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I have a strange lack of interest in my GTO after finishing it's return to glory. I've owned it since '79, driven it regularly till '07 when I took it apart to make it a real head turner. It's a numbers matching car with AC, power windows, PS/PB, and more. All GM metal except the quarters. The guy who painted it did a stellar job. The car looks stunning. runs great. I just don't seem to desire it that much. Since it's been done, I probably have 200 miles on it. I love the way it looks, every time I see it in my garage I find myself staring at it, it's so nice. I wonder about selling it, but don't think I could ever do it, unless I had health issues, which I don't. I know this sounds like a therapy session, but has anybody else had a similar situation? I also know the guy with his car in a million pieces will think I'm a nut case, as the car is complete. It's in storage for the winter, maybe in May I'll feel different. I hope so anyway.
 

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The Conquest is greater than the victory, no?

When you fire that bad boy up in spring, it will all change.

I go through the same thing often.Then I fire up the sled and lay down some rubber, and its on.

Winter sucks.Spring is coming.You will be fine , as I will be too.
 

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Just drive it more, don’t baby it. Sometimes guys get all focused on what it is worth, and don’t want miles to add up or minor scratches. Understand if you enjoy the show circuit and are going for wins.

I like to say if you want an investment get a mutual fund, if you want some fun get an old hot rod and drive it,......use it more, you will like it more.

guarantee it!
 

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I agree with Maingoat68, Latech and lemans guy. I just finished rebuilding the motor and adding 4 wheel disc brakes on my 67... and boy, was it was a tiring process. But got a sunny 50 degree day here in New Mexico, and it felt good to be back in the saddle again. Spring will soon be here and ya maybe you wont drive it as much as expected...but when you do it will be a nice get away from the norm. Winter has a way of making you feel blah anyway. It does me anyway, I am a outside guy. hang in there.
 

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It's an age thing. The outlook on life in general simply changes. The vision of completing and getting the car to a finished state is what drove you - it was a combination of excitement and determination. Now its done - excitement and that determined drive to get there is no longer. It would be the same as if you simply went out and purchased the same car in the same condition it is now - turn key and drive. The feeling just isn't the same. You drive it around and who really notices? Younger people could care less. Older people who had these cars aren't out driving. The car probably see more garage time than road time due to the long winters.

So that leaves you with car shows and cruise-ins if you have them nearby or are willing to pack up and make the long drive to a bigger show. These can be a hassle, and somewhat boring if all you plan to do is park the car and sit next to it in a lounge chair, get wore out under the sun, and have to drive home.

So it tells me you are best suited for the work put into the rebuild rather than driving the finished product. But, as we get older, some of the drive to rebuild and put time & energy into such a project seems to dim - it becomes more like a job rather than the fun it used to be. And then you question yourself as if "do I really need to buy "this" and do I really need to spend "that" kind of money? And, there are so many things going on in our lives that "other things" seem to take away both out time and energy.

You would almost think you are depressed, but you also know you are not. As you mature and see the world far more different than when you saw it in your youth, you get frustrated and even disgusted with the direction things are going - you measure "now" with the past as memories take you down that path all too often. Your mood is not happy, but not sad - maybe it is more like a longing for what used to be. You become more cynical than optimistic, and feel you are surrounded by idiots because they are, and you know there is nothing you can do to effect a change. There is no respect anymore, no courtesy, no politeness, and people seem stressed, unemotional, empty, and dead inside. You see the younger generation who don't want to work and when they do, they only want to make just enough to get by with many still living with parents. They have no drive or commitment to anything, are lazy, and see life as a computer game to be played on with all the I-phones, Smart phones, Apps, Smart TV, Alexia, debit cards, ordering groceries, food, "stuff" online and having it delivered to your house so you don't have to interact with other humans. Technology is great, but it will be our downfall.

And the biggest problem I see........too many don't really want to be Americans anymore as there is no loyalty to it - "I have my rights" and then you pick whatever group you want who uses this as their crutch to destroy our American values, morals, and ethics.

