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Discussion Starter #61
Interior Heater/AC Restore

I was doing some Craigslist searches and came across a 67 interior heater/AC assembly. The metal was shot, but the fiberglass was in excellent shape. Mine was just the opposite, so I bought it and proceeded to work on the restore. I have read that the fiberglass in good condition is very hard to find and he only wanted $50, so I jumped on it. I had to make a few fiberglass resin repairs, but nothing serious.

Here are some pictures I took of the results. I think it turned out pretty good. Probably overrestored for something no one will see, but oh well.

I don't have the heater core in it yet nor have I joined the two sides. I was going to get some rope putty before I bolted it all together to seal the two halves.

I am looking for recommendations on the heater core. I have the original Harrison, but I can tell it has already been repaired once. I am guessing it could be repaired again, but I don't want to put something in that will fail soon down the line. The other option is to get a replacement through NAPA. They still make them and they look like they are copper and aluminum, just like the original. I am just not sure if a new replacement would be more reliable than a fixed original. I obviously don't want to do a heater core replacement anytime soon. Please let me know what you think.
 

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The fiberglass has greyed out, if it isn't broken I would get the 2 part fiberglass resin and coat the plenum.
It is very brittle and if a passenger were to kick it there is a good chance it could shatter.
The original resin has deteriorated compromising the integrity of the fibers.
Mine was so bad I had to use cloth and resin after JB welding tabs and hinge pockets.
50 bucks was a steal for the unit, mine was 175 and I had to drive out to Twentynine Palms to pick it up.
The metal part had been butchered by some idiot who took tin snips to the core support to take the heater core out from inside the car.
I used the best parts from both plenums to restore mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
It amazes me when I get back to posting something on my car and realize how long it has been since I have posted anything. Sorry about that. I am making slow, but steady progress. It just seems that the little progress I make is not "news worthy". Hopefully, some fun things will start happening faster and I will post more.

Since my last post, I finally finished all of the floor panel replacements. I had a "move a body" party a couple of weekends ago and my friends and family helped me put the body back on the chassis, so I would have nice, straight alignment when I tackle the rear quarters, sail and back tail light panel.

I will pull the body off of the chassis again once I finish the quarters, so I can do the undercarriage finish and then it will go back on for good.

It will still be a while before it goes off to paint because I plan to paint the inside (POR 15) and the trunk before I send her off.
 

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Projects are just that. Have not touched my '68 in over a year and had expected to be way further along than where I am now. Other projects seem to come up and weather is a big factor for me without a garage and so far, this summer is starting to look like a repeat of last summer.......rain all summer. Its been raining for about 1 1/2 weeks now and going for 2 weeks according to the news. And of course, had to screw up a nice 3-day weekend hoping to get some work done on another project. :banghead:

I am thinking my 5-year plan might be 10, and by then I'll be ready for retirement and can work on it full time and knock it out - if my body & health holds up. Getting old 'ain't for pu$$y's. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #65
I hear ya. I am not getting any younger either. I thought this would be my first project. HA. I guess we will race to the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
I hung the doors so when I started pulling the rear quarters, I would have a reference so that I could get my gaps close. Then I removed the rear drivers side quarter. That was pretty difficult. The upper part of the quarter that tucks under the roof is actually welded on both sides to panels under the roof. I had to drill through two panels to get the quarter free, but that still wasn't all of it. Apparently, the quarter was welded in before the roof was put on, so it made it very difficult to get to all the welds.

I prepped the new quarter by adding the drip rail from my old quarter and adding the door strike brace. I also added all the trim pins and drilled all the holes based on templates I made from the original pieces.

I have just started to fit the new quarter in place. I still have quite a bit of work to do to get the new quarter to fit perfectly, but I am pretty happy for how it is fitting so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
In my last post, I was just starting to fit the new quarters, filler, and tail light panels. Since then, I have remediated all the rust I could now get to with the quarters and filler off. Once all rust was removed and/or repaired, I painted everything with POR 15 to seal it and stop any further rust. I prepared all weld locations with weld through primer. The attached pictures show everything prepared for the panels prior to me starting to weld. I have started some of the welding and will post more pictures when the welding is complete.
 

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To respond to one of your previous questions/posts about the $20k paint job: speaking as someone who did all his own body and paint work (because I myself got an $18k paint job quote from a restoration shop), I feel like I'm in a position to say that figure is not unreasonable. Yeah, you heard me right. Not unreasonable. Because now I understand how much time, labor, and effort goes into getting a high quality paint job. When someone says "it's all in the prep" - they're simultaneously telling the truth and making it sound a lot simpler than it really is. I'm talking hundreds of hours (literally) of priming, filling, guide coating, sanding, priming, filling, guide coating... all by hand (no machines allowed) just to get the body panels flat and straight. Then you apply one last coat of primer, wet sand the whole car (again by hand) with 600 grit to get all the previous sanding scratches out... all this just to get ready to start spraying material: sealer coat, color coats, clear coats. Done? Not hardly. After the clear is partially cured you get to start sanding again - the whole car - multiple times: 1000 grit, 2000 grit, 3000 grit... to get the surface of the clear coat "flat" and remove all the eggshell - this you can do with a 3/32" stroke random pattern air sander, if you're careful - but there's a very good chance that you'll break through the clear coat anywhere there's a sharp edge (in which case you get to start over and resand, respray the whole car) - so you'd best do those areas by hand and pray you still don't break through them. Once all the eggshell is gone, then you get to start in with the buffing compounds (2-3 different grades) for final finish and to bring out the gloss.

That's where the $20k goes. There aren't any shortcuts to getting a show quality paint job. It's not all THAT difficult in terms of the skill required, it's a significant investment of time and labor. What you're basically doing is paying someone else to care as much about your car as you do.

And, I can tell you again as someone who's done it all himself ---- I can tell you where every single paint defect is on my car, and they're there - trust me. Had I opted to pay the $18k I would have at least been in the position of being able to go back to the shop and say, "Hey, fix this". Now though, if I want those defects gone it's on me. (That's why they're still there :) )

Not that I'd do anything differently, I wasn't in a position to be able to pay that much for a paint job and still couldn't - probably never will be. Yeah, the car looks darn good, usually gets compliments on the paint at shows, and I'm kinda proud of being able to say that I did it all myself too. But to be brutally honest, it'd look better if I'd been able to spend the money.

Bear
Well said Sir....it really all depends on the level of paint you want, show, 3 footer, 10, footer. as bear said the prep is where you make it happen, i started with an all metal no rust body with just door dings and minor bumps. A few hundred hours latter i deemed it straight enough to spray. No smooth car is bondo free, it takes a skim coat and multiple sands with long block to geth the 7' body line on the back quarters straight, then you have to deal with a continuous arched panel from the line down. Bears post covers it and his paint finish speaks for itself!
Remember that the original paint was a one step lacquer and not Show quality. Even new cars have slight orange peel. I waited too long to clear sand and buff so it has a slight peel still but after 9 years i know the 4 coats of clear are on, bonded and hard as granite. If i ever get the energy to wet sand and buff another 10-15 hrs ill take it to show. I built it to drive and am glad i did it all myself, gives you a sense of pride and every time you drive them you get that 17 year olds smile.

My 66' is barrier blue(Bahama Blue Metalic) which looks like a close match to your original Blue.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
I finally took my car over to the painter last night. The painter seems almost as excited as I am to get this milestone completed, so hopefully that is a good sign. I will post some pictures as I get them. Pray for me that I don’t hit any of the horror stories we all have seen.
 
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