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Mine's heated, and cooled. Out here in the boonies west of Fort Worth, here's what our weather station is showing right now:

View attachment 154706

A couple hours ago it was showing 108.

Bear
I'm 100 miles south of you Bear and I'm feeling it all this week. Mine is cooled too, if I open the side door and the roll up door, and the wind is blowing just right. But then the donkeys and cows start getting curious and trying to wander inside. It's rough on the frontier...:ROFLMAO:
 

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I'm 100 miles south of you Bear and I'm feeling it all this week. Mine is cooled too, if I open the side door and the roll up door, and the wind is blowing just right. But then the donkeys and cows start getting curious and trying to wander inside. It's rough on the frontier...:ROFLMAO:
Oh yeah.... and right now our place needs mowing. My bride is hosting a family reunion here over the 4th weekend and for some reason she wants it to look nice. Go figure. Normally with my tractor and shredder I can get it all done in about 6 hours give or take, but here lately about an hour or so in the seat has been all I can take. Thank goodness we have a pool out here now that I can just go fall into after I've hit my limit.
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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Oh yeah.... and right now our place needs mowing. My bride is hosting a family reunion here over the 4th weekend and for some reason she wants it to look nice. Go figure. Normally with my tractor and shredder I can get it all done in about 6 hours give or take, but here lately about an hour or so in the seat has been all I can take. Thank goodness we have a pool out here now that I can just go fall into after I've hit my limit.
Jersey has a humid heat. And since all of my home and property money has been COMPLETELY BLOWN on car parts, I use a Tractor Supply stock tank with a kiddie pool filter and an electric hot water heater element, to cool down after a mow.

Works awesome, but similar to placing your life in Gods hands, you're now placing your balls in GFCI's hands.
 

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Oh yeah.... and right now our place needs mowing. My bride is hosting a family reunion here over the 4th weekend and for some reason she wants it to look nice. Go figure. Normally with my tractor and shredder I can get it all done in about 6 hours give or take, but here lately about an hour or so in the seat has been all I can take. Thank goodness we have a pool out here now that I can just go fall into after I've hit my limit.
You must have and open cab tractor like me. I have the shade canopy but it's too stinking hot in the afternoons to be out there very long. I see neighbors with nice air conditioned cabs with tinted windows and I try not to covet.

My wife makes the same requests and has finally given up on our broken down horse ranch looking like the nice one across the road. I remind her often that they have two full time ranch hands. I'm on my own and I do what I can when I'm not at work (or working on the GTO). ;)
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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I suspect you'll get many opinions on it. I have always run E10, no octane additives, and an AFR gauge, which I monitor religiously.

I keep my AFR's at mid to high 13's.

Even if there was data to support richening E10, there are so many variables between climate, drivers, and engines, that I'd be shocked to learn someone could tell a difference. I jet my carb at least 10 times a year, and I never feel any difference... I simply do it for engine health and mileage... trying to zero in on perfection. But whether Im at 12 or 14.5, and when changing between, I simply dont feel it.

The Edelbrock carb has idle mixtures, needle springs, needles, a pump shot, an air valve, primaries, and secondaries... all of which can be adjusted to control the specific areas of acceleration. And since I tinker with it constantly, Ive really gotten to A/B my changes.

I will let someone with "data" answer your question, but I would like to say this; even if there were an ideal mixture for my car, I highly doubt that it would be the same for yours.

I really never hear of or see anyone else on the forum, jetting thier car, so I often feel like a guinea pig... Im anxious to hear about your experiences if you start to tinker.
 

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I suspect you'll get many opinions on it. I have always run E10, no octane additives, and an AFR gauge, which I monitor religiously.

I keep my AFR's at mid to high 13's.

Even if there was data to support richening E10, there are so many variables between climate, drivers, and engines, that I'd be shocked to learn someone could tell a difference. I jet my carb at least 10 times a year, and I never feel any difference... I simply do it for engine health and mileage... trying to zero in on perfection. But whether Im at 12 or 14.5, and when changing between, I simply dont feel it.

The Edelbrock carb has idle mixtures, needle springs, needles, a pump shot, an air valve, primaries, and secondaries... all of which can be adjusted to control the specific areas of acceleration. And since I tinker with it constantly, Ive really gotten to A/B my changes.

I will let someone with "data" answer your question, but I would like to say this; even if there were an ideal mixture for my car, I highly doubt that it would be the same for yours.

I really never hear of or see anyone else on the forum, jetting thier car, so I often feel like a guinea pig... Im anxious to hear about your experiences if you start to tinker.
Thanks, that is helpful to know. I have been gradually leaning mine out, then started reading more on ethanol and needing to stay a little rich to compensate for the E10. I was still way too rich before but don't want to overcorrect, especially now that I'm at the point of having to order jets to get it more lean.
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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Well I can tell you that I have always ran on the lean side since the early 90s. For the last year and a half I had the car in the mid-14s.

