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I've NEVER had this problem. I take my car to a transmission and clutch shop to have a new clutch installed and I get a call back a couple hours later saying they can't start the car because the key won't turn. Is this a scam to try and get more service done, or could they have accidentally done something to cause this?
 

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Mine done the same, I took mine apart lubed it up with General Purpose greese no more problems. The dealer just made a new key for me and kicked me in the butt and said it was good.:rolleyes:
 

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Weight on a key chain could in time cause problems with the key cylinder, or a wearing of the key itself. All those keys many have dangling on the hoop adds weight. When the key is in the cylinder the weight of all those other keys and or other items on the key chain is pulling down on the key fob and putting pressure on the key in the cylinder. All the added weight can cause a wearing problem inside the cylinder, and or cutting a grove or deep scratches in the key. To avoid this possible problem, only have the car's keys on that chain.

The best choice for lube in the cylinder is graphite. Graphite is a dry lube and bonds to metal surfaces causing a slick surface. Graphite is available in spray, and powder. I would use spray and not powder in a cylinder. The powder will cause a packing action if used too heavy. Any type of grease can be easily transfered to your pants pockets, and lint, and dirt will find its way into the cylinder sticking to grease. This in time will cause a gunky build up. WD-40 and a like will attract lint as well in time.
 

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Weight on a key chain could in time cause problems with the key cylinder, or a wearing of the key itself. All those keys many have dangling on the hoop adds weight. When the key is in the cylinder the weight of all those other keys and or other items on the key chain is pulling down on the key fob and putting pressure on the key in the cylinder. All the added weight can cause a wearing problem inside the cylinder, and or cutting a grove or deep scratches in the key. To avoid this possible problem, only have the car's keys on that chain.
:agree
The best choice for lube in the cylinder is graphite. Graphite is a dry lube and bonds to metal surfaces causing a slick surface. Graphite is available in spray, and powder. I would use spray and not powder in a cylinder. The powder will cause a packing action if used too heavy. Any type of grease can be easily transfered to your pants pockets, and lint, and dirt will find its way into the cylinder sticking to grease. This in time will cause a gunky build up. WD-40 and a like will attract lint as well in time.
In our lock cylinders the graphite only lubes the tumbers not the actual part that causes the problem. Graphite does not get behind the cylinder where the pin and cylinder contact. I used graphite on mine and still had the same problem until I took it apart and seen what the problem was, it was the pin in the lock cylinder binding causing the key to not turn at times. I've done mine and 6QTS11OZ i guess his feel alittle better too after we took care of his.
 

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If there is a mechanical problem, and if I am thinking this right the pin is catching, and binding? It would need more than some lube. I would tend to think in time, the problem would resurface. The grease will mask the problem and cause a temporary fix until the grease eventually dissipates causing the catching again. Unless of course the binding friction from the pin to the cylinder elongates the hole? Thats just my guess.
 

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If there is a mechanical problem, and if I am thinking this right the pin is catching, and binding? It would need more than some lube. I would tend to think in time, the problem would resurface. The grease will mask the problem and cause a temporary fix until the grease eventually dissipates causing the catching again. Unless of course the binding friction from the pin to the cylinder elongates the hole? Thats just my guess.
You are correct the pin is catching. Most people including me only have this problem when it is very hot out. Metal expands at differant rates. People have been taking a dremal and reworking the hole, some the problem comes back. I think one way of fixing the problem is making the cylinder or pin out of a different metal. The factory put grease in there but not enough. Greese helps lubes things, lowers the friction and keep them from gauling just like your wheel bearings.
 

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what's the mileage on your cars with stuck lock cylinders? mine was filthy from machine shop debris and that caused some tumblers to bend/break but i never had a problem out of the lock not turning with the key properly inserted.
 

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Mine was notchy when I bought it "new" with 4,800miles. I don't remember when it finally got stuck maybe it had 18,xxx miles.
 

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My key wouldn't turn last summer. I had to have my wife bring extra key and it turned. BUT, it happened again two weeks ago. I had to have my GTO towed to the local GM dealer. They ordered a lock block and plan to replace it. It hasn't been replaced as of today. According to the owner's manual, the immobilizer activated.
 

