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Discussion Starter · #281 · (Edited)
I see red but in a good way!
Finally laid on some paint.
Here's what I've done since my last post:

I totally washed down the inside of my work room using a garden hose and brush on a pole. The ceiling and walls too.

Wet sanded the body using 500 paper and then washed it down inside and out using Dawn soap. I then blew it dry, moved back into my paint room and let a fan blow on it for a couple of days.

I then put together my filter wall frame and attached the new spraybooth filters to it. Then attached it to the garage door frame using a foam rubber seal.

I then masked off everything really well around the body. I used plastic to make a skirt around the body to keep overspray from getting to anything underneath. I taped the skirt to the floor.



Spraying base:

First, I sprayed on a single 35% reduced coat of SPI epoxy primer to use as sealer. The purpose of this is to get better adhesion of the base coat.
After spraying that I waited an hour to start spraying the base and I sprayed on 3 coats.


It went pretty well but not perfect.
Relatively smooth and didn't get any runs but I died get several dust nibs. Not horrible but more than I hoped for with my filtration setup and steps I used. Most seemed to be on the top surfaces and not large. I called Barry at SPI for advice after the second coat of base. After discussing a few things he advised me to ground the body and spray a 3rd coat then do a bit of sanding out of the nibs after waiting overnight and then spray some more base. He said I could spot spray if I wanted to and feather the spray out around the areas.
I had pounded in a length of rebar several years ago for grounding to many years ago and I luckily found it, hooked up a wire and then sprayed the 3 coat.
Here's a close-up of some of the nibs:

So I did exactly what Barry said and the next day (yesterday) sanded the nibs using 1500 grit paper and spot sprayed more base over the areas. It's best to wait until the next day to spray the clear after base so waited until today to shoot it.

Since it was chilly this morning, I waited until noon to get started. I sprayed on 4 coats which will be plenty for a full color sand and buff if I choose to later. It went well. I have some dust nibs but I don't see color to them at this point. I think they sand and buff out just fine. No runs either. I am both relieved and happy. I love the color and can't wait to see it out in the sun and at dusk.






 

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I see red but in a good way!
Finally laid on some paint.
Here's what I've done since my last post:

I totally washed down the inside of my work room using a garden hose and brush on a pole. The ceiling and walls too.

Wet sanded the body using 500 paper and then washed it down inside and out using Dawn soap. I then blew it dry, moved back into my paint room and let a fan blow on it for a couple of days.

I then put together my filter wall frame and attached the new spraybooth filters to it. Then attached it to the garage door frame using a foam rubber seal.

I then masked off everything really well around the body. I used plastic to make a skirt around the body to keep overspray from getting to anything underneath. I taped the skirt to the floor.



Spraying base:

First, I sprayed on a single 35% reduced coat of SPI epoxy primer to use as sealer. The purpose of this is to get better adhesion of the base coat.
After spraying that I waited an hour to start spraying the base and I sprayed on 3 coats.


It went pretty well but not perfect.
Relatively smooth and didn't get any runs but I died get several dust nibs. Not horrible but more than I hoped for with my filtration setup and steps I used. Most seemed to be on the top surfaces and not large. I called Barry at SPI for advice after the second coat of base. After discussing a few things he advised me to ground the body and spray a 3rd coat then do a bit of sanding out of the nibs after waiting overnight and then spray some more base. He said I could spot spray if I wanted to and feather the spray out around the areas.
I had pounded in a length of rebar several years ago for grounding to many years ago and I luckily found it, hooked up a wire and then sprayed the 3 coat.
Here's a close-up of some of the nibs:

So I did exactly what Barry said and the next day (yesterday) sanded the nibs using 1500 grit paper and spot sprayed more base over the areas. It's best to wait until the next day to spray the clear after base so waited until today to shoot it.

Since it was chilly this morning, I waited until noon to get started. I sprayed on 4 coats which will be plenty for a full color sand and buff if I choose to later. It went well. I have some dust nibs but I don't see color to them at this point. I think they sand and buff out just fine. No runs either. I am both relieved and happy. I love the color and can't wait to see it out in the sun and at dusk.






Looks great 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #283 · (Edited)
Thanks guys!
Here's a few additional photos from today:



I'll work towards painting the doors and fenders in the next paint session. I will have to wet sand them and use Scotchbrite on the door jambs first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #284 ·
Progress this week:

I got several of the body panels wet sanded and scuffed and set in the workroom for paint. While wet sanding the d/s fender I noticed 2 small low spots and sanded through to the urethane primer in both areas. I did get the low spots out but needed to spot spray epoxy primer over both areas.
I wanted to get the underside of the hood painted before wet sanding the top and got that done. Sprayed 3 coats of 25% reduced black epoxy primer.


Yesterday, I sprayed epoxy as a sealer followed by 3 coats of base on all the rest of the panels (just the bottom side of the trunk lid).


And today I sprayed on 4 coats of clear on everything except just 2 coats on the underside of the trunk lid. Just 2 coats on the door jambs as well since these areas wont get color sanded and buffed.









So all that remains to paint are the tops of the hood and trunk lid and the d/s fender, trunk lid hinges and the hood scoop inserts. It looks like the weather will be conducive for being able to get that done this coming week.
 
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Looking great! That is certainly bright red, they'll think you're the fire chief driving around 👍 So do you paint the interior black or is it staying that way?
 

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Discussion Starter · #286 ·
Thanks! I'm keeping the Parchment interior. I think the Matador Red with Parchment is a really nice combination. I'm staying with a white top too.
With this red, it really depends on how much light there is (and camera exposure) to how bright it looks. It's a fairly dark red and looks very dark at dusk and at night. I really like that effect.
 