After I put the new cam in at Thanksgiving I didn't notice a huge improvement in performance. So I started to richen it out, and there was still no improvement. It wasn't until I opened up the exhaust that the car took on an entirely new personality. At that point I richen it up merely as a precautionary measure but there was no improvement in performance by going into the 13s with my afrs
 

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Well I can tell you that I have always ran on the lean side since the early 90s. For the last year and a half I had the car in the mid-14s.

After I put the new cam in at Thanksgiving I didn't notice a huge improvement in performance. So I started to richen it out, and there was still no improvement. It wasn't until I opened up the exhaust that the car took on an entirely new personality. At that point I richen it up merely as a precautionary measure but there was no improvement in performance by going into the 13s with my afrs
"A wideband sensor lambda sensor based A/F meter calculates the A/F mixture by 鈥渞eading鈥 the unburned combustible content of the exhaust gases (note: a lot of people call the lambda sensor an oxygen sensor but Bosch calls it a lambda sensor). The wideband lambda sensor measures the amount of oxygen that must be added to or subtracted from the exhaust gas to form a stoichiometric gas mix in its reference chamber, the A/F meter then calculates the A/F mixture of the exhaust gas from that value.

The readings you get from a wideband lambda sensor based A/F meter can be quite accurate, but false readings can be created by an exhaust leak, engine misfire, or an engine with a high performance camshaft at lower engine speeds. These false readings are caused by the Lambda sensor misreading the unused oxygen and/or unburned combustibles that are in the exhaust gas mixture. A more realistic light-load, cruise A/F mixture for a stock carbureted engine running on reformulated unleaded gasoline is in the 14.1:1 range."

"If the engine you are tuning has an air-gap style intake manifold and/or high performance camshaft you may need to tune the idle and cruise mixtures richer than a stock engine with the same gasoline. The added performance from an air-gap intake manifold and the increased valve overlap from a high performance camshaft can often come at the price of lower fuel vaporization at lower rpm operating conditions.

The richer A/F mixture can help cover up the driveability problems when the fuel is not completely vaporized. The heat the intake manifold gets from the exhaust gas crossover in a conventional intake manifold helps the engine vaporize the fuel as it travels from the carburetor into the cylinders combustion chamber."

"Tuning with a 5-Gas Analyzer and Wideband Lambda Meter:

The use of a portable 5-gas exhaust gas analyzer and/or a wideband sensor based A/F meter can allow a tuner to observe the A/F mixture the engine is getting from its fuel system at any engine operating condition.

A starting point for A/F mixtures for most mild performance engines is:
鈥 Idle: 1.0% to 3.0 % CO or a 14.1-13.4:1;
鈥 Cruise rpm: 1.0% CO or a 14.1:1 with a mild performance engine; or 1.0% 鈥 3.0% CO or a 14.1 鈥 13.4:1 with high performance cam;
鈥 Power mixture and acceleration: 6.0% CO or a 12.5:1 for a 鈥渘ormal鈥 engine or high performance engine with improved combustion chamber design such as a Pro Stock or a NASCAR engine; in some cases you may be able to use a slightly leaner power mixture of 4% CO or a 13.0:1."
 

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Cameo Ivory 1967
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"A wideband sensor lambda sensor based A/F meter calculates the A/F mixture by 鈥渞eading鈥 the unburned combustible content of the exhaust gases (note: a lot of people call the lambda sensor an oxygen sensor but Bosch calls it a lambda sensor). The wideband lambda sensor measures the amount of oxygen that must be added to or subtracted from the exhaust gas to form a stoichiometric gas mix in its reference chamber, the A/F meter then calculates the A/F mixture of the exhaust gas from that value.

The readings you get from a wideband lambda sensor based A/F meter can be quite accurate, but false readings can be created by an exhaust leak, engine misfire, or an engine with a high performance camshaft at lower engine speeds. These false readings are caused by the Lambda sensor misreading the unused oxygen and/or unburned combustibles that are in the exhaust gas mixture. A more realistic light-load, cruise A/F mixture for a stock carbureted engine running on reformulated unleaded gasoline is in the 14.1:1 range."

"If the engine you are tuning has an air-gap style intake manifold and/or high performance camshaft you may need to tune the idle and cruise mixtures richer than a stock engine with the same gasoline. The added performance from an air-gap intake manifold and the increased valve overlap from a high performance camshaft can often come at the price of lower fuel vaporization at lower rpm operating conditions.

The richer A/F mixture can help cover up the driveability problems when the fuel is not completely vaporized. The heat the intake manifold gets from the exhaust gas crossover in a conventional intake manifold helps the engine vaporize the fuel as it travels from the carburetor into the cylinders combustion chamber."

"Tuning with a 5-Gas Analyzer and Wideband Lambda Meter:

The use of a portable 5-gas exhaust gas analyzer and/or a wideband sensor based A/F meter can allow a tuner to observe the A/F mixture the engine is getting from its fuel system at any engine operating condition.

