Pontiac GTO Forum banner
1 - 20 of 58 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am hoping to spend some jack in the next month so that when spring/summer hits, I can get after re-doing the rolling chassis and need your help. It's a fair amount for me to wrap my head around and some decisions have to be made...the time has come.

I'm just going to throw out my thoughts and see what sticks...

1.) I need a front disc brake conversion kit and am leaning towards the smaller diameter booster for better clearance at the valve covers. I intend on using 15" steelies and am not concerned with originality. I just want better than stock drum braking that discs offer. Ames says you can get the 9" booster upon request. Here's what I'm looking at from Ames...

Rectangle Font Circle Terrestrial plant Number



Open for discussion...pros/cons with this kit?

2.) Next is the rear end and this one is making my head spin quite a bit. I currently have the stock 10 bolt with the 2.56 gears and want to go with something in the 3's. At first glance, the favorite ratios seem to be in the 3.23 to 3.36 range…BUT I am leaning heavily towards a Gear Vendors overdrive behind my 400TH. Now I’m thinking more like 3.55, but am open to advice. I will have maximized the space in the rear wheel wells for the widest treaded radial drags (without cutting the frame and tubbing). My motor build is not set in stone yet, but will land between 400 and 500 HP. I need to prepare for the higher end since “more power” is hard to resist. That leads me to want the 12 bolt or Ford 9”. One thing I could do is buy a Ford 9” without the gear set. This should allow me to rebuild the rolling chassis and make the gear ratio decision later, Right?

I want to buy a rear end that accommodates stock/aftermarket replacement suspension parts and bolts in without having to modify anything. I intend to upgrade to tubular suspension and add a rear sway bar that u-bolts to the axle, not the trailing arms (along with frame braces). I’ll take all recommendations for a company that offers this type of rear end service.

Another thing on my mind is ordering a custom width rear end to help guarantee that the widest wheel/tire combo can be installed. Do I need to buy my wheels and tires in order to figure that out?

I’ll think about drum or disc rear brakes later to keep my head form cracking open. I'm pretty sure I have the suspension parts figured out. Except what rear sway bar to get, but that depends on what rear end I go with, I suppose.
 

· 64-67 Expert
Joined
·
9,664 Posts
I'll play: Have you thought of simply installing '68-'72 A body spindles and front brakes? Did a '65 GTO for a total of $90 years ago, which included all the parts. This was from a sa;avge yarde. Straight bolt on, no brackets to fail or come loose. Won't change front end geometry at all. Franks Pontiac Parts in CA may have the stuff.
If you are going to bother to upgrade the rear, a Ford 9" is head and shoulders superior to a 12 bolt. NO comparison. And MUCH easier to change gear ratios, since it's a 'drop out' unit. With a GV overdrive, I would run a 3.50 or even better, a 3.89 rear gear, knowing your plans. I would NOT bother with rear disc brakes. They usually have inferior parking/emergency brake capacity compared to the drums, and only do 25% of the stopping. I would only do rear disc brakes if I was going to track the car on a road race course in events that went many laps. Otherwise, total waste of money, and IMO, inferior to stock drum, which don't need failure-prone brackets and spacers and crap to work.
As for wheels and tires, that is the hardest part, and easy to mess up on. You will need to get your rear end installed and measured and go from there. If I were getting a custom 9" rear, I would likely get one that ran about 2 or 3 inches narrower than the stock 8.2 ten bolt that comes on these cars. I had a set of 11" slicks on my '65 years ago mounted on Chevy rally rims and they fit perfectly. Barely, but they cleared. No air shocks, etc.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
I am hoping to spend some jack in the next month so that when spring/summer hits, I can get after re-doing the rolling chassis and need your help. It's a fair amount for me to wrap my head around and some decisions have to be made...the time has come.

I'm just going to throw out my thoughts and see what sticks...

1.) I need a front disc brake conversion kit and am leaning towards the smaller diameter booster for better clearance at the valve covers. I intend on using 15" steelies and am not concerned with originality. I just want better than stock drum braking that discs offer. Ames says you can get the 9" booster upon request. Here's what I'm looking at from Ames...

View attachment 159645


Open for discussion...pros/cons with this kit?

