somewhere.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I am catching up on my posts. A lot has happened.

First, my axle shop was able to weld the control arm mount on my axle and recondition it. It looks like it should hold, but we will see. He replaced all seals, bearings, and races. He checked out the posi unit and said it was fine. Since the ring and pinion were fine, I had him leave the 2.93 gears in there. As this thing sucks the money, I decided to not unnecessarily replace parts. So, I guess I won't be able to smoke away tires indiscriminately. Maybe not a bad thing.

I did the frame with POR15. I did the whole process, starting with their cleaner. As the frame was blasted, it really wasn't too greasy and I thoroughly rinsed it afterward. I then used the metal prep etching. This leaves a zinc powder on the frame. It was a little unclear if you were supposed to wash this all off or leave it. The POR15 instructions say that if you are using the POR15 Rust Preventive paint, the zinc is the best surface preparation for that product, but also said it should be thoroughly washed. I did wash off the frame, but not to the point it removed all the zinc.

I then applied a couple coats of the black POR 15 Rust Preventative paint. I just applied it with a cheap brush and it really turned out great. The brush marks smoothed out great and was easy to apply. That was the good news.

I then applied the top coat. This was a completely different story. This was much thicker and was very difficult to put on smoothly. I thinned the second coat with the POR15 thinner, but still ended up with brush marks. Kind of sad after how good it looked before the top coat. I figured I would sand and reapply for any areas that looked bad after I assembled it. I really primarily did this for rust prevention.

One more thing about the POR15 system. A previous post said that the finish appeared chalky without the top coat. What I found is even after the top coat, you could get a chalky appearance if you touched it before it was cured. Not sure if it was picking contaminants off of my gloves or the zinc was coming to the surface.

Here is a picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I had my transmission rebuilt and already have it back. Thankfully, there were no bad surprises. He did say that it had a mild shift kit in it and he left it there. The transmission will probably be sitting for a while as I am pretty far from being able to put it in.

I took my engine into the machine shop and received great news there too. No major problems. Overall, it was in really good shape. I do have to have a .030 bore and the crank has to be ground .010 under. The heads and block were both flat and did not need any milling.

So now for the holy wars. I have been reading a lot about what to do with the engine and as you can imagine, I have received a lot of opinions. Here is what I am planning. Let the opinions fly.

First off, I don't plan on racing this engine either on the street or strip. That's not to say I won't ever get my foot into it, but only to feel that "youthful exuberance" as others have said.

I plan to leave the 670 heads basically stock, reusing the intake valves, springs and rockers. This is on advise of the machinist who says they are all fine. He did install hardened seats and we will be installing new exhaust valves. I wanted stainless steel valves, but finding them was easier said than done. I am letting the machine shop source them and if they can't find them, I may just end up with chrome steel.

I am also going to re-use the push rods after replacing the bolts with ARP bolts and getting them magnafluxed. I don't plan many trips beyond 5000 rpms, let alone 6000, so I figure it should be fine. We will see.

I am using ICON FHR series forged pistons. They are flat top pistons, but the valve reliefs give a +10.8 CC dish to lower compression. Based on my machinists calculations, it should be around 9.3:1 compression. This should be good as I am at altitude, about 5300 feet.

I plan to get the EX260H Comp Cam. The plan is to keep all the torque in the lower range.

Let me know what you think.

I do have a question. Summit has a kit with tappets and a double roller timing set. I have had some say that I shouldn't use a double roller set. What, if anything, should I be concerned about there?
 

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Discussion Starter #26
One more post for the evening. I am about to buy my sheet metal. I found a source for US made steel, which I have read is thicker, but the person I talked to at Columbia parts said the fit is not as good as the imported metal.

I am torn between better fit and thicker metal. I am not very experienced at welding, so I am attracted to better fit and more of a stock look, but the thinner metal also could be a concern for burning through, etc. I did purchase a new MIG welder (Lincoln 140) and plan to practice my MIG welding before actually starting to weld them in.

For those with experience, what do you think? Thicker metal or better fit?

Also, has anyone used Columbia Parts? I found them on Ebay, but I can order from them directly, so they can bundle shipments, etc.
 

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Dan, when you say sheet metal, are you talking about patch panels? I think original is 20 gauge. Closer you are to that the better. Have you looked at AMD? Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I had not looked at AMD, but just did. Maybe I am missing something, but they don't appear to have some of the patches I need such as a full trunk kit and the panels under the rear seats.
 

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Dan, I would give them a call to see if they can help you. I have had a good experience with them so far and I have not seen anything negative about their products. Matt
 

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I am catching up on my posts. A lot has happened......
Dude, you are flying along on this thing! We started about the same time with our '67's and I haven't even started thinking about engines and trannys. I don't think our 2 '67 Turquoise GTO's will be making their debut at the same time! All looks good, seems like you are taking on more of your own body work than I am capable of, but I've taken on more mechanical (rebuilt my own rear end with new bearings, races, and posi unit). Between us we would make one good restoration team.

