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Damn! Where is Stuart, the PY Nazi? Good thing I am not a moderator here on the forums or I would have to ban a couple of you guys for life for being a troll or butting heads on the subject. I would have to ban the OP for 2 weeks because he was the one who posted the original question that turned into a slap fest.

So glad we are not PY. Heated differences are real world, right or wrong. At the end of the day, we are still GTO/Pontiac guys and will move forward to the next post.

"The amount of resistance in a wire increases when the wire is warm. GM engineering data shows about a 25% increase in resistance when wire temperature is increased from 70 degrees to 160 degrees F."

"Please note that simply disconnecting the original alternator wires, and then installing a heavy cable from the alternator directly to the battery, will only make the alternator effective as a “battery charger.” (That happens when running a ONE-WIRE alternator with many factory layouts.) Of course we have to charge the battery, but what about routing power from the alternator to the electrical system? (ignition, lights, and accessories) Power would have to flow from the battery to the junction via the old “charging wire.” And often in a factory-original type harness the “charging wire” is even longer than the wire from the alternator to the junction. And so the result of this ONE-WIRE method would be dimmer lights and overall weak electrical system performance; in fact often worse performance than with the original, correctly wired, small alternator that was standard equipment on the old cars."

ALTERNATOR WIRING KIT
For the GM alternator models:
CS-130 (1st generation)
&
CS-130D (late 1990’s, into the 2000 and …? years)

8 Feet Lengths of WIRE
  • Our Red, 8 gauge Tuff-Wire is used for the Out-Put circuit. A selection of 8 gauge wire terminals is included for the various options with wiring methods, which are all shown in the manual.
  • Our Red, 14 gauge Tuff-Wire is used for the “Remote Voltage Sensing” Hook-Up.
  • Dark Brown wire, which is the gauge size and color that GM typically used for the “Turn-On” & Warning Light circuit.

OTHER PARTS included in the package

  • A 12 gauge Fusible Link Wire kit is included for short-circuit/over-load protection of the 8 gauge Out-Put wire to the alternator.
  • A RESISTOR is included, which is calibrated to protect voltage regulator electronics (the regulator is within in the alternator).
  • A DIODE is included, which will be required with MSD 6A box ignition (and with many other similar types of ignition).
  • Wire terminals and shrinkable tubing is included for the work of wiring the plug-in connector circuits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks PJ, I don't want to tear apart the wire loom so I think I'll just add a #6 or #8 from the alternator to the battery but I still don't know if I should upgrade to a 140 amp alternator, I do have a lot stuff running so guess it can't hurt.
 

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Thanks PJ, I don't want to tear apart the wire loom so I think I'll just add a #6 or #8 from the alternator to the battery but I still don't know if I should upgrade to a 140 amp alternator, I do have a lot stuff running so guess it can't hurt.
add the total power consumption in amps. Then ,like you eluded to, if you have under 80 % capacity being used total, the 100 amp will be fine.

X2 with PJ one wire alternators suck

10 awg is fine for such a short run. 8AWG is easy enough to use. just overkill IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Ok, but it would give me an excuse to buy a nice black alternator 🤣 the 80% I referred to is for residential/commercial applications where if you have a 200amp panel the inspectors only want all of your possible load to equal 180 amps or they will flag it. But I'll go try and add everything up plus I have to remember it's not putting out 100 amps at idle or lower rpms I think it's somewhere around 4000 rpms right?
 

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remember the pulley on the alt is small so 4000 rpms on the engine is a LOT more at the alt
I do not recall what RPM the alt has to turn to achieve full output, but it is likely at or slightly below cruise rpm of the engine. remember the pulley ratio also changes things at the alternator as far as RPM of the alt
 

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So glad you are not a moderator P Jim LOL
If I was, then I could not be a "dick" or be part of a "passionate disagreement"........... and I hate "politically correct", "its all about the children", "its all about helping the underserved", "being told what I can say or can't say," "those who don't respect 'Freedom of Speech', "socialism", "lawyers", "government/state forced mandates that go against my personal choice", and eggs - I don't like their color, they're slimy, the cooked smell of rotten eggs,and that fact they come out of chicken's butts. I am OK with them in mixes like cakes and such.