2.) Next is the rear end and this one is making my head spin quite a bit. I currently have the stock 10 bolt with the 2.56 gears and want to go with something in the 3's. At first glance, the favorite ratios seem to be in the 3.23 to 3.36 range…BUT I am leaning heavily towards a Gear Vendors overdrive behind my 400TH. Now I’m thinking more like 3.55, but am open to advice. I will have maximized the space in the rear wheel wells for the widest treaded radial drags (without cutting the frame and tubbing). My motor build is not set in stone yet, but will land between 400 and 500 HP. I need to prepare for the higher end since “more power” is hard to resist. That leads me to want the 12 bolt or Ford 9”. One thing I could do is buy a Ford 9” without the gear set. This should allow me to rebuild the rolling chassis and make the gear ratio decision later, Right?

I want to buy a rear end that accommodates stock/aftermarket replacement suspension parts and bolts in without having to modify anything. I intend to upgrade to tubular suspension and add a rear sway bar that u-bolts to the axle, not the trailing arms (along with frame braces). I’ll take all recommendations for a company that offers this type of rear end service.

Another thing on my mind is ordering a custom width rear end to help guarantee that the widest wheel/tire combo can be installed. Do I need to buy my wheels and tires in order to figure that out?

I’ll think about drum or disc rear brakes later to keep my head form cracking open. I'm pretty sure I have the suspension parts figured out. Except what rear sway bar to get, but that depends on what rear end I go with, I suppose.
I did an 8" dual booster and can get the cover off easily and have real good brakes, almost 15 inches of vacuum with my cam and 1.6 rockers because of the 114 LSC and I have disc/drum, rear discs aren't necessary unless you want the cool Pro Tour look which if I had to do it over would have gone that way but it's more money. If you're thinking about it do it now because that's why I'm not changing to rear discs I would have to change the P valve, buy new E brake cables and spend a lot more money on the brakes....but you never know with me ;) I'll have a 12 bolt housing w/Strange axels and maybe brakes available in the narrower '65 width if interested but you might be to far away from Northern IL. You could look at the one I'm getting the Strange Dana S60, it has raised upper arm mounts to help eliminate wheel hop and multi position lower mounts...2600.00 at Summit plus tax and some add ones so about 3K delivered and bullet proof. And don't forget about the drive shaft with 1350's on both ends and the diff yoke.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll play: Have you thought of simply installing '68-'72 A body spindles and front brakes? Did a '65 GTO for a total of $90 years ago, which included all the parts. This was from a sa;avge yarde. Straight bolt on, no brackets to fail or come loose. Won't change front end geometry at all. Franks Pontiac Parts in CA may have the stuff.
If you are going to bother to upgrade the rear, a Ford 9" is head and shoulders superior to a 12 bolt. NO comparison. And MUCH easier to change gear ratios, since it's a 'drop out' unit. With a GV overdrive, I would run a 3.50 or even better, a 3.89 rear gear, knowing your plans. I would NOT bother with rear disc brakes. They usually have inferior parking/emergency brake capacity compared to the drums, and only do 25% of the stopping. I would only do rear disc brakes if I was going to track the car on a road race course in events that went many laps. Otherwise, total waste of money, and IMO, inferior to stock drum, which don't need failure-prone brackets and spacers and crap to work.
As for wheels and tires, that is the hardest part, and easy to mess up on. You will need to get your rear end installed and measured and go from there. If I were getting a custom 9" rear, I would likely get one that ran about 2 or 3 inches narrower than the stock 8.2 ten bolt that comes on these cars. I had a set of 11" slicks on my '65 years ago mounted on Chevy rally rims and they fit perfectly. Barely, but they cleared. No air shocks, etc.
I am hoping for a disc kit. Can the '68-'72 parts be found in a kit of new parts.

As far as the rear end and wheels and tires go...I'm thinking to stick with standard available back spacings and adjust the rear end width to them. I'm still noodling how to determine the rear width with my car off the frame and on a cart/dolly.

