Pontiac GTO Forum banner
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...on my new 2006 impulse blue M6.

In short... learning how to drive a manual when i've been driving nothing but automatics for ~5 years.... is harder than I thought it would be.

I took ~20 minutes tooling around a parking lot just trying to get a feel for it, and i'm still by no means comfortable with it.

Did anybody else on here learn to drive stick with their GTO? How did it go for you?

Other than that.... love the car. I can't wait until I'm comfortable enough with it to really drive it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Congrats on the car. You'll love her.

I too learned how to drive stick in my Goat. I had driven stick before, but never owned one. I probably had a total of 3 hours in my lifetime driving a stick before I got the Goat.

Maybe for the first 2 months I was really frustrated because I was not able to shift through the gears as smoothly as I should be.:willy: I practiced and practiced and it just wouldn't get better. I avoided any steep hills unless I can clear them with the pedal to the floor, and I dreaded driving in traffic because of the stop and go.

But I eventually got it down, and now am very comfortable. Now all I got to learn is hot to burn out in a stand still. Anyone else care to chime in and tell me the secret??:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
I learned on my dads 95 S10 but that was like driving an Automatic,
got better with my brothers 04 STi
basically learn your clutch, learn where the "sweet spot" is and try to remember it.
Shifting will take a little time, because of the gawdy monstrosity they call a shifter, it'll take a while to get used to
After practicing about 2 weeks to a month you'll get it down bro.
Congrats on the GOAT:cheers
You Got the best colorcombo ever!!!
Welcome to the family:party:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Good deal on the GTO. The best way to learn a stick is on an incline. Find a hill where traffic won't bother you and practice there. It won't take long until you get it. Stall it a few times on purpose and slip the clutch a few times and you will know where you be in most any situation. It's better to get some time on a hill before you have to do it in real traffic. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,083 Posts
Trukcrazy said:
Good deal on the GTO. The best way to learn a stick is on an incline. Find a hill where traffic won't bother you and practice there. It won't take long until you get it. Stall it a few times on purpose and slip the clutch a few times and you will know where you be in most any situation. It's better to get some time on a hill before you have to do it in real traffic. Good luck.
I think you need to get a general feel for the interaction betwen clutch and gas in a BIG parking lot first, before you get on a hill. If you start trying to do this on a hill, you're going to get frustrated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
STi v. GTO and other ramblings

Hey 707 how would you compare the GTO to the STi? I'm getting ready to pull the trigger on either a Legacy GT or a GTO. I see you have experience with both so just looking for some feedback.

-mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Good for you, Hegulator! Brave of you to commit to a manual, too.

The GTO, with its big motor and mountain of torque, is a very forgiving car with which to learn a stick--nothing at all like trying to learn on a fussy little car with a teeny, rev-happy, easy-to-stall motor. As you may have noticed, you actually can ease up on the clutch--your right foot completely OFF the accelerator--and your GTO will still start to creep forward. It's so easy to get rolling that it'll spoil you if you try anything else.

Practice smoothness for a while. Don't worry about speed; that'll come. Learn where the sweet spot is in the clutch and practice smooth gear-to-gear exchanges under light throttle. Your feet will learn the feel of the pedals (when to get off the clutch and get on the gas), and that'll eventually become a muscle memory you'll never even have to think about--you'll just do it.

For now, swallow your pride and let all those Honda Civics pass you. You're too cool for them anyway. Later, when your feet know their way around, your time will come. Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the encouragement! The first night I took it out, it was pretty frustrating (big, empty parking lot... my dad trying to teach me), but then I was brave enough to take it to work the next morning (~10 min drive, light traffic) and it went pretty well. I'm getting fairly smooth with my starts now, and my upshifts have been going well, but slowing down and downshifting is giving me a hard time still. Like, for example, i'm in 3rd and slowing down... I like to drop it in 2nd when i get down around 1200-1000 rpm. When I do that, it still jerks on me. I'm thinking I maybe have to let the clutch out slower on downshifts? Blip the throttle? I'm not quite sure how that works yet. Otherwise, i'm starting to like going up through the gears. I gave it a little bit of gas on a nice, open stretch of road going to work this morning... and before I knew it I was at like 65. It's crazy how much power this thing has, especially coming from driving an old 1993 thunderbird.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
btchplz said:
Now all I got to learn is hot to burn out in a stand still. Anyone else care to chime in and tell me the secret??:D
Before you take off just let off the clutch by at least 1/4th of the way and step gently on the gas until you feel it catch then your set to go (Equally relieve the pressure on clutch as you increase the force on the gas pedal. I don't use the gas until the clutch is up all the way, usually I ease off the clutch in 1st gear until the car starts rolling then I just press the gas (NO MORE BURNING THE CLUTCH FOR ME:D !) I learned it the hard way in my 1998 Cobra, it was my first car/standard tranny and I went through my brand new clutch in less than 45 minutes.

