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Discussion Starter #141 (Edited)
I got the rear suspension installed. Some brake lines too. I bought the frame supports from Inline Tube and painted with epoxy as they come unpainted. Everything I've read says its a good thing to add them as the factory did on the 4 speed cars only.


I painted the new drums and brake cylinders with Duplicolor cast color to hinder them from rusting.

I started assembling the front suspension too. I'm ready to install the springs but I'm waiting for a new spring compressor that I ordered. I have one but don't trust it anymore and I'm not sure I would trust the loaners from Autozone either. The one I ordered is an OTC 7045B but it is backordered so it may be a while before I get it.

I got my Borgeson 800 steering box delivered and installed. The reviews on this are excellent.

These cross shafts are original but all the hardware is new. I recorded what the old shims were and installed new shims that were the same size to use as a starting point for an alignment. The upper and lower bushings are Prothane. The seller of the car had bought these. I greased them up well with their special grease. I bought a tub of it as I wanted to put more on than the little tubes they give you.
The rear bushings are all stock-type Moog replacements.

I also started working on the interior and seat parts that I brought back home from the interior shop last week.

I used a stripping disc to get the glue off the rear panels and blasted them. I'll paint these with SPI epoxy at the same time as when I paint the body floor. I'm planning on doing that fairly soon.

I also blasted, painted and lubed the bucket seat tracks. I used motorcycle chain lube that's kind of a wax designed so dust and dirt doesn't readily stick to it.

Here's the rest of the parts I need to go thru and decide what to clean up and what to replace.

I stopped by the machine shop this morning to take him some parts that I had bought. Spark plugs, wires, loom kit and an oil filter. He said he won't be able to start on the engine this week but next week sounds like a for sure.
I'm thinking my Art Carr 200-R4 should be here next week if he sticks to the 1 month estimate he gave me.
 

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1968 Pontiac GTO Convertible
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Excellent work and excellent writeup. Thanks for contributing to the community.
 

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Discussion Starter #143
Excellent work and excellent writeup. Thanks for contributing to the community.
Thanks!
I'm glad to take these photos and do this documentation for showing here. It's part of the fun. I get to show off a bit and it has the possibility to help others.

I left out a photo I wanted to show yesterday.
I painted all the steering linkage parts with Duplicolor cast engine enamel and the dust shields with aluminum paint. I've got new Timken bearings so it's all ready to install once I get the springs in.
 

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Discussion Starter #145
Oh man it makes me want to go and start my project :)
Then I guess I'm doing my job here!
Any new estimates of when you will start on it? I hope you've been able to have some fun with the car since you've had it.

A bit done today:

I thought about painting the body floor with epoxy today and changed my mind. I'll wait until I have the body back on the frame so I can get all the bracing out of the way.
My intention is to install the engine and transmission and then wrap the entire chassis in plastic stretch wrap right before setting the body on.
So I continued to get a few more things installed on the frame today instead. I got more brake lines installed and all the e-brake cables.



The clips with the bolts you see are the originals that I blasted and painted with Duplicolor aluminum engine enamel. I wont use original clips along the straight part of the frame rail that also clip the fuel lines in. They won't work since I need to run the fuel lines different from stock for the fuel injection. I haven't bought any fuel line yet but I will need to run 2 - 3/8" lines for the feed and return. I'm still studying on how I want to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #146 (Edited)
Decided what I'm going to do for fuel lines. I bought a stock type pre-bent fuel line from Inline tube to run on along the driver side frame with the rear brake line. That allows me to use stock clamps along the straight part of the frame and I ordered those too. For the return line, I decided to run that on the passenger side but will bend that myself. I ordered a roll of 3/8" nicopp tubing that's easier to bend than regular steel fuel line. And I will use existing holes in the frame for new 3/8" clamps with 5/16" bolts so I can use factory holes. Even though this is a resto-mod, I don't want to drill new holes when I don't have to.

I haven't done a lot of new things in the shop since my last post. I've been spending a lot of time on the computer researching parts. My interior guy emailed me and said he wants me to buy new seat foam, so before ordering that from Ames, I worked up an order with a lot other parts from Ames and got that done this morning. I went though all the small parts for the seats and cleaned up and painted some and ordered others from Ames that I wanted to replace. I also got the small parts cleaned, blasted and painted where necessary and wrapped and ready to go back to the interior shop when the new stuff gets here.

I installed the most of the steering linkage but haven't tightened all up yet. I haven't heard anything on when my new spring compressor will ship but I'm hoping not long after I finish installing the fuel lines.

I moved all the rest of the things out of my storage shed and lined them up. I figured I would try and get the paint stripped and get my blasting done while I'm waiting for my engine and transmission. The weather window for me to do outside blasting is running short. Not too many cool days left here before the heat sets in for good.