Thanks for "playing", the game's not over!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did an 8" dual booster and can get the cover off easily and have real good brakes, almost 15 inches of vacuum with my cam and 1.6 rockers because of the 114 LSC and I have disc/drum, rear discs aren't necessary unless you want the cool Pro Tour look which if I had to do it over would have gone that way but it's more money. If you're thinking about it do it now because that's why I'm not changing to rear discs I would have to change the P valve, buy new E brake cables and spend a lot more money on the brakes....but you never know with me ;) I'll have a 12 bolt housing w/Strange axels and maybe brakes available in the narrower '65 width if interested but you might be to far away from Northern IL. You could look at the one I'm getting the Strange Dana S60, it has raised upper arm mounts to help eliminate wheel hop and multi position lower mounts...2600.00 at Summit plus tax and some add ones so about 3K delivered and bullet proof. And don't forget about the drive shaft with 1350's on both ends and the diff yoke.
I will have to do some reading on the Dana S60, your price point seems quite a bit lower than the first, and only, price check I've made on the Ford 9".

What do you mean about the yoke sizes (1350's). I realize that they may have to change styles from original, but I am curious to what you are referring to. At this point, I don't even know what was original to my car.

I'll be happy with drums in the back. My preference in wheels will not show the bling in the background. (y)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
I will have to do some reading on the Dana S60, your price point seems quite a bit lower than the first, and only, price check I've made on the Ford 9".

What do you mean about the yoke sizes (1350's). I realize that they may have to change styles from original, but I am curious to what you are referring to. At this point, I don't even know what was original to my car.

I'll be happy with drums in the back. My preference in wheels will not show the bling in the background. (y)
Just make sure the pinion yoke on the 12bolt (if you go that way) is a 1350 with that HP and big tires, the guy that built mine used a 1330 or whatever the next size down is so I changed it out. I also have a 1350 trans yoke. The Dana comes standard with a 1350, also some review the S60 better than a 9-inch, it's 9.750 and takes less power to drive it but the gear changes are easier on the 9 of course but I don’t plan on doing any changing that's why I'm trying to get my gear right for now and in the future.
 

· Registered
1967 GTO
Joined
·
269 Posts
If you go with the Ford 9" rear end, don't forget to make sure your brakes fit with that rear end. Your GTO brakes won't work (or at least might require some different brackets). Ask me how I know.

I went with all UMI suspension parts, but I can't attest to how well they work just yet. The fit and finish was nice enough, though. A lot of people seem to like Global West too.

As for the axle-mounted sway bar, I've got my eye on either the Spohn or Umi, but that's later down the line for me.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,374 Posts
I will have to do some reading on the Dana S60, your price point seems quite a bit lower than the first, and only, price check I've made on the Ford 9".

What do you mean about the yoke sizes (1350's). I realize that they may have to change styles from original, but I am curious to what you are referring to. At this point, I don't even know what was original to my car.

I'll be happy with drums in the back. My preference in wheels will not show the bling in the background. (y)
"1350" is the size associated with the larger U-joints/caps. Pontiac used a large 1330 U-jount while Chevy used a smaller size still, I think 1310.

I have the 9" and got the "large wheel bearings" and the 11" rear drum kit to go along with it. Disc brakes are not really needed with the 11" drums (believe Pontiac was 9"). Get a good "soft" brake lining that will grip well versus a harder "lifetime" lining that won't stop so good.

You will be hard pressed to find a factory '68-72 single piston disc set-up and than all you are doing is installing 50 year old parts which will require rebuilding or replacing of the calipers and at best, turning down the rotors and installing all new bearing/seals - and they won't be cheap. Better to go with an aftermarket disc brake set-up with all new parts.

Some will require different A-arms based on the type of spindles used with the aftermarket kit.

With disc brakes, it is important to have correct fitting rims that will allow the disc calipers to fit inside and be deep enough so as not to hit the calipers/rotors. Some kits are indeed better than others.

Also want correct proportioning valve to match disc/drums or disc/discs and possibly a metering valve if disc/drums. MC will also need to be spec's as the MC piston bore size is important to brake pedal effort and fluid volume movement. Don't just assume because the advertiser "says" it will fit your car - DO THE RESEARCH.

(y)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
I ordered out the rear 11" Ford drums for my Dana 60 in the GTO and they have been perfect. My son's '68 Firebird had the 9" diff and 11" drums and worked great. Then talked two of my friends into the 11" rear drums and they also really like the feel and stopping power. On the other hand, I've had friends in the GTO club that went with rear disc brakes and they have had trouble setting up the rear discs with enough stopping power and couldn't get them adjusted to have the rears do their share.

