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This is my '65 GTO, purchased from the nephew of the original owner. It is numbers matching, original except for one repaint in 1976, and regular service items. I have owners manual, protect-to-plate, bill of sale etc., and PHS documentation. The original owner kept meticulous service records and receipts. No rust or damage, mint interior, and 89,000 original miles. I'm trying to figure out a value for insurance purposes, and wondered how it would fit in with Hagerty's 1-4 values. I realize a car is only worth what someone will pay, but would like to have a ballpark idea. Any input would be appreciated.
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I’m not an expert,insurance and selling are two different numbers, but from what I’ve seen and with the PHS intact, ps-pb ,the good maintenance, all numbers matching, and mint interior, good tires & no rust issues I’d say at least $52k-$55k or less depending if auto tranny and the rear end shape
 

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Is it auto or 4 speed? Maybe you can put up Hagerty's 1-4 values so we don't have to look them up. While it is somewhat original and 89,000 miles...it is not a survivor as it has had a paint. $45,000 is my guess. What's the prize?
 

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Looks like an auto tranny and that hurts the value A LOT. You can insure it for whatever you want (Hagerty naturally gets a bigger premium for the higher the value). Paperwork and provenance helps some, but won't overcome the 2 sp.automatic. My guess is 35-40k if you wanted to sell it.
 

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Rather than guess or get guesses, Have the car appraised.
This with other proper documents ( ie PHS) should be all that is needed to place either a Stated or Agreed value with Hagerty.
IMO a "Survivor will still only be valued on current market trends it only holds a higher value to a select few and sadly that group is dwindling.
Talk to Hagerty they are very much on top of the Classic Car market and have/offer several options for us.
Cheers
 

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Looks like an auto tranny and that hurts the value A LOT. You can insure it for whatever you want (Hagerty naturally gets a bigger premium for the higher the value). Paperwork and provenance helps some, but won't overcome the 2 sp.automatic. My guess is 35-40k if you wanted to sell it.
This is my '65 GTO, purchased from the nephew of the original owner. It is numbers matching, original except for one repaint in 1976, and regular service items. I have owners manual, protect-to-plate, bill of sale etc., and PHS documentation. The original owner kept meticulous service records and receipts. No rust or damage, mint interior, and 89,000 original miles. I'm trying to figure out a value for insurance purposes, and wondered how it would fit in with Hagerty's 1-4 values. I realize a car is only worth what someone will pay, but would like to have a ballpark idea. Any input would be appreciated. View attachment 138408 View attachment 138409 View attachment 138411 View attachment 138408 View attachment 138409 View attachment 138411
Beautiful car! Was power brakes an option in 65? If so, I never knew. But, there's lots I don't know. :)
 

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This is my '65 GTO, purchased from the nephew of the original owner. It is numbers matching, original except for one repaint in 1976, and regular service items. I have owners manual, protect-to-plate, bill of sale etc., and PHS documentation. The original owner kept meticulous service records and receipts. No rust or damage, mint interior, and 89,000 original miles. I'm trying to figure out a value for insurance purposes, and wondered how it would fit in with Hagerty's 1-4 values. I realize a car is only worth what someone will pay, but would like to have a ballpark idea. Any input would be appreciated. View attachment 138408 View attachment 138409 View attachment 138411 View attachment 138408 View attachment 138409 View attachment 138411
So how are you feeling about what your hearing? Not sure what you paid for it.
 

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So how are you feeling about what your hearing? Not sure what you paid for it.
I'm feeling pretty good about the car. I have to convert what you guys are saying into CDN $, and my thoughts are similar to yours.
 

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I used AAG to have mine appraised for insurance purposes several years ago. If I remember the cost was somewhere in the $350 range at the time. May be a little more now. They fine tooth comb the car and issue a report. If you go with them be prepared for a very thorough inspection including paint depth to look for hidden body work. If there's any filler, they will find it. Mine came in close to what I thought it would back then. They are a national company. You may be able to find a certified guy local to you for less but I was happy with the service they provided.

 

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Back in 2015 I had my 1967 GTO appraised by a nationally known appraiser and I was very disappointed with their rating system which runs from 0-No rating, 1-Poor, 2-Fair, 3-Good, 4-Very Good...to 5-Excellent...seems to me there should be a rating of perhaps "Outstanding" between "Very Good" -to- "Excellent"....as "Excellent" in my mind would be indicative of a concours rated car and "Very Good" would be a car below show quality. For example: My Rally II wheels were brand new...yet only rated a 4, The undercarriage was completely disassembled,stripped to bare metal, primed, repainted...yet only rated a 4, All the lights, including reverse & license plate are fully functional...yet only rated a 3...The interior, except for the new carpet, all original, virtually flawless...only rated a 3...The trunk, never a speck of rust, with original Goodyear Wide Oval Spare Tire & original Jack & Wrench...only rated a 3 (which was never looked at by the inspector)...The immaculate engine bay and freshly painted 455 engine which runs flawlessly with only 22K miles...only rated a 4...The disappointment was the inspector could not find one aspect to be categorized as "Excellent". To be fair, I know that considering my GTO is modified with the 455 motor and Tri-Power, it could never be considered "Concours"...However, the inspector could have thrown in a few "Excellent" ratings in a car that I've been told by many is one of the most pristine 1967's they've ever seen...yet to throw salt in the wound he rated my car a 2 (fair) for originality!...Although obviously prejudiced, I feel GTO's in condition such as mine are considerably undervalued by appraisers.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Is the 4 barrel original? You have a tri-power radiator and fan guard.
Yes, the 4bbl is original, as is the rest of the car. I'm new to Pontiacs, but I don't think that my fan guard & rad is specific to a tri-power.
 

