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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks again to any and all who have offered advice and information over the 2 years since I began my restoration. Those of you who have experienced a long restoration due to lack of spare time will appreciate my recent experience when I got the fuel flowing, the timing set and heard that 400 ci beast roar to life. I'm hoping I didn't cause any damage to the rebuilt engine by too much cranking and starting it with the timing off. I should be able to figure that out when I get exhaust on it later this week.

Meanwhile, I put on a CPP disc brake conversion while it was up on jack stands. When I tightened down the rear wheels they bottomed out against the calipers. I called CPP to see if there was a spacer or other product to solve the problem. they said I needed rally wheels that were made for disc brakes.

Meanwhile, to get it rolling I shimmed out the wheel studs with washers and did some grinding on the inside of the rim. Does anyone have any experience with this?
 

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64-67 Expert
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Yes. Lost a rear wheel on the freeway at 65 mph due to this back in the day. Ended up damaging the brake backing plate, drum, control arm, and quarter panel of my '66 GTO when the car slid on the body to a halt. Do NOT shim wheel studs. It destroys the integrity of the stud and you end up with a time bomb on your hands. Get the right wheels. Also, when you ran the engine, I you did run it at 2000 rpm for 20-30 minutes to break in the cam, didn't you?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
cam break in

The problem was that it ran for a bit before I could get it to idle long enough to set the timing. When finally fired up with everything firing, I revved it up to what I assumed was about 2 grand and kept it there for awhile. the next time I ran it, i did the same thing. Not very scientific but hopefully it did the trick.
 
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