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Discussion Starter #1
For instance, in my '94 Z28, the gauge (gage) was a real gage, but in my '02 SS Camaro (which the GTO replaced as daily driver), the gage was not a real gage, only indicator, and for lack of correct term, I think a rheostat.

This was a heated topic that angered a lot of other enthusiast / purists like ourselves :party

Anyone know for sure ????
 

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The GTO uses the same engine coolant temp sensor as the 97-04 vette. In my little noggin, a gauge and an indicator are pretty much the same thing. I think it's as real as your gonna get, but the readings displayed are buffered or slowed down to not panic the driver with "normal" fluctuations. This may be what was pissin people off?
 

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westell said:
For instance, in my '94 Z28, the gauge (gage) was a real gage, but in my '02 SS Camaro (which the GTO replaced as daily driver), the gage was not a real gage, only indicator, and for lack of correct term, I think a rheostat.

This was a heated topic that angered a lot of other enthusiast / purists like ourselves :party

Anyone know for sure ????
You can get a digital display of the coolant temperature. I can't attest to its accuracy or how close it is to "real time," but --

(1) Insert key into ignition (don't start engine or turn key, yet);

(2) Press and hold down simultaneously both the "MODE" and "SET" buttons on the Trip Computer (those with two right arms will appreciate their abnormality (excuse me--"special gift") for the first time);

(3) While still holding the two buttons in (2) down, turn the key to the Accessory position -- you should see a display different from what you're accustomed to seeing;

(4) Using the "up" arrow, scroll until you see the temperature display.

You should be able to start the engine and continue to monitor the coolant temperature as you drive.

I haven't tried it for a while, but I believe the steps above are accurate. I'll try to check it out when I get home to be sure I haven't given given you a bum steer. Give it shot. When I last checked it, which was in August when outdoor temperatures here in Phoenix were about 105 deg., mine ran at about 190 deg.

:cheers
 

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I watched my guage a couple days ago wondering the same thing. From start up, the guage slowly climbed until it hit a constant temp. The question is, is the guage mechanical or digital and I would assume digital. A digital or electronic guage will only read to the precision of the device and sampling rate. For example, it might read in 20 degree or 50 degree changes or out to a thousand decimal places ever minute or every micro second. Most indicator type guages are accurate, but only display a couple different ranges.
 

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Capra2d is correct. If you want to watch the actual temperature, use the steps he has provided, and flip through the displays until you get to coolant temp.

I was very impressed at all of the different things you could monitor, I believe it showed the fuel pump flow? (I just quickly glanced at it). Very neat.
 

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capra2d said:
You can get a digital display of the coolant temperature. I can't attest to its accuracy or how close it is to "real time," but --

(1) Insert key into ignition (don't start engine or turn key, yet);

(2) Press and hold down simultaneously both the "MODE" and "SET" buttons on the Trip Computer (those with two right arms will appreciate their abnormality (excuse me--"special gift") for the first time);

(3) While still holding the two buttons in (2) down, turn the key to the Accessory position -- you should see a display different from what you're accustomed to seeing;

(4) Using the "up" arrow, scroll until you see the temperature display.

You should be able to start the engine and continue to monitor the coolant temperature as you drive.

I haven't tried it for a while, but I believe the steps above are accurate. I'll try to check it out when I get home to be sure I haven't given given you a bum steer. Give it shot. When I last checked it, which was in August when outdoor temperatures here in Phoenix were about 105 deg., mine ran at about 190 deg.

:cheers
Well, I didn't get it exactly right. Here's a correction --

At Step (4), scroll through the displays using the MODE button and you will find the coolant temperature reading.

I apologize for the bum steer.

Ken

:eek: :shutme
 

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Discussion Starter #7
capra2d said:
Well, I didn't get it exactly right. Here's a correction --

At Step (4), scroll through the displays using the MODE button and you will find the coolant temperature reading.

I apologize for the bum steer.

Ken

:eek: :shutme
noted and thanks. nice info to have :D :cheers
 

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FWIW, my '98 LS1 Vette had these stock settings:

Fan 1 On: 223F
Fan 1 Off: 219F

Fan 2 On: 235F
Fan 2 Off: 227F


Now I've modified the thermostat to open much earlier, but I have to cruise on the highway for a while before temps come down, and down they'll go, as low as 135F! My fans are currently programmed as such:

Fan 1 On: 190F
Fan 1 Off: 185F

Fan 2 On: 200F
Fan 2 Off: 190F

They don't work too hard right now, but come summer I'll have to up the fans since I doubt the Dewitt's radiator w/oil cooler I currently have, plus the ACP C5R vented hood will be enough to keep temps down without highway speeds or the fans working overtime.


Eugene
 

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Discussion Starter #9
that's one of the best things about programers.

put in the 160 degree stat and program the fans on earlier.

we all know that heat robs hp :(
 

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Westell, I understand your "heat robs hp" quote, but it's not entirely true. Oils run best at a specific temperature. I believe most modern synthetics have already been optimized to operate at 190F. I've seen drag motors with thermal ceramic coatings on the oil pan to help it heat up faster. Here is a quote from a story in the current edition of Racecar Engineering magazine:

"a racecar engine should never be required to give full power until it-and its lubricants-are at the correct operating temperature"

Another thing is that the oil absorbs a lot of liquid contaminants. If it doesn't get hot enough, it won't evaporate and it'll stay in the engine to cause damage.

The real reason I've reprogrammed my fans is because I autocross, so my temps definitely get up to temperature, but I want them to come down between runs, so I have the fans cool down the engine as much as it can before my next run. Frankly I'm worried about my temps not coming up enough this winter. My next mod will probably be fabbing up a way to block air from the radiator to help it heat up and stay heated.

My current stance is: 200F is good, I just don't want to sustain anything more.


Eugene
 
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