I even have the same harbor freight rolling stool!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Since my last posts, I have purchased most of the patch panels and started to replace the front passenger side. I need to get all the panel work done so I can get it out to body work and paint. It will be quite a while before I get the panel replacements done as I am going to take my time and learn as I go. I purchased a Lincoln 140 welder for the job.

I kind of stopped that work for a while to think it through and decided to get cleaned up and organized. That meant taking care of many of the parts laying around and getting in the way. So the first thing I did was rebuild the new disk brake assemblies I purchased for the car. They turned out pretty good.

I also got my engine back from the machine shop, but that will have to wait for a while until I finish the body. I am really looking forward to starting to build it.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
It has been 4 months since my last post. I have still been working on my car, but just haven't had time to post anything. That dirty four letter word (work) kept getting in the way. Summer is also a very busy time. I have only had my boat out 3 times and I had to force myself to do that. Not good.

I have completed welding in the two front floor panels. Now, what was way too many holes, is just about the right amount. I still have some holes to position and drill as well as a lot of grinding.

I had to get the front panels in so I could get it mounted on the rotisserie as I am using the four front body mount holes to mount it. I had to get the front panels welded in for support.

Once I get the rotisserie set up properly, I will be tackling the trunk.

I also got the doors, fenders, hood, deck lid, and valence pieces blasted. The hood is in excellent shape and the doors are as well. The doors will require some rust repair, but the skins are in great shape with no Bondo. Both fenders will need rust repair behind the wheel well, and the driver's side is pretty rough. I may look for a replacement as it is a Tempest/LeMans fender anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
One more post for the night. The two front panels I used were AMD panels. Like other people who have posted about these panels, I had to do quite a bit of metal work to make them fit.

The passenger's site was not too bad, but the driver's side along the firewall had to be completely reshaped. Also when I put them both in, they did not meet in the center, so I had to make patches to fill in the gap.

One other major modification I had to make was where the bump-out was for the body mount bolt. The way the panels came was WAY too high. It would not meet the cross member and left a big gap, around a 1/2 inch. I had to cut and remove material to get it to meet correctly.

I am sure this is nothing new to anyone else who has done this, but I thought I would share my experience.
 

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Thanks. I have been watching yours too. Great progress. I am a little jealous. I won't say I am discouraged, but with all the metal work I have to do (and being a novice), the progress has really slowed.
 

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Thanks. I have been watching yours too. Great progress. I am a little jealous. I won't say I am discouraged, but with all the metal work I have to do (and being a novice), the progress has really slowed.
Yeah, but you're taking the bodywork to a whole new level. Someday next year I'll be paying someone to do it...

Mine will slow down now, budget constraints. Looks close but probably won't even fire it up 'til next Spring......
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I passed a major milestone in my restoration. I now have my body on the rotisserie and can spin it 360 degrees by myself.

I looked for information about rotisserie mounting and didn't find much, so I thought I would post some of the things I learned. Obviously, this is for a 67 GTO, so it only applies to that year.

The front is mounted in the 4 body mount holes. As you will see, I designed all the adjustment into the front rotisserie mount.

I couldn't find much about the pivot point. Mine is just below the center hole in the firewall (see last picture). It isn't the best angle, but there is no good way to take this picture. The pivot point is very important to ensure the body doesn't swing out of control.
 

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The rear mount was much more difficult. First, there is only one body mount you can use. I bolted the mount directly to that, but through a plate to help distribute the load. There is a second hole just outbound of the body mount hole that is not threaded but I was able to put a bolt inside for a little extra hold on the mounting plate and to keep the mounting plate from spinning.

Even with the mounting plate, when I lifted on the mount, it flexed more than I hoped, so you will see I welded a vertical plate on the mounting plate to ride on the body cross member. I also added a 2X6 that rides under the very back of the body.

This took care of the flex upward when the body was upright, but I was now worried about the leverage when the body was upside down. To fix that, I used a ratchet strap through the rear tail light assembly and over the rotisserie mount. Yes, I do plan to replace this, so if it causes any damage, I am OK with that. I don't know how you would do it if you didn't have that extra strap to hold it tight.

You might also notice the 7.5 lb plates front and back. I added these because the driver's side worked out to be just a little heavier. Once I added this weight, the body would stay wherever I put it, no matter where it was rotated.

I hope this helps someone doing a rotisserie in the future.
 

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Been watching your progress. I am restoring a 68 Lemans (also in Colorado) I received photos from the body shop yesterday and she is in primer, finally!!!
Was hoping to have it finished in time for the Pontiac Uprising in October out in Kansas, however unless Foose shows up with the A-Team I doubt that is happening! LOL


Love seeing your updates, keep em' coming!
 
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