I've had quite a few vehicles with the single piston front discs and I really prefer the two piston or especially the four piston calipers. Just seems to have better feel and a more aggressive stopping ability. Now the single piston far outshines and out stops the drum brakes, but there is a noticeable improvement when more money is spent. I converted a '67 GTO to single piston setup off a '69 Grand Prix. Got the setup out of pick-a-part and by the time I rebuilt everything I wasn't any money ahead of just going with one of the full kits now available. My blue GTO was ordered with the 4-piston discs and they are massively better than the single piston units that were available in later years. Just a pain finding parts for the early calipers when it does come time to refresh things.

My latest endeavor is the '65 Catalina Safari wagon. That car was truly frightening when I first brought it home and every stop was a life threatening experience. Went with the 13" disc Master Power Brakes and 17" wheels and they really bring the big barge down without a problem. Overkill for a lighter GTO, but bigger proved better for the wagon.

Tire Wheel Motor vehicle Car Automotive tire


Friend and I made a dual order to save some shipping costs. Here is
the pair of Dana 60's with the 11" drums. We finally decided on the 3.73
ratio because of the 28" tall tires and the 5th gear ratio of the Tremec.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
That's the combo I'm dreaming about, how do you like it on the street? I was going to try and reuse my rear drums as they're only a few years old, Strange said I have to open up the hole on the backing plate for the bigger bolt in axle bearing. Maybe I should check into the cost of the bigger drum brakes.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
The idea I was toying with was to pull my axles then suspended the backing plates without disconnecting the lines, make the holes bigger then pull the axles on the Dana and bolt my plates on. Idk if it's going to work and if the lines will work, my brakes are good and I was hoping to not have to bleed the brakes as I've finally got my master cover to stop leaking but if I have to I do.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
As far as the price point mentioned above, the 12-bolt was the most expensive, then the 9", and the least expensive was the Dana 60 when we purchased ours. No idea why the 12-bolt was so expensive but it was another $600 over the others when ordered with all the upgrades.

Our original 9" drums are substandard by every measure and you just as well upgrade. The Ford big bearings are the only way to go with whatever rear you choose. I was thinking that the bolt pattern for the Ford backing plate was really different than the 10/12 bolt pattern but never physically checked. Hopefully the 9" drum will fit correctly in both the diameter of the center hole and the axle shaft is properly located to center the drums on the shoes. I was able to use both the emergency brake cables and brake lines with the new rear with the Ford brakes.

We were vacillating between the 3.54 and the 3.73 and I might have went with the 3.54 if I had a milder cam. Makes about a 5 MPH difference in optimum cruising speed with the 3.73's coming in about 78 MPH and 83 MPH for the 3.54's. The main problem is my fairly large cam wouldn't be happy when having to cruise at 65 with the higher ratio. There's always going to be a dead spot with a manual trans where 4th is spinning somewhat and 5th is somewhat low in the RPM range. With the 3.73's the indecision spot between 4th and 5th is between 55 to 60 while the 3.54's would have been 60-65, and there will be many times on the freeway I'd be stuck at or just below 65 in Saturday afternoon traffic. Not that big of deal either way with either gear, but I also prefer the slightly lower first gear final ratio for chugging along when traffic finally drops down to a crawl.

Ford 11" internals. You can see my not-so-pretty emergency brake cables attached.
Automotive lighting Automotive tire Helmet Motor vehicle Vehicle brake


The extended mounts as mentioned above. This is the standard cover and
is still formidable. The available aluminum covers take things to the next level.
I did spring for the powder coating.
Bicycle part Personal protective equipment Handgun holster Machine Auto part



Besides the ring gear being larger in diameter, the tooth width is over a
half inch wider than the 12-bolt or Ford 9". Photo looses some perspective
of the size - that's 3" exhaust in the background.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Automotive fuel system Auto part



Last photo just to show we can practice re*neck techniques in SoCal.
The friend on truck is the one that ordered out the other Dana.
Wheel Land vehicle Tire Vehicle Automotive tire
 

· Registered
1967 GTO
Joined
·
269 Posts
As far as the price point mentioned above, the 12-bolt was the most expensive, then the 9", and the least expensive was the Dana 60 when we purchased ours. No idea why the 12-bolt was so expensive but it was another $600 over the others when ordered with all the upgrades.