Sorry for my mundane approach but that's the best I could put it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
noz34me said:
I think you need to get a general feel for the interaction betwen clutch and gas in a BIG parking lot first, before you get on a hill. If you start trying to do this on a hill, you're going to get frustrated.
I stand by my advice. The weight of the car on the incline helps you get the general feel better and you will get it alot faster. It actually saves you the frustration, because when you can pull off on an incline without stalling or slipping the clutch, everything else is easy. This is how I taught my wife how to drive a stick and she had it mastered inside 30 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Hegulator said:
Slowing down and downshifting is giving me a hard time still. Like, for example, i'm in 3rd and slowing down... I like to drop it in 2nd when i get down around 1200-1000 rpm. When I do that, it still jerks on me.
Personally, I wouldn't and don't do that, and most car manuals I have read lately advise against it. Just keep it in 3rd until you drop under 1k rpm and then push the clutch in.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
Starrbuck said:
Personally, I wouldn't and don't do that, and most car manuals I have read lately advise against it. Just keep it in 3rd until you drop under 1k rpm and then push the clutch in.
Good advice if you're in traffic headed to the mall for a latte'.

If you want to use engine braking to set up for a turn and come blasting out in an appropriate gear, not so good advice. Likewise if you just want to drive smoothly and have the right gear at hand all the time.

Downshifting one gear at 1,200 RPM should not harm your drivetrain especially if you match your revs properly. That's the way I drive pretty much all the time except for the aforementioned mall traffic.

With that said, I wouldn't try rev matching or aggressive downshifts until you are comfortable with the car.

Pay attention to the change in engine speed when you shift from 3rd to 2nd at a steady speed. You should see about a 500 RPM increase. That is roughly the amount you will need to compensate for when downshifting. Keep in mind that if you are also braking hard the rev match will be constantly decreasing as you lose speed during your gear change.

Now memorize the RPM change for each gear change. Keep in mind that if you drop more than one gear, the RPM change is additive. For instance drop from 5th to 3rd and add 500RPM + 500RPM. You'll need 1,000 RPM more engine speed to make the change smoothly. After a while you won't need to think about it. You'll be able to feel & hear the right RPM. Hard to describe in text.

The whole point here is to keep the engine squarely in the fat part of the torque & power curve. Pretty easy to do with the LS2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Something I haven't seen anyone else mention is that your transmission will break in and get a little more 'fluid' feeling after you get a few thousand miles on her.

My M6 took about 3-5 K miles before I felt like it was gliding between the gears. Prior to that, the shifts were much more mechanical.

Hill debate? When I'm sitting on a hill in traffic, I use the power of the car to keep me standing still and not rolling backwards. You will have to get use to the clutch 'sweet spot' before you can do this. Basically, you find the right balance of throttle to clutch release and use the power of the car to keep still instead of the brake. This way when it comes time to go there's no guesswork of not letting enough clutch out or engaging the gas, you're already in the spot to safely go forward only.

Congrats and good luck on learning the stick. It was the only way to go for me in this car.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
MeanGoat said:
Something I haven't seen anyone else mention is that your transmission will break in and get a little more 'fluid' feeling after you get a few thousand miles on her.

My M6 took about 3-5 K miles before I felt like it was gliding between the gears. Prior to that, the shifts were much more mechanical.

Hill debate? When I'm sitting on a hill in traffic, I use the power of the car to keep me standing still and not rolling backwards. You will have to get use to the clutch 'sweet spot' before you can do this. Basically, you find the right balance of throttle to clutch release and use the power of the car to keep still instead of the brake. This way when it comes time to go there's no guesswork of not letting enough clutch out or engaging the gas, you're already in the spot to safely go forward only.

Congrats and good luck on learning the stick. It was the only way to go for me in this car.
You will be replacing a clutch soon.

Signed

Nostradamus.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
btchplz said:
Now all I got to learn is hot to burn out in a stand still. Anyone else care to chime in and tell me the secret??:D
Secret??? You've got 400HP & 400 LbFt with a manual transmission.

  1. Apply brake and take aim
  2. Lift off brake
  3. Rev engine to 5,000 RPM+
  4. Let the clutch out very quickly in one fluid motion (don't dump it)
  5. Stay on the gas, don't wussy out when the fun starts.
  6. Correct for rear end slide with steering lest you end up in a ditch
  7. Watch white tire smoke in rear view mirror
  8. Drive to Goodrich dealer for $600 of new rubber + $100 mount and balance.

Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Wing_Nut said:
Secret??? You've got 400HP & 400 LbFt with a manual transmission.
  1. Apply brake and take aim
  2. Rev engine to 5,000 RPM+
  3. Lift off brake and let the clutch out very quickly in one fluid motion (don't dump it)
  4. Correct for rear end slide with steering lest you end up in a ditch
  5. Watch white tire smoke in rear view mirror
  6. Drive to Goodrich dealer for $600 of new rubber
Enjoy!
Are you three footed? I'm not. My step-brother tells me this techinique all the time and I don't have the balls or desire to trash my brakes to perform it. Would rather go line-lock route.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
MeanGoat said:
Are you three footed? I'm not. My step-brother tells me this techinique all the time and I don't have the balls or desire to trash my brakes to perform it. Would rather go line-lock route.
Aha, I see what you mean....I had steps 2 & 3 reversed. Fixed original post.

No no no. Three legged but only two feet. The clutch is in when you are in countdown mode. Lift off the brake at standstill and slip your foot to gas and rev to 5,000+ then let out clutch. All of this happens in a fraction of a second. No stress to brakes at all.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top