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My car has been at the GM dealer for 4 weeks to replace the lock cylinder. I thought the initial problem was that the immobilizer activated and it still may be. That's a different topic though. My current mileage is around 23k.

The service manager said the tech had to drill out the key/lock cylinder because the pin that holds it in wouldn't come out.

HOPEFULLY, I'll get it back this week!
 

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I got my car back yesterday. The total was $375. $120 for towing 2-3 miles to dealership. $60 for new key cylinder. $140 for 2+ hours of labor. $55 for taxes, shop equipment.

The service manager said the pin would not release that is the reason it had to be drilled out.
 

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I got my car back yesterday. The total was $375. $120 for towing 2-3 miles to dealership. $60 for new key cylinder. $140 for 2+ hours of labor. $55 for taxes, shop equipment.

The service manager said the pin would not release that is the reason it had to be drilled out.
:confused Why would they tell you they had to drill a pin out? But you put down they ordered a key cylinder. And it only took me about an hour maybe less to remove and install.
 

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I believe the cylinder had the "groove" as described on previous posts, which caused the cylinder not to turn. The pin that holds the cylinder in place would not come out so it had to be drilled to get the cylinder out of the column.
I think they had originally had planned to replace the cylinder only but it wouldn't come out. I even took pictures from one of the first posts the illustrates how to remove the cylinder.
I have the same keys, nothing was re-programmed as far a I know.

Oh well, it's done.
 

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My car has been at the GM dealer for 4 weeks to replace the lock cylinder. I thought the initial problem was that the immobilizer activated and it still may be. That's a different topic though. My current mileage is around 23k.

The service manager said the tech had to drill out the key/lock cylinder because the pin that holds it in wouldn't come out.

HOPEFULLY, I'll get it back this week!
I believe the cylinder had the "groove" as described on previous posts, which caused the cylinder not to turn. The pin that holds the cylinder in place would not come out so it had to be drilled to get the cylinder out of the column.
I think they had originally had planned to replace the cylinder only but it wouldn't come out. I even took pictures from one of the first posts the illustrates how to remove the cylinder.
I have the same keys, nothing was re-programmed as far a I know.

Oh well, it's done.
not certain but i have a feeling you got stiffed. if indeed they replaced the lock cylinder my excuse for the length of time is they could have ordered it, the order got canceled and when you came to check on it it made them say "o crap, we ordered it and they canceled the order so we'll reorder it this time" and you have a similar tumbler set to the original. in all honesty once i got into breaking my car apart it didn't talk too long for my locksmith to pop the cylinder out and have it into a million pieces. no drilling was required and i had a half of a key stuck up in there that wouldn't allow the cylinder to "turn" so it would "pop" out.
 

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I believe the cylinder had the "groove" as described on previous posts, which caused the cylinder not to turn. The pin that holds the cylinder in place would not come out so it had to be drilled to get the cylinder out of the column.
I think they had originally had planned to replace the cylinder only but it wouldn't come out.
I even took pictures from one of the first posts the illustrates how to remove the cylinder.
I have the same keys, nothing was re-programmed as far a I know.

Oh well, it's done.
:confused I removed a couple of lock cylinders and I still don't know what your talking about. Don't get me wrong its not your fault but I think the dealers screwed you. Yeah its a done deal but that just bothers the crap out of me how the stealership gets over on people. Did not have to replace your keys because they only replaced the outer portion of the cylinder so your tumbelers are the same. Well you got it taken care of.
 

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So this just happened to me yesterday. Was going to take the cylinder out and clean and dremel down but cant even get that out because the key will not turn to the On position so pushing down in that little hole on top does nothing. Any suggestions? After reading a few pages on the LS1GTO forum I found in my case the dealer ends up having to replace the whole steering column. apparently it runs about $1400. In some cases the dealer replaced the parts but made them pay labor even though their cars were out of warranty. Now I didnt buy my car from a GM dealer ship. Think there any chance of them doing that for me even though I didn't buy my car from them?:confused
 
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