Need I go on? LOL Here is what I do. Do not watch any News programs and do not read any newspapers. You can't do a thing about it anyway and you are not in control of any of it, so why let it frustrate and upset you? Minimize any conversations about politics or religion - I won't get sucked in to these conversations, I just walk away, because any conversation is merely opinion and in today's information network most of it is lies and disinformation having an agenda behind it.
I find those things I label as "safe" ie, doesn't have the potential to frustrate me or piss me off. I have a number of hobbies that fill the bill - to include tinkering with my cars. I am also single so I don't have to deal with ANY drama that females & family seem to like to engage in. I have my favorite TV channels and DVD's I can watch if I feel like it. I sometimes spend time listening to my vinyl records - Jan & Dean, Beach Boys, the early 60's right on through to Rock & Roll (Not really sure what they call today's crap as it isn't R&R, it's more whimpy with guys singing like their panties are choking off their nads to get that girlie voice). Go to mall, grab a bite to eat, hit the book stores and check out the car magazines. Yep, I do things I enjoy and won't even involve myself in anything that looks like it is going to be like stepping in a pile of poop and I can't scrape it off. Sometimes it is just great to stay on the couch all day and just sleep and let the day go by - watching John Wayne or Humphrey Bogart.

So, there is nothing wrong with you. You may just have to approach life differently and find a new perspective that may blot out the outside world. Sometimes I get naked and run around my house just to shame all the local males who have tiny tools and make their wives drool. Nothing funnier than some guy holding his hands over his wife's eyes so she can't look and compare - with him yelling for me to put my damn leopard thong back on. You just have to know how to get back at the world and not take it, or yourself so seriously. I have more years behind me than in front of me, so I'm going to have fun with my time. LOL My motto is "FTW"
 

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You summed up a large part of my life as it is now, PJ.
I'm still working because I don't have the hobbies of my youth and don't really know what else to do with my time.
I am where I longed to be for so long, and now that I'm here it's tough to enjoy it for some stupid reason.
Good to see someone else has a similar perspective.
 

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You summed up a large part of my life as it is now, PJ.
I'm still working because I don't have the hobbies of my youth and don't really know what else to do with my time.
I am where I longed to be for so long, and now that I'm here it's tough to enjoy it for some stupid reason.
Good to see someone else has a similar perspective.
LOL, there are many who feel the same way, they just don't talk about it. The key to enjoying life is really to find purpose. If you don't see any purpose in your life, then what good is it other than just biding your time? People die early or find their health failing if they don't have this as perhaps their job was all they lived for and was their purpose. Finding purpose also has to include finding that joy that sparks you to engage in that purpose.

The old saying it, "It's not the destination, but the journey." Ya, OK, I get it. But sometimes the journey wears you down before you reach the destination and then you don't give a crap one way or the other about the destination any more. Our cars/projects can be like this. The cars in our youth were an extension of our personalities. It blended in with our macho self's, our bad-ass self's, our cool self's, our hormones, our adrenaline, and most of all...........our ego's because owning whatever car we had - we were a somebody in our own minds. So that tire squealing, engine screaming, bang-shifting, Saturday night racer was a means of defining who we were ........not only to ourselves, but to our buddies, to those strangers who would challenge us for a race, and sometimes even the law. Owning, working on, and driving our cars was a piece of the character we saw ourselves as. Many of our cars were not pretty. They were beat up, torn up, wore out, and needed to be worked on and its why we had them.......but they were fast and that was what really mattered, and we tried to make them faster not really knowing the specifics of what we did, we just knew if you threw on "that" Holley, or "that" intake, or "those" headers, and "that" tire that it'll go faster because our buddies told us so or had a car with "that" which could outrun "Mike's" car and that was all we needed to know. We did not have the information network we have now other than magazines on the news stand, and the word of others who had modified their car to go faster. It was a form of innocence as basic as it was at times.........but it was FUN and got the adrenaline pumping.

Today, it seems it is more about production numbers and options, the rarity of the car, restoring to differing levels, dumping huge dollars into the car, having the "best" engine builder assemble our engine and brag about it and a 5-year loan to pay it off. The car scene has gotten too scientific - head flow CFM's, cam specs, roller lifters/cams, fuel injection/throttle bodies, blueprinting to a fault, OD transmission, electronic dashboards, coil over suspension, 4-wheel disc brakes, and 17-18" wheels. Of course there is a certain amount of worry and fear should we not get it right or didn't spend enough to achieve what we wanted so we have the huge horsepower/10-second bragging rights. This is NOT fun.........it is pressure. Then when it's all done, you worry. What's that noise? How come the car is doing that? How do I.......? Is this the way this goes? Should it sound like that? Etc., Etc..

So over time the joy falls off of ownership. If you put a lot of miles on the car and really enjoy it, you are going to wear out your engine and other mechanical parts, the seats may get dirty, someone might put a scratch or door ding on the car, and all the hard work and money that you put into the car depreciates when in fact you built the car to appreciate just like your stock portfolio. So it's a bitter- sweet form of ownership - damned if you do, damned if you don't. I say it's only a car. Drive it like you mean it and give yourself permission to be young again. You can always rebuilt it, fix it, or give it a make over. Throw its value right out the window or you will never enjoy the car as it was meant to be. The car is supposed to give you joy and be FUN, even if you do get the occasional ticket. Invest in a few stocks in Goodyear and make sure they do well by burning through a few sets of tires. Make the purpose of owning your car known to others by bringing back some of the history that these cars made - it wasn't about show, it was about speed and horsepower, King of the Road.

