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I'm finally the proud new owner of a 2005 (Thank you, thank you). I've got a minor squeak coming from the rear brakes. I am planning on taking the wheels off to see what's left of the pads. Reading the manual they make it sound like changing the brake pads is complicated. I've changed many a brake pad in my day, and it's never been complicated. Is this just to scare the average Joe into bringing it in to the dealer to pay top dollar? Reading on here, it sounds like there are some good options for upgrading the pads.
 

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One of the easiest things ive ever done. :lol:
Take the wheel off.
Get a C Clamp and squeeze the piston in.
Loosen the bottom bolt on the caliper.
Remove the top bolt on the caliper.
Swing the caliper up and pull the pads out.
Put the new pads in and put the caliper back over and tighten both bolts.
Done.

Make sure you pump the brakes when your done so the piston can push back out. Very easy. It may sound hard, but its much much easier than you think. If you have any questions let me know. Good luck!!:cheers
 

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So easy it isn't funny. Only hard part is that the rotors tent to be a pita because they don't wanna come off without a big ass rubber mallot. Once you get them off, use some sand paper or a file to get the rust off, then use anti seize.

1. remove wheel
2. remove caliper, 2 bolts
3. remove caliper bracket, 2 bolts
4. remove/replace rotor
5. calip bracket back on and lube slide pins
6. caliper back on and bleed it while your there
7. wheel

Just make sure your ebrake isn't on when you do the rears.
 

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One of the easiest things ive ever done. :lol:
Take the wheel off.
Get a C Clamp and squeeze the piston in.
Loosen the bottom bolt on the caliper.
Remove the top bolt on the caliper.
Swing the caliper up and pull the pads out.
Put the new pads in and put the caliper back over and tighten both bolts.
Done.

Make sure you pump the brakes when your done so the piston can push back out. Very easy. It may sound hard, but its much much easier than you think. If you have any questions let me know. Good luck!!:cheers
yeah what he said. just did mine 2 weeks ago . Used Wagner pads.
 

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So easy it isn't funny. Only hard part is that the rotors tent to be a pita because they don't wanna come off without a big ass rubber mallot. Once you get them off, use some sand paper or a file to get the rust off, then use anti seize.

1. remove wheel
2. remove caliper, 2 bolts
3. remove caliper bracket, 2 bolts
4. remove/replace rotor
5. calip bracket back on and lube slide pins
6. caliper back on and bleed it while your there
7. wheel

Just make sure your ebrake isn't on when you do the rears.
Rubber mallet?? Wholey crappin no-effect Batman!:eek:
I use a RBFH between the studs, takes skillz to not hit the wheel studs, but much more efficient/effective then a rubber mallet. ;)
 

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So easy it isn't funny. Only hard part is that the rotors tent to be a pita because they don't wanna come off without a big ass rubber mallot.
Changing the pads was a breeze. Getting to the rotors, not so much. Someone must have borrowed Superman's impact wrench to get those SOBs on.
 

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The rotors get siezed on with rust. I use a little grease so I can take them off the next time. Getting them off just use a block of wood and a BFH. Use the wood and hit around the rotor to even the distribution of force and so you won't damage the rotor.
 

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I never could figure out why shops charged more for disk brakes than drum. I think a myth of difficulty has emerged around disks, ain't so. I agree. Disk brakes are a breeze. Hope you haven't scored your disks.....FBH is definitely needed.
 

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Just to be clear, when you use a BFH to knock the rotors loose, you want to hit on the wheel mating surface, or the wheel flange, not on the braking surface, or were the brake pad surface is, which could cause damage to the rotor.



....and in some rear wheel disk brake applications where the emergency brakes operate through the same caliper there is a special tool that twists the caliper piston at the same time it compresses it. So, yeah, it can be a PITA, especially if you don't have the proper tools.
 

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rotor

I just got new rear rotors that I am going to put on but when i took off the caliper I wasnt able to get the caliper bracket to come off. The bolts wouldnt budge at all? DId anyone else have this problem.
 

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An 18"-24" is a must working on cars. Also hit it with some PB Blaster penetrant, tap it a little to work it in and let it sit for a bit to loosen it up. Disc brakes are one of the easiest things to do on a car.
 

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....and in some rear wheel disk brake applications where the emergency brakes operate through the same caliper there is a special tool that twists the caliper piston at the same time it compresses it. So, yeah, it can be a PITA, especially if you don't have the proper tools.
Yep, my Lincoln LS you have to turn and compress at the same time. Without the correct tool you are done, took my buddy hours to twist his back in. I got the loaner compressor tool from autozone and it was a breeze, compress a little, turn a little. They also have the caliper set at Harbor tool for $40.
 

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Had the same issue with rust when I changed the brakes last time. Block of wood and a hammer took care of it really easily, just be careful not to smack anything else on accident (obviously). Most unfortunate part of the whole process is trying to get your girl friend to help you bleed them properly afterwards!
 

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Had the same issue with rust when I changed the brakes last time. Block of wood and a hammer took care of it really easily, just be careful not to smack anything else on accident (obviously). Most unfortunate part of the whole process is trying to get your girl friend to help you bleed them properly afterwards!
If you don't 'open' the system, you don't need to bleed just for changing the pads and rotors.
Changing the calipers you DO need to bleed afterwards.
 

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I haven't changed brake pads or rotors before but I am going to do it myself once I get some new pads. It does look really easy and I am kicking myself for not doing this before. Do I need to do anything with the brake fluid before/after changing pads? Someone told me I need to remove some brake fluid before I start b/c resetting the piston can push fluid back into the main container and possibly overflow into your engine...And then of course add some more when you are finished. Is this true?
 

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You only have to worry about brake fluid overflow if you added some. Low brake fluid is supposed to be an indicator of how worn the components are, not a leak somewhere... if there was a leak, it'd be gone.

I'd recommend bleeding the brakes after you're all finished, just to purge the system of all the old fluid. Brake fluid absorbs something like 2% of its mass per year of moisture out of the air.
 

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I'd recommend bleeding the brakes after you're all finished, just to purge the system of all the old fluid. Brake fluid absorbs something like 2% of its mass per year of moisture out of the air.
:agree

It used to be stated to change the fluid every five years back in the day. I do mine more often because of road racing.
 
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