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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a little advice on a do-it-yourself driver quality paint job and I know alot of you here have the experience. I was going to wait a while to do the paint, but the car has so many patches and primer spots that I decided to just get it done. Here are the steps that I plan to follow. Please let me know if I am off base. The car has had one repaint which is cracking in spots and the whole thing is faded or cloudy.

I am only looking for driver quality so please help me keep it simple. I am thinking of House of Kolor Mandarin.

1. Sand the entire car down with a da getting up all of the loose or flaking paint, scuffing any old bondo while leaving most of the origional paint and primer as possible.
2. Prime bare metal spots with etching primer and lightly sand
3. Wash and wipe down with degreaser
3. Apply epoxy primer to entire cars rough surface
4. Use rage to smooth any ripples and use the da/block to sand smooth
5. Wash and wipe down
6. Apply a couple of coats of high build primer
7. Block it out using guide coat
8. Use rage to again fill any low spots
9. Spot prime where necessary after blocking
10. Wet sand entire car
11. Apply sealer over entire car?
12. Do I need to sand the sealer before paint?
13. Paint
14. Color sand
15. Clear coat
16. Buff

Thanks for the help.
 

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Sounds pretty good....on step 8 use body icing for the filler it sands much more like high build primer as the rage is a little tougher to cut with finer grits. no need to sand sealer if you did your wet sanding good and have no runs. Also, if you are using a basecoat/clearcoat system you do not color sand before clear, just spray color/spray clear so eliminate 14 also. but you will need to sand out the clear before you buff (to get out any clutter)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the clarification. That would have been a big mistake right at the end.

What can I do to avoid a cloudy finish?

Is a clear coat finish more idiot proof than a single stage?

I am also leaning toward a metallic paint.
 

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Metallic is bad and it may build up in areas, and gun pressure could tiger stripe it. Solid colors are easier to repair and blend. Single stage solids are easier than base clear. Metallic, you shoot it dryer with base clear, so not to tiger stripe. If this is your first paint job, do single stage to save money. Base/clear is always better and more durable and stay away from metallics.
 

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:agree with Jet, if it is just a "driver" finish and you are just trying to go over some old work thats popping up and not taking it down to bare metal all around, stick with a single stage. as chances are the old sins will pop back up in a few seasons. the BC/CC materials alone will run you around 1000.00.
 

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I'm no painter, but I agree with the single stage. I also agree with leaving as much of the factory primer on the car as possible. If it's not rusting thru after 45+ years, it's not going to now. I have single stage on both of mine ('65 was painted in 1985, and '67 was painted in 1993) and both still look nice. I like single stage because that's how these cars looked originally....shiny, but not like a glazed ham. I've also never seen a base/clear hold up as long. I had one base/clear car last 10 years before peeling and fading under the clear, and my '94 Toyota started to lose its clear a couple of years ago. I've never seen a base/clear job last 20+ years like my single stage cars....and I'm a guy who keeps his cars forever.
 

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If you are shooting urethane, it's next to impossible to get metallics to look right if you are shooting single stage. Go BC/CC
 

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I disagree. Both of mine are metallics, and both are urethane single stage. Both came out fine and still look good decades later....
 

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Decades? What year did you paint them?

It gets especially difficult if you have to color sand, if not, maybe you can get away with it
 

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The '65 was painted in 1985, so 2 1/2 decades there, and the '67 was painted in 1993, so not quite 2 decades. I apologize! I also color sanded the Flambeau Burgundy metallic on my '67, and polished it out. Took about 40 hours.( I didn't know at the time that I couldn't cut and polish metallic paint.) Still looks great, 19 years later. and in 1993, the PPG Urethane Enamel was only $200 a gallon!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It has been a while since I posted here, but I though I would share a few pics of the progress. I decided that I did not have the time or skills to try to paint this myself, so I found a good deal and pulled the trigger. It's a dark black cherry that looks black unless it is in direct sunlight. Maybe a little too dark, but the shine makes up for it.








 

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Those are some serious metal flakes! I love the color, and pretty much any dark blue, burgundy, or green that looks like black at night or out of the direct sun. That'll look fantastic when the chrome and trim goes back on!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Coming along! She has come a long way since it was dukes of hazard orange. It has been fun, but I'll never buy another project car again.



 
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