LOL
 

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Some terminals are acc some are ignition, I'll get a picture tomorrow...but yesterday is the first time in 4 1/2 years that this has happened.
I think you’ve been lucky. And recent ‘perfect storm’ events prove that.
The fuse box was never intended for high amperage applications for a long operating time. Short time applications such as a convertible top or power windows are only used for a few seconds so they won’t overload the wiring.
You really should install a separate high amperage fuse panel powered by a 8-10 gauge wire from the battery. Mount it under the hood and control each component by a relay. Power for the relays can be controlled by toggle switches through the battery or accessory fusebox terminal since they are a low amperage components.
A better set up would have a thermostatic switch for the puller fans instead of a toggle switch.
Your current setup is marginal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Yes I have thought of an auxiliary panel because of what I've added and now it's probably time before something bad happens, I do have everything fused and I like having control with switches that are rated plenty for the fans. But you're right these old cars were never meant for all these extras I'm just not the best at wiring but I can figure it out eventually. What do you think about upgrading the alternator to a 140 amp? What about the stock regulator, it's new but I've heard about solid state ones. And is there some temperature that an alternator should be, I know the more load the hotter it runs and engine temperature effects it but I can never even touch it after driving it, it's as hot as the motor...maybe it's running hotter because of the small charge wire?
 

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The alternator will only put out what the demand is. For my car with only a radio and no other power options a 37 amp is more than enough.
Add 30 Amps for A/C, 30-60 amps for electric fans, xx amount for high powered entertainment systems and you can exceed 100 amps easily. A 140 won’t hurt anything Except your wallet. If I went that route I’d get the internally regulated alternator from a reputable source. No EBay crap. Lots of good sources explaining how to make it work and how to set up a relay operated system for your accessories.

 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Got it, thanks for all the help and I was looking at the same Tuff Stuff one I have maybe in black for 168.00...I'll go add up my load here and see where I'm at.
 

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This might help...I went through some similar surprise wiring issues when I upgraded my alternator and did an electric fan conversion


The stock alt wire was terrifying the way it was "stock" solder-spliced into the harness. Spent a lot of time correcting that and adapting the bigger gauge wire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
So another electrical question that I mentioned in a different post is I have to run a relay to get 12v to the coil because my new engine harness wasn't labeled that it had a resistor wire, so the relay worked good for a while then I would have to turn the key to acc to kill the motor so it was suggested here it might be worn out even after just two summer's so I installed a new one, it's a diode suppression relay and right out of the box sometimes it doesn't kill the motor and sometimes it does. It's not a big deal I suppose but just would like things to work as they should...any ideas of what's going on and how to cure it? It should be wired right or I would think it wouldn't work at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Ya it was a little crazy, so I just installed a #8 wire(because that's what I had in my shop and saved me from buying 25') from the alternator to the battery. But turns out that didn't help as when had the engine running I turned most things on then put my hand up inside on the ignition switch and a wire was getting hot, turns out it was the pink wire from the ignition switch for the dash lights. So my dumbass thought I could run three fans on that little wire,( queue the eye rolls and head shaking) idk what I was thinking but obviously not much. So I experimented by separating the pusher fans and puller fan and plugging them into separate extra spade terminals marked for courtesy glove box lamp and some other courtesy light, the pusher fan was ok it's 15amps and the fuse is a 20amp fuse stayed cool but the puller fans are 10amps each so that fuse didn't blow but was hot. I think the best bet is running a 10# wire from the battery to the fan switches since they're rated for 30amps each or is it better to run a relay for each set of fans? Then I'll have to look up how to wire the relays, like I said automotive wiring isn't my strong suit obviously.
 

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1972 Pontiac Lemans GTO
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Ya it was a little crazy, so I just installed a #8 wire(because that's what I had in my shop and saved me from buying 25') from the alternator to the battery. But turns out that didn't help as when had the engine running I turned most things on then put my hand up inside on the ignition switch and a wire was getting hot, turns out it was the pink wire from the ignition switch for the dash lights. So my dumbass thought I could run three fans on that little wire,( queue the eye rolls and head shaking) idk what I was thinking but obviously not much. So I experimented by separating the pusher fans and puller fan and plugging them into separate extra spade terminals marked for courtesy glove box lamp and some other courtesy light, the pusher fan was ok it's 15amps and the fuse is a 20amp fuse stayed cool but the puller fans are 10amps each so that fuse didn't blow but was hot. I think the best bet is running a 10# wire from the battery to the fan switches since they're rated for 30amps each or is it better to run a relay for each set of fans? Then I'll have to look up how to wire the relays, like I said automotive wiring isn't my strong suit obviously.
Well Bad at least you caught it before it turned for the worst. You will get it straight 👍
 

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As O52 posted previously this is what you need to do. Use relays to run these fans

I think you’ve been lucky. And recent ‘perfect storm’ events prove that.
The fuse box was never intended for high amperage applications for a long operating time. Short time applications such as a convertible top or power windows are only used for a few seconds so they won’t overload the wiring.
You really should install a separate high amperage fuse panel powered by a 8-10 gauge wire from the battery. Mount it under the hood and control each component by a relay. Power for the relays can be controlled by toggle switches through the battery or accessory fusebox terminal since they are a low amperage components.
A better set up would have a thermostatic switch for the puller fans instead of a toggle switch.
Your current setup is marginal.
 
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