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When installing the cork oil pan gasket(on the block), should i put that on first THEN the rear cork seal sitting atop the pan seal ?
Is a small bead in the center good enough,or do I need to coat the whole surface?
thank you
 

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When installing the cork oil pan gasket(on the block), should i put that on first THEN the rear cork seal sitting atop the pan seal ?
Is a small bead in the center good enough,or do I need to coat the whole surface?
thank you
Hi Topkat,
The sequence doesn't matter much. Notice that the cork seal that fits into the groove on the rear main cap has a bevel cut on both ends. When properly installed those edges will fit flat against the block. If you install it upside down, only the "points" of the seal ends will touch the block and it will leak. The ends of the side gaskets should have some small notches in them for the ends of the cork seal to fit into. It helps if you put that cork seal into a small drinking glass or coffee cup so that it's curved along the inside edge of the glass, and let it sit that way for a few hours. That'll help put a curved "set" into the seal so that the ends don't try to "pop out" as much while you're trying to assemble everything. There's no pat answer as to how much sealant to use. I'd recommend following the instructions on the sealant. You want "enough" to get it to seal but not "so much" that it oozes out from the gasket and gets into your oiling systems. Whatever gets into the pan will eventually wind up sucked up against the oil filter inlet screen, and the fragments that are small enough to get past the screen will wind up in your oil filter, so obviously you want to minimize that.

It's not an exact science....

Bear
 

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Total agreement with Bear.

Topkat I have seen some pan rail gaskets that you have to notch them with a razor blade where it meets with the square cork gasket a little u shape.

I like to use Pematex High tack sealant to glue the square cork to the cap.
 

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Those holes are "alignmernt lugs" used by the machinist that intially sets the block "up" for machining. All the other dimensions "key" on those two holes.

When installing the "lip" (rear), as Bear says, curl it into a cup (we use a spray paint "cap"). Be sure the bevel is "in"

Apply a 1/8" bead of Ultra-Black in the groove, and a contiguous "dab" where the ends of the lip seal will sit. Put the strip in place and set the pan on it (no bolts). Allow to set over night. Trim the rail gaskets to fit. No "overlap" of gaskets. The front may also need a little trim, depending on the brand of gasket. Lay it all out and check before "gluing" anything else "down". Remove all of it except the lip seal (cork strip). Put another bead of RTV around the bolt holes at the rear, and in a single action, over the entire length of the lip seal (again, 1/8" bead is all you need). Put a 1/2 long bead where the timing cover, block and pan all come "together" (across the rail to the timing cover). Add the rails and the front "lip". Put another bead over the strip and around the bolt holes at the rear (SPARINGLY) and another 1/2" bead at the front. Carefully lay the pan in place and start the four REAR bolts. Next, start the front two that go into the block (not timing cover). EASE the rear bolts down "snug" (not tight yet). Front ones next... Install the rest of the rail bolts. Snug tyhe front ones again, and then start the four in the timing cover. Starting in the center of the rails, begin snugging all the bolts, alternating "side side/front back". Allow it to sit over night again. Tighten the bolts. 18 lbs. is "spec", but I've found that to "squeeze" the gasket out if Felpro. So, tighten them until the gasket starts to "move". No further.

This process has proven to work well with the stock type gaskets. Again, as Bear says, a LITTLE. A "lot" is NOT "better". No glue of any kind necessary on any of the "flat" surfaces of the pan, block, or cover.

All this can be eliminated by using the BOP 1-piece pan gasket, similar to those used on modern Ford and Chevy V8s. We've installed several and they are VERY good.

FWIW

Jim

p.s. Howdy Rob... :)-
 

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I agree. With P-Body on this forum, it's no more "big fish in a little pond" for the rest of us. For those who don't know, Mr. P-Body is a wealth of valuable information pertaining to Pontiacs. He's quite active on the "other" forum(s). Welcome to the "little tight knit" Pontiac forum!!!
 

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Have any of you guys used 'the right stuff' gasket sealer made by Permatex/loctite? It is similar to the sealer that GM uses during assembly but much better. I was a die-hard user of the ultra series sealers until this product came along. We first used it to mate Aluminum intakes to iron blocks. We found that if we wiped both surfaces with brake clean before assembly when we disassembled the engine the sealer was attached to both surfaces. As most of us know that is not usually what we see.
 
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