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My original 65 GTO headliner looked great until I noticed a stitched seam opening up. I wanted to install 3 point seat belts, so the time was right to rip out the old headliner. Good time to install new soundproof material too. I read many posts and articles saying the “right” way to replace a headliner is to take out the front and rear glass. I did not take the glass out and got the job done by myself. I did mark the original hole location (there are 3) for the rods and numbered each rod to make sure to I didn’t mix them up during reassembly ( all rods are different lengths). After wire wheel brushing off the old adhesive, I dry fitted the rods and held the liner up with spring clips to ensure centering of the liner looked okay. I took this step because I failed to mark driver vs passenger side (or left/right, if you prefer) on each rod. Some folks claim it is necessary. After the test fit, I sprayed 3m adhesive and secured everything with paper spring clips. Front to rear and then side to side. The area above the sail panels was problematic. I carefully cut the liner to relieve the curved shape and pulled the strips down behind the horizontal bar behind the sail panel. When I was satisfied with eliminating most of the wrinkles I sprayed 3M on the bar and used sheet metal screws and washers to keep everything tight (see photos). I have not taken a heat gun to the liner yet, may stop at good enough. Not happy with wrinkles in sail panels I recovered, so I have new ones on order from Ames. Reason for posting is to assert you don’t have to remove the glass to change your headliner. This is a one person job, although if you have not removed the bucket seats I could see a second person being highly desired.
 

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Headliners can be a PITA, Not sure but it looks like you have the liner behind the tack-strip and folded up. Then have large screws w/washers?
If that is correct you have it pulled it incorrectly. The headliner should be stretched over and stapled to the tack-strip.
I think some of your ear-muff/sail panel wrinkles may be from the oversize screws. Just a thought.
 

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Congrats noangel you definitely picked a project to do that is in nobody’s top 10 list. Almost would want to drop a transmission out instead, I think a lot of shops while restoring cars will put the headliner in before the glass for better access during installation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Headliners can be a PITA, Not sure but it looks like you have the liner behind the tack-strip and folded up. Then have large screws w/washers?
If that is correct you have it pulled it incorrectly. The headliner should be stretched over and stapled to the tack-strip.
I think some of your ear-muff/sail panel wrinkles may be from the oversize screws. Just a thought.
You are correct. Strips from headliner are behind the strip. I tried pulling strips from the front, but couldn’t get results I wanted. Screws and washers are not tall. If anything they may make the panel stand off a bit. I will remove them to see. I think wrinkles in the sail are because I failed to leave enough fabric on the sides for stretching. Will re-attack when I get new sail panels. Appreciate the input.
Added a couple more pics. Will be glad when this is done.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Headliners can be a PITA, Not sure but it looks like you have the liner behind the tack-strip and folded up. Then have large screws w/washers?
If that is correct you have it pulled it incorrectly. The headliner should be stretched over and stapled to the tack-strip.
I think some of your ear-muff/sail panel wrinkles may be from the oversize screws. Just a thought.
GTOJUNIOR,
When my new sail panels arrived I removed the screws and washers and folded the strips in front of the tack strip as you suggested. Not sure what you meant by “stapled”. I used 3m adhesive again. I checked for clearance of the washers and screws and they weren’t the problem, but I left them off for the second attempt. I think running the strips behind the tack strip caused a gap at the top of the sail. Wrinkles were operator error on my part. It’s all good now, thanks again. Wife said it looks crisp, uniform and new. Moving on to carpeting.
Frank
 

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The tack strip retainers originally had hardboard composite within the channel and this was where the liner would get pulled down and stapled.
Nowadays the tack strip is a hard vinyl composite available in many sizes. This is glued into the channel and can be stapled like the oe composite board.
136328
 
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