And then minimize your contact with the outside world - a little isolation does the mind & soul good. Be a little selfish and find things you want to do. If you don't have a hobby, find one. If you enjoy cars, build another one. I like Rat Rods and Hot Rods. These can be somewhat inexpensive when done right. It incorporates a vision of what you see the car as - which gives purpose to the build and purpose to you. Who cars if you ever even finish the car? You do it for the fun of it, the dream, the hope of what it could be, and the scrounging for cheap parts at the Pull-A-Part or swap meet that fit the bill, just as we did when we were kids because we had no money. I think the T-bucket is one of the cheapest builds and they make all kinds of parts if you want to go kit form. Old school small block Chevy costs nothing to rebuild as does a simple powerglide. White wall tires like the 1960's or wide meats like the 1970's. Lot of different looks can be achieved. Saw one at a car show with a straight 6-cyl Chevy. Very basic, inexpensive, different, but it was cool and had a lot of people looking. And when its done, you can most lilely sell it at a profit and not have to hope someone is willing to pay you 40-50K because that's what you have in it like a GTO restoration.

Life sucks, period, but it is not until you get older that you get it. Gone are the rose colored glasses. It boils down to how are you going to spend what time you have left on this earth? Are you going to cave in and let the outside world make you feel crappy, or are you going to take it upon yourself to make yourself feel.............happy? Its really your choice and not someone else's if you are really in control of who you are and aren't controlled by everyone/everything else.

(y)
 

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"PontiacJim, post: 893747, member: 21985"]


.
The cars in our youth were an extension of our personalities. It blended in with our macho self's, our bad-ass self's, our cool self's, our hormones, our adrenaline, and most of all...........our ego's because owning whatever car we had - we were a somebody in our own minds. So that tire squealing, engine screaming, bang-shifting, Saturday night racer was a means of defining who we were ........not only to ourselves, but to our buddies, to those strangers who would challenge us for a race, and sometimes even the law. Owning, working on, and driving our cars was a piece of the character we saw ourselves as. Many of our cars were not pretty. They were beat up, torn up, wore out, and needed to be worked on and its why we had them.......but they were fast and that was what really mattered, and we tried to make them faster not really knowing the specifics of what we did, we just knew if you threw on "that" Holley, or "that" intake, or "those" headers, and "that" tire that it'll go faster because our buddies told us so or had a car with "that" which could outrun "Mike's" car and that was all we needed to know. We did not have the information network we have now other than magazines on the news stand, and the word of others who had modified their car to go faster. It was a form of innocence as basic as it was at times.........but it was FUN and got the adrenaline pumping.
You nailed this, too. Having the fastest car in high school doesn't really matter any more does it?
Thanks for the introspect, bud.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
PJ hit on a good reality trip here. I'm at the beginning of the 60s decade of my life, and maybe the lost car lust has something to do with that. I'm going down an unfamiliar road, and it's a bit scary. Still working 50+ hours a week, at a job I enjoy, but there are a lot of things to think about in regards to the future. ralph7's words in post #6 ring a bit true also. Maybe I'm scared to damage the car in any way, there are a lot of idiots out there. Maybe I really don't want to own it anymore. Maybe I need to slow down a bit and try to enjoy the time off that I have, and fit the GTO into that. I do have a 56 pickup that needs to be worked on, maybe in the spring, I can play with that a bit, and unwind in the goat. When summer comes, if I still don't feel the need to drive it, I could put a price on it, to test the market, and see where that takes me. Maybe Clint Eastwood said it best "get busy living, or get busy dying"
 

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Not trying to beat this to death, or over analyze, but another thing to consider for us "seasoned" guys is that your physiology changes as you get older. Your bodies' internal workings are not what they were in our youth, my definition of youth is under 45 as it seemed to me that is when you begin to exit your "prime."

Your body does not synthesize the foods we consume as well as it did when our innards were in top shape. You may not be getting the vitamins & minerals needed to maintain a healthy you. I am not a health nut by any means, but I do have my regiment of vitamins, minerals, and herb supplements. I am consciously aware of what I eat and how much in an effort to remain healthy and keep my weight in check. If you are lacking in some nutritional needs or even have too much of something, it can throw your body off, as well as your brain and its processes. So you could feel unwell, edgy, dull, have no energy, or just plain feel crappy and can't explain why........but it could be that your system just isn't getting enough of a specific vitamin or mineral, or has too much of it, and either way throwing off how you feel.