Our original 9" drums are substandard by every measure and you just as well upgrade. The Ford big bearings are the only way to go with whatever rear you choose. I was thinking that the bolt pattern for the Ford backing plate was really different than the 10/12 bolt pattern but never physically checked. Hopefully the 9" drum will fit correctly in both the diameter of the center hole and the axle shaft is properly located to center the drums on the shoes. I was able to use both the emergency brake cables and brake lines with the new rear with the Ford brakes.

We were vacillating between the 3.54 and the 3.73 and I might have went with the 3.54 if I had a milder cam. Makes about a 5 MPH difference in optimum cruising speed with the 3.73's coming in about 78 MPH and 83 MPH for the 3.54's. The main problem is my fairly large cam wouldn't be happy when having to cruise at 65 with the higher ratio. There's always going to be a dead spot with a manual trans where 4th is spinning somewhat and 5th is somewhat low in the RPM range. With the 3.73's the indecision spot between 4th and 5th is between 55 to 60 while the 3.54's would have been 60-65, and there will be many times on the freeway I'd be stuck at or just below 65 in Saturday afternoon traffic. Not that big of deal either way with either gear, but I also prefer the slightly lower first gear final ratio for chugging along when traffic finally drops down to a crawl.

Ford 11" internals. You can see my not-so-pretty emergency brake cables attached.
View attachment 159699

The extended mounts as mentioned above. This is the standard cover and
is still formidable. The available aluminum covers take things to the next level.
I did spring for the powder coating.
View attachment 159700


Besides the ring gear being larger in diameter, the tooth width is over a
half inch wider than the 12-bolt or Ford 9". Photo looses some perspective
of the size - that's 3" exhaust in the background.
View attachment 159701


Last photo just to show we can practice *** techniques in SoCal.
The friend on truck is the one that ordered out the other Dana.
View attachment 159707
Wilwood has a great resource for the different bolt patterns here. It's what helped me figure out what I needed to order.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
As far as the price point mentioned above, the 12-bolt was the most expensive, then the 9", and the least expensive was the Dana 60 when we purchased ours. No idea why the 12-bolt was so expensive but it was another $600 over the others when ordered with all the upgrades.

Our original 9" drums are substandard by every measure and you just as well upgrade. The Ford big bearings are the only way to go with whatever rear you choose. I was thinking that the bolt pattern for the Ford backing plate was really different than the 10/12 bolt pattern but never physically checked. Hopefully the 9" drum will fit correctly in both the diameter of the center hole and the axle shaft is properly located to center the drums on the shoes. I was able to use both the emergency brake cables and brake lines with the new rear with the Ford brakes.

We were vacillating between the 3.54 and the 3.73 and I might have went with the 3.54 if I had a milder cam. Makes about a 5 MPH difference in optimum cruising speed with the 3.73's coming in about 78 MPH and 83 MPH for the 3.54's. The main problem is my fairly large cam wouldn't be happy when having to cruise at 65 with the higher ratio. There's always going to be a dead spot with a manual trans where 4th is spinning somewhat and 5th is somewhat low in the RPM range. With the 3.73's the indecision spot between 4th and 5th is between 55 to 60 while the 3.54's would have been 60-65, and there will be many times on the freeway I'd be stuck at or just below 65 in Saturday afternoon traffic. Not that big of deal either way with either gear, but I also prefer the slightly lower first gear final ratio for chugging along when traffic finally drops down to a crawl.