I got these out too. I'll want to blast them after I get the crud off and repair the sloppy access hole.

So my plan after putting the body back on the frame is to install all these things in a mock-up. I'll then get everything aligned the way I want and start the primering and blocking phase. But I will blow it all back apart for painting it all.

So I got a call from the machine shop on Friday. They got started on my engine. The previous machine work on the block checked out good. The cylinders were a little too tight for the pistons but is what you want before honing them. Evidently he's got a super good honing machine too. He didn't like the rope type rear main in the gasket kit I gave him and wanted me to get one from Butler along with a new oil pump shaft. I got that rush delivered and it got here today. Sounds like he will pretty much have the engine complete this week but it may be another week until he's ready to run it.
He did want me to buy the fuel pressure regulator I was going to use rather than the one on his dyno machine. I had to do quite a bit of research on that before making a decision. I got some help on the Edelbrock forum for that decision too. I'm getting a 58 psi one from Edelbrock that mounts on the fuel rail. They also gave me some advice on the forum for software parameters to use for the initial programming.
 

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Looks great and moving right along. I suggest you might want to consider putting some form of water proof sealant on the tops.bottoms of the body bushings when you are ready for final tightening. This will keep moisture out from between the metal frame/under body and it'll never need another repair in its lifetime.

Did you address the inside of the frame with any protection? I used the Eastwood protectant that has the 14" extended hose/spray nozzle to get up inside the frame to coat it and protect it. I used the zinc green colored spray. It comes in black as well. Very thin and runny like POR-15 (may even be POR-15?) so it'll get in all the crevices and it'll run out all over the outside of the frame in some spots when spraying it.

 

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Discussion Starter #148
Thanks Jim.
I know what you are saying but I have a different school of thought on both things. I consider the metal on top of and the bottom of the body mounts already sealed as they are protected with SPI epoxy primer. Also, I never worry about or spray anything inside a frame. This frame is solid after 50 years and it's going to be treated much better in the next 50 years and beyond since it's going to be driven and treated completely different than it was before. I'll only drive it in the rain if I get caught in it unexpectedly and it will never see snow or a salty road.
That said, I do have a few cans of that Eastwood product. I've already used it inside the lower rear control arms that I boxed in. I plan on using some inside the rocker panels too. I'm going to try and drip SPI epoxy primer from above into the areas from the inside where the quarter panels meet the outer wheelhouses. If can't get in there very well, I'll use the Eastwood stuff there too.
 

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Discussion Starter #149
I got some work done today using a stripping disc today.
Done with using the discs now. Next I will blast the undersides, door jambs and anywhere else that wasn't practical to use the disc on. Everywhere that I did use the disc will get sanded with 80 grit on a D/A before priming.

The metal looks really good.
No surprises other than a so-called body man drilled 3 holes in the passenger door to hold his filler skim coat to a couple of small door dings.

A few hail dings in the hood but good other than that:

Just need a good day for an outside blasting session soon. There's rain in the forecast for the next several days so it may be awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #150 (Edited)
I removed, disassembled and blasted the door hinges in the cabinet. They are in perfect condition but and the bushings had very little wear. The d/s detent roller had just a little wobble in it but the p/s was good but decided I should replace them both. I ordered a kit from Inline tube that includes new pins, bushings and the rollers.

Got the holes in the doors welded up. I was able to hammer and dolly the area to get smoothed a little better too. Hit it just a tad with the shrinking disc as well.

I started on repairing the core support today. It was more complicated than I thought to remove the braces at the frame mount area than I thought it would be. There's a flange on both sides of the brace and on side if it is sandwiched between 2 other flanges and spot welded on both sides.


I couldn't get my spot weld drill bit into this area so I had to grind them out.

The other side:

Most people would probably opt to buy a replacement core support but I'd rather repair it and have an original part. I like to keep original parts when I can. I don't have to worry about the fit and quality that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #151
I got the core support repair finished.

Opened holes to good metal and squared off and cleaned up of rust around the edges. I blasted the brackets in my cabinet. I then made the patches out of 16 gauge sheetmetal.


Patches welded in:




Ground smooth and plug weld holes drilled in bracket:


Welded in the brackets:


Ground smooth and holes drilled. Took a while to make sure I got them in the right place. The holes on the frame that they match up to are 39" apart center-to-center. I tripled checked my measurements onto the core support before drilling. I drilled the holes out smaller and used a carbide burr the rest of the way.




Next up is using a wire wheel to remove the undercoating from the inner fenders. I got a start on that today. It was put on thicker here than anywhere else on the car. I've already made a mess. Then I'll weld up the ugly access hole.
 
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