As we age, it is also important to stay hydrated. I never had a problem with this and didn't really drink much fluids when I was younger, but now older, I have to make sure I get enough liquids or I will begin to feel run down. Staying hydrated is very important as it also help keep those old joints lubricated, kidneys flushing, and keeps the blood at a level that aids in the transmission of oxygen in & carbon dioxide out. My line of thinking is that when your blood gets thicker it doesn't seem to take in or transfer oxygen from your lungs as well. I don't have asthma, but I do know when I don't get enough liquids that I find I am more labored in breathing and feel a little short of breath. Down some water, and in short time all my symptoms are gone. So as your blood thickens, the body and its organs have to work harder.

Exercise is important. Not anything crazy or needing to go to the gym, but just simple basics. I hate exercise. I have a job where I don't get a lot of physical work. What I find is that my muscles get weak (which they will do anyway as we get older - lose muscle mass) and I feel worse. You try and do some work around the house, pull off a front bumper on your car, walk up a flight of stairs, or many of the things you had absolutely no problem doing all day long when you were younger......and now you can't and your body reacts like you are a 10-pack a day smoker with black lung - you suck in hard to catch your breath and your heart is pounding right out of your chest and you gotta stop to let your body calm down. Being out of shape and trying to do something strenuous that you could have easily done in your youth can put you right into cardiac arrest or even a stroke as the rise in blood pressure pops a vein in your brain.

I simply work out with some free weights while I watch TV. I have a 25 lb dumbell I curl for a few sets, hand grip squeeze, 1 lb hand weights, and I have a weight bench I like to use to do presses using about 65 lbs. It is not to bulk up or get stronger, but to tone muscles and keep them in a somewhat usable shape when I need them. It also helps with the heart & breathing. I think I might spend 20 minutes and I don't always do this every day. But I have learned that if I do not do it, my muscles get "mushy", I begin to feel tired and lose my energy level, and feel crappy about life in general. I work out a little, my mood improves greatly, and my energy level comes back up.

I also do some stretching exercises for my legs. If not, muscles will atrophy as well as your tendons & ligaments. Then you feel stiffer, the atrophy is in essence the tightening and shrinking of them and next thing you know you have back problems and you find it stiff to walk, or even move. When I forget to do my stretches for any length of time......my lower back pitches a fit. Right away I know what it is and what I have not been doing. Start my stretching again and in short order my back pains go away. Leg cramps also go away if you ever have those.

Protein intake is important - not enough and you can feel run down. I am not a big meat eater and like my vegetables & salads more. So I make sure I do eat an occasional hamburger or when I make soups, I add lean ground hamburger. I also use Whey powder which is more associated with weight lifters as they require more protein to build muscles and bulk up. Because I know I don't get a lot of protein, using the Whey powder is a suppliment for me. I put a couple table spoons of it on my boring granola cereal like I would sugar to add flavor, or put 1 scoop of it in a mixing cup and bring to work where I add water, shake, and drink. The stuff does not stir well at all and will clump up, so use a blender or a mixing cup you can shake the crap out of. Sometimes I will add a cup of coffe to it and get my protein and caffeine all in the same drink - which perks me up and gives me a shot of energy at work. LOL It comes in different flavors. I will also grab one of those beef jerky snacks as they are a good quick source of protein. I get one that has 23 grams of protein when I start to feel run down at work because I put off too long having anything to eat or drink as I don't have any "normal" lunch period like many, I have to take it when I can.

So in addition to how our perspectives change and can make us feel "blah", our nutritional needs also change and sometimes need to be looked into or addressed as they too can make us feel "blah.". A doctor can do blood work and tell you exactly what is in your blood and whether you may be short on some nutrients or have too much of another. Hydration is important as we get older. You seem to get dehydrated easier & faster as you get older and really don't know it until the exahaustion hits you, especially when you are all wrapped up in your project build when summer rolls around. And make sure you get enough protein and try to do some exercise.
 

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I too have been there - with three teenagers in the house and work busy, it gets difficult to enjoy the fruits of the labor invested in restoring. While I still have body and paint to accomplish some day (read the three teenagers, college coming) - I am proud that I've completed the mechanical resto part. In terms of the "lack of interest"? LeMans guy said it right. Wait for weather, go to a good traffic light with long run out, when the light hits dump the clutch hard and row the gears. that ALWAYS works for me. Every single time. that sound, the punch of your body into the seat and the chirp of tires never disappoints me. Good Luck!
 