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If you're setting the value for insurance purposes, then don't worry about trying to get a 100% accurate evaluation of worth. Hagerty allows you to specify what the value is and doesn't hassle you about whatever number you pick, at least they didn't with me. Shop around "various places" for ads that list 65's similar to yours for sale and pick a value that would be reasonable to you if, heaven forbid, you ever have to replace the car. Go with that.

Bear
 

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I have to get my values raised. I have had mine at $35,000 since completed 10/12 years ago. Since then I have rebuilt the motor, added Ram air manifolds and 3" exhaust, digital gauges, 4 wheel disk brakes and a bluetooth sound system. With todays prices you cant build what I have for less than $60,000. If someone else did it....who knows. So I am gonna raise mine substantially. OK I guess I will go find something else to do.Added enough of my 2 cents to a few posts lol.
 

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I like to look at car values from a numismatist prospective...for example: total Pontiac GTO production from 1964 -to- 1974 was 514,797...if a coin was produced in such low numbers it would be far more valuable than those produced in the millions. The lowest production model was the 1973 with only 4,806 made...the highest production year was the 1966 with 96,946...regardless, many small towns have a greater number in population. This coupled with the fact GM decided to make Pontiac & Oldsmobile obsolete should be enough in itself to increase values...Like a coin, it would also depend upon the condition of the vehicle. Of course my views are based upon my prejudiced opinion that the Pontiac GTO (especially the 1964 through 1972) are the most beautifully styled cars ever produced....However, as often stated: "Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder".
 

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I like to look at car values from a numismatist prospective...for example: total Pontiac GTO production from 1964 -to- 1974 was 514,797...if a coin was produced in such low numbers it would be far more valuable than those produced in the millions. The lowest production model was the 1973 with only 4,806 made...the highest production year was the 1966 with 96,946...regardless, many small towns have a greater number in population. This coupled with the fact GM decided to make Pontiac & Oldsmobile obsolete should be enough in itself to increase values...Like a coin, it would also depend upon the condition of the vehicle. Of course my views are based upon my prejudiced opinion that the Pontiac GTO (especially the 1964 through 1972) are the most beautifully styled cars ever produced....However, as often stated: "Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder".
Prices are simply generated by supply and demand and the next highest price at which the car is sold - its that simple. If all of a sudden you saw base model GTO's being purchased at 70K, then that would set the price for base GTO's and all above that with specific options and "rarity" would then increase accordingly to what anyone is willing to therefore pay - much of it is fueled by ego and greed. Once the price hits "X" and the bodies are no longer obtainable (like a Willys coipe or '32 Duece), the fiberglass industry will kick in and you will be able to purchase a quality fiberglass body/parts and assemble one the way you choose - just like the hot rodding market. Then, like some muscle cars and hot rods that are really "timeless," they will begin to offer these in steel as they are now and the metal smith's and customizers will be able to do their thing.

When this happens, only the "rare" GTO's will hold their value and possibly go up, but the average GTO price will drop as the availability of a fiberglass or steel knock-off will allow anyone to start with a blank slate and create in any way or form, the car they want and not have to pay a top price for a car that has already been modified when they are only going to modify it anyway, and sink more money into it, or a junky rusted hulk that will put them upside down in rebuilding and still be left with a non-original cobbled together car.
 

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Makes a lot of sense Jim...and you are absolutely correct with many of the muscle cars of the 1960's...take AMES & OPG for example, if you had the money you could practically build an entire GTO from their parts catalogs...this is obvious with the variety of clone GTO's you see for sale nowadays....whereas, with the lesser produced 1980's GM "G Body" muscle cars like my 1987 Olds 442, you are hard pressed to find good quality parts thus the values are slowly rising as the average (non-rare) 1960's/70's appear to be falling...Regardless, when you paid $2,800.00 for a GTO in 1967 that's now worth as much as a brand new Hell Cat...it's well worth holding on to.
 

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I still submit that when the topic is insurance, what your car might be worth on the open market is of zero consequence. All that matters is what it's worth to you, and what it would cost you to either replace it in the event of a total loss, or restore/repair it otherwise.

That's why companies like Hagerty allow you to set the value yourself instead of forcing you to accept their valuation, as would be the case with "normal" car insurance.

Bear
 
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