Ford 11" internals. You can see my not-so-pretty emergency brake cables attached.
View attachment 159699

The extended mounts as mentioned above. This is the standard cover and
is still formidable. The available aluminum covers take things to the next level.
I did spring for the powder coating.
View attachment 159700


Besides the ring gear being larger in diameter, the tooth width is over a
half inch wider than the 12-bolt or Ford 9". Photo looses some perspective
of the size - that's 3" exhaust in the background.
View attachment 159701


Last photo just to show we can practice re*neck techniques in SoCal.
The friend on truck is the one that ordered out the other Dana.
View attachment 159707
Good to know and you're the reason I looked into the Dana, like I said if I do the 3.73 I know it's going to be a little rough with my 4spd but I'm talking myself into the TKX maybe in 2024. I have enough to pay off and now a new rear plus our sons wedding in September that we are making a healthy contribution to....could have had a lot of nice car upgrades for that :rolleyes: So I only see two sets of rear drums on the Strange site that say they are Fords, is that what you used because I was going to call them tomorrow, they're also 645.00 so I might stick with mine if possible. I have to get the Detroit Track Lok diff with the helico gears so no clutches as it's the only one available they said, also going with the 1/2" studs and Strange aluminum diff cover, not the pricey one and I think for 83.00 the billet u joint girdle even though they said it's not necessary. This diff also has the adjuster nuts on the caps for adjusting backlash and preload. Summit has it for a 100.00 less than Strange right now and I can pick it up...30 minute from my office (y)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
I ordered my Dana three years ago almost to the day. Looked up my invoice and it said "Late B.F. Drum Brake Kit". Also went with the Chromoly 1350 Yoke and the Dana Truetrac with the helical gears. Absolutely love the Truetrac - 100% traction to both wheels as soon as the gas is hit but operates like an open diff when driving normal.

The friend in my last photo has been bitten by the drag racing bug and is in pursuit of better strip times. A couple weeks ago we installed 4.10's in his Dana in place of the 3.73's. It was the first time I played with the threaded preloads and there was somewhat of a learning curve. Was used to the feel of loading shims for preload and was a little worrisome to just crank in preload without having a true reference point. Last time out he was dumping the clutch and bringing the front wheels off the ground about 4" and so far things are all holding up.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
I ordered my Dana three years ago almost to the day. Looked up my invoice and it said "Late B.F. Drum Brake Kit". Also went with the Chromoly 1350 Yoke and the Dana Truetrac with the helical gears. Absolutely love the Truetrac - 100% traction to both wheels as soon as the gas is hit but operates like an open diff when driving normal.

The friend in my last photo has been bitten by the drag racing bug and is in pursuit of better strip times. A couple weeks ago we installed 4.10's in his Dana in place of the 3.73's. It was the first time I played with the threaded preloads and there was somewhat of a learning curve. Was used to the feel of loading shims for preload and was a little worrisome to just crank in preload without having a true reference point. Last time out he was dumping the clutch and bringing the front wheels off the ground about 4" and so far things are all holding up.
Nice, well I guess that's all they offer in drum brakes but they're still expensive. Now it looks like they call the diff with helical gears an S track and I'm also getting the chrome moly yoke
probably with the heavy duty caps.
Gesture Font Auto part Audio equipment Event
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've learned some things from this thread already and have "built" a 9" rear end off the Currie site and have some questions. Not that I am set on Currie...I just started there to get a feel for what's involved. Here's the fictitious build...

Font Rectangle Parallel Number Screenshot


Questions...ignore the ratio for the time being, but I suspect it will be between 3.25 and 3.89.

1.) Axle spline options are 31 & 35....what's a guy need to know to make the right choice? It makes over $700 difference in the final price plus the case option dollars that follow.

2.) If you choose 35 spline, you have to pick from an nodular iron "race" or aluminum "Pro" case. Picking the 31 spline, the options are the "sportsman" iron or light weight aluminum case. I'd bet this has to do with horsepower and/or weight loss, in general...where do I stand?

3.) What diff style to strongly consider? I here folks bragging about the Detroit and Eaton often enough...pros/cons? Why would anybody build a 9" with and open diff? Here is Currie's options...

Rectangle Font Screenshot Parallel Technology


4.) The 1350 Yoke comes in Nodular Iron or Chromoly. How to make the $5 difference decision?

Rectangle Font Parallel Circle Pattern


5.) These are the drum brakes that come with the kit...looks like they are for the large bearing rear ends. The description is fairly nondescript, anything to question here?...

Product Automotive tire Font Circle Screenshot



6.) Wheel stud size options. I'd love to keep the OEM 7/16" size, but should I bump up to the 1/2"? Do the wheels that work on the 7/16" also work on the 1/2"? I guess that's my main concern.
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Top