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Oh My God. You guys verbalized things so well. I'm 73 and had my 67 "Tribute" or "Clone" or whatever you choose to call my convertible, finished a couple years ago with a lot of "modern" upgrades, but it still looks stock. I'm now 73 and facing retirement. My biggest concern is what will I do with my time and what can I do to feel I have a purpose.

Living in the Chicago area in the winter doesn't help any. Guess I'll just have to wait til spring to see I can get the adreniline flowing again.
 

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mainegoat68,
From the looks of your avatar, I have a similar Verduro Green '68 coupe, and I understand some of your reluctance. my '68 is within a month of coming back to me after a body off restoration, and I can hardly contain myself. As a high schooler 50 years ago, dreaming and drawing pictures of that ole' goat kept me awake in class for three years. But, I've had other incredible cars that I simply stopped driving because they were such a pain in the rear. I have owned a 1972 De Tomaso Pantera for about 18 years, but I literally was never driving it. Some years I didn't put 5 miles on it. And in 2013 when I bought a 2010 5.0L Jaguar XKR with about 600hp, I didn't have to worry how warm it was outside (Panteras like to overheat), or whether or not I would make it home on a drive of any length, getting it started (which never ever happened without me pulling the air cleaner and dumping gas into the carb) or go without a functioning air conditioner, or put up with a car that was much less quick than my Jag, so I stopped driving it altogether. About 6 years ago, I told myself I was either going to sell it or make it a car that I wanted to drive not have the chore of driving. That started with changing to EFI, followed by an all new luxurious leather interior, a 500+hp engine transplant, flush windshield glass, cooling and exhaust upgrades, new paint, and now I try and drive it every weekend. I put excitement back into owning and driving it. Find some drives or cruise night drives with other owners and enjoy getting together with them showing off your beauty. And if that doesn't do it for you, then go after something that does.
133011
 

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I have come to find it’s the journey more so then the destination. I have cycled through a number of projects, starting with a basket cases and finishing with an 11 second daily driver a few times. The research, the creative accounting for parts acquisitions, THE ACTUAL HANDS ON WRENCHING, the comradery of friends helping and going on multi state parts journeys, the excitement of the first riders or trips down the strip…..

Then the projects all over and you have to go out of your way to find places to drive to, that are “secure” to park in etc etc……
Then its time for another project, and this time it’s the last – I promise!!!

Current project....
133017
 

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This is a great thread. I agree with all that I have read and think it is important to keep things in perspective, which is what y'all seem to be trying to do. This "post restoration depression" is a real phenomenon, even when younger. When I was 19, I finished my 67 LeMans project and it was "perfect." It was so beautiful that I was terrified to drive it. But it was my daily driver and I had no other option. One rainy day and four wheel drum brakes were a nightmare come true for me as I accidentally destroyed that car, a telephone pole, and a traffic light. Thankfully, nobody was injured.
I am older now with many children, but I'm still trying to build the "fastest car in the high school." Just me and my family will know about it and my high school peers will mostly never care or know that I finally won the pissing contest. Still, I'm passing on some legacy to the next generation; hopefully - hard work, don't be scared to get your hands dirty, stuff breaks and this is how you can fix it,etc. Plus I tell a lot of stories as we work on the GTO together and it strengthens us as a family. That is one strong point of this forum, we are sort of "family" in the context of our common interest in these historic hot rods.
 

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I have a strange lack of interest in my GTO after finishing it's return to glory. I've owned it since '79, driven it regularly till '07 when I took it apart to make it a real head turner. It's a numbers matching car with AC, power windows, PS/PB, and more. All GM metal except the quarters. The guy who painted it did a stellar job. The car looks stunning. runs great. I just don't seem to desire it that much. Since it's been done, I probably have 200 miles on it. I love the way it looks, every time I see it in my garage I find myself staring at it, it's so nice. I wonder about selling it, but don't think I could ever do it, unless I had health issues, which I don't. I know this sounds like a therapy session, but has anybody else had a similar situation? I also know the guy with his car in a million pieces will think I'm a nut case, as the car is complete. It's in storage for the winter, maybe in May I'll feel different. I hope so anyway.
I think you have the same problem as I did. The fun for me was the restoration. I drive it but I don’t put on a 1000 miles a year
 

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I'm a bit late to the party here but I'll share my 2 cents anyway. I don't think this is unique to older guys (60+). I'm only in my mid 40's and I have the same issues from time to time. I like to call it "car guy ADD". Guys who like to