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Nice, I was thinking more about the primered interior structure is that staying this way or getting paint black?
 

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Discussion Starter · #288 · (Edited)
I'll leave it the way it is. I don't see a need to spray what can't be seen when it is already protected.
 
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Discussion Starter · #289 ·
Done painting!

I sprayed epoxy sealer and base yesterday and then sprayed the clear today.
All went pretty well except for a couple of sags on the hood with 1 little run. I sprayed the clear just a little too heavy on one of the 4 coats.
I believe I will be able to sand them out OK. I think I'll try spreading a thin coat of glazing putty over and around the sag and then sand. When the putty is sanded it off so is the sag and run. I haven't done this before but I heard it works very well.






Other updates:

I stopped by the upholstery shop this week and they are going to get my convertible top ordered. His preferred brand is Robbins and has been buying from them for many years. I project it will be next summer before I'm ready to take the car down there but better to order stuff early with all the supply chain issues going on. He hasn't gotten the seats done yet but it sounded like he would get to those in a month or two.
I also ordered door panels, convertible top boot, well liner and a few other items from Legendary. They project it will be August before I will get the panels! I didn't expect quite that long of lead time.
 

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I don't see any runs, looks great and now you're probably going to hold your breath and almost be naked around the car to not cause any damage putting it together 😉 Are you going to assemble then cut and buff, seems easier that way idk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #291 ·
I don't see any runs, looks great and now you're probably going to hold your breath and almost be naked around the car to not cause any damage putting it together 😉 Are you going to assemble then cut and buff, seems easier that way idk.
Here's the 2 sagged areas on the hood:


As it hangs the sags are in the upper right and lower left.
These are the only sags that I did on the entire job. Hanging the hood probably made it more difficult for me to keep at the correct distance with my spray gun.

Also here's a photo that shows a bit more orange peel and a spot where I color sanded a bit. After I shut my exhaust fans down a bug must have come in and landed on the door there. It came right out easily using the 1000 grit paper. As you can see the orange peel flattens right out as well.
 

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You'll get it figured out and can't wait to see it buffed, going to look amazing. I guess laying the hood flat would prevent sags but also harder to reach, you might have to walk around it, being up right you can chase the overspray down.
 

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Easiest way to deal with sags/runs is to use single edge razor blades. I learned this trick from Kevin Tetz's "Paintucation" videos.
The process:
  • "Drag" a single edge razor blade in one direction over some 1000 grit paper a few times. What you're doing is creating a burr on one side of the edge.
  • Slightly bend the razor blade into a gentle curve so that the burr you just made is on the "outside" of the curve radius.
  • You've just made a small plane. Gently drag it over the sag/run until you've levelled it with the surrounding paint. With each pass you should see that you're shaving off a very thin layer of paint.
  • When the blade quits cutting, make another one.
  • Repeat until the sag is gone, then continue with color sanding/cutting/buffing.
Putting that curve into the blade makes it really easy to control the cut so that you're only touching the high spots and helps make sure you don't dig the corners of the blade into the paint.

Works great.

Bear
 

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Easiest way to deal with sags/runs is to use single edge razor blades. I learned this trick from Kevin Tetz's "Paintucation" videos.
The process:
  • "Drag" a single edge razor blade in one direction over some 1000 grit paper a few times. What you're doing is creating a burr on one side of the edge.
  • Slightly bend the razor blade into a gentle curve so that the burr you just made is on the "outside" of the curve radius.
  • You've just made a small plane. Gently drag it over the sag/run until you've levelled it with the surrounding paint. With each pass you should see that you're shaving off a very thin layer of paint.
  • When the blade quits cutting, make another one.
  • Repeat until the sag is gone, then continue with color sanding/cutting/buffing.
Putting that curve into the blade makes it really easy to control the cut so that you're only touching the high spots and helps make sure you don't dig the corners of the blade into the paint.

Works great.

Bear
Sounds scary but if you say so...I would be practicing on the neighbors car first 😉
 

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Yeah, it does sound scary - but it really does work great and it's a whole lot easier to control than sanding is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #296 ·
It does sound scary to me. I'm going to have to find some youtube videos of that process. Just don't know if my hands are steady enough to put a razor blade on paint. I've also heard a nib file can work well for this and might look into that too.
It does seem to me that using the glaze trick might be the most fail-safe route. Looks like a slow process but I've only got 2 areas to deal with. I did stop at the local auto body supply store yesterday and bought a tube of Dolphin Glaze.
 
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I know Kevin demonstrates it in his videos, but I haven't found a public copy of that yet. There's a YouTube out there of a different guy doing something similar, but he does it differently. His method isn't nearly as good or as effective as Kevin's. He doesn't put a burr on the blade and he doesn't bend it into a curve. Both of those are key to the process.
If you want to try it, make an intentional run on a piece of plywood or something that doesn't matter and experiment.
I did it to fix a couple spots on my GTO, my very first ever attempt at painting a car, and it worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #298 ·
Bending the blade to put a curve on it makes sense but I don't understand about what you call putting a burr on the blade and what difference that would make.
 

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Imagine the extreme sharp edge of the blade - "just the tip". Now imagine that whole edge, just the tiniest few thousandths of an inch, pushed slightly "sideways" after dragging it at a slant over the sandpaper. That's the burr I'm talking about. Now, if you bend the blade into a very slight U shape, so that the burr now is on the "outside" edge of the U, you can drag it over the run. Because of the curve shape, only a very small section of the blade will be in contact with the paint, and again because of that curve, the corners of the blade will stay safely up and away from the paint surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #300 ·
OK. Good explanation. It's a visualization you can make in your head but wouldn't actually see without a microscope.
 
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