A starting point for A/F mixtures for most mild performance engines is:
鈥 Idle: 1.0% to 3.0 % CO or a 14.1-13.4:1;
鈥 Cruise rpm: 1.0% CO or a 14.1:1 with a mild performance engine; or 1.0% 鈥 3.0% CO or a 14.1 鈥 13.4:1 with high performance cam;
鈥 Power mixture and acceleration: 6.0% CO or a 12.5:1 for a 鈥渘ormal鈥 engine or high performance engine with improved combustion chamber design such as a Pro Stock or a NASCAR engine; in some cases you may be able to use a slightly leaner power mixture of 4% CO or a 13.0:1."
No doubt. My dougs headers have notorious gasket leaks at the heads and I'm sure that's causing false readings on top of the cam. One thing is for sure, raising the rev limiter and opening the exhaust was a game changer for me. Our conversations about fine-tuning a lot of these issues made a huge improvement in my situation. And even though I can't say I noticed a massive improvement by richening my mixture, I do believe that it did make better driveability and is certainly more healthy for the engine
 

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No doubt. My dougs headers have notorious gasket leaks at the heads and I'm sure that's causing false readings on top of the cam. One thing is for sure, raising the rev limiter and opening the exhaust was a game changer for me. Our conversations about fine-tuning a lot of these issues made a huge improvement in my situation. And even though I can't say I noticed a massive improvement by richening my mixture, I do believe that it did make better driveability and is certainly more healthy for the engine
Ethanol in the gas means it needs a little richer mixture. If you read any "old school" magazine article or book where headers are added, the recommendation is to usually move up about 2 more steps in jetting. Most likely because the additional flow the headers provide will also suck out some of the intake charge during the overlap period of the cam. A richer mixture can also help to cool the intake charge and thus the cylinder. HOWEVER, make it too rich, then you of course would be washing down the cylinders of oil and wear would be somewhat accelerated - but how long that would take to show up when we drive our cars on such a limited number of miles each year, so maybe in 15 years you might see the results of accelerated wear? LOL

The 409 I had ran pig rich because I knew nothing like I do today. Standard plugs would foul, so in went the JC Whitney multi-ground strap "aircraft" plugs, Mallory dual point distributor, 0,000 Volt coil of the day, and an MSD6 box. Never fouled another plug even though it still ran the plugs dark. BIG solid cam, 11.0 compression, regular gas and never an issue with detonation and I figure now it was the BIG cam with all its overlap and the pig rich carbs that allowed me to run such high compression on regular gas of the day (1981-82). That rich mixture also allowed the engine to pull like a freight train as the RPM's climbed into the 6,500 RPM zone. A smaller single 4 Bbl that ran leaner probably would not have given the engine the performance it had - even with the BIG cam.

So like the cam, the carb can also be a trade-off in size (CFM) and how rich it is set-up. EFI or even a TBI set-up changes the whole game, but then it really isn't "old school" anymore - which I am not against, but just still cling to some of the old stuff because of nostalgia and it is what I grew up with. (y)
 

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Everybody is spot on here. I run E10 without any issues at all. I could run pure gas, but I drive the car a lot and got tired of hunting the pure stations even with the app.

Any modern fuel lines, ones that say 鈥渇or fuel injection鈥 for example will handle E10.

There are some keys and that is to tune the carb for E10 and don鈥檛 then run a tank of pure, or alternate tanks. E10 has a stoichiometric of 14.2鈥..pure has a stoich of 14.7. That is the AFR where all molecules of gasoline are completely combusted. You can achieve that efficiency with either one.

Pure has a bit more power per gallon, but E10 has a higher octane per gallon (resistance to knocking).

I use 2 products with E10 one is Redline Complete fuel system cleaner. 2 ounces in one fill-up.

Innthe next fill-up I use Stabil Marine 360 with vapor technology. The Stabil Marine 360 is there top product for Marine environments and it keeps E10 from phase separation. Keeps a vapor in thetank and throughout the system that prevents corrosion.

Redline is full of Poly Ether Amine (PEA) the carriers for the PEA are an octane booster and an upper cylinder lubricant. Both good things. PEA was invented by Chevron Chemists, it鈥檚 trade name is Techron. It will keep all your fuel system lines clean it will clean carbon deposits on valves and gum in intakes. It is the only chemical that can withstand the heat of combustion.

So use a your chose stuff, but E10 works great when all these things are done. Also the Wagner valve and catch can are A+ for a clean system.

Also drive the car and understand that all modern gas, pure or not was not made to sit, and gas comes in winter and summer blends everywhere. Keep it fresh, tune the carb for which one you use and stay with it. Use modern rubber, good additives to overcome it鈥檚 shortcomings and make sure your timing is perfect!

93 octane easily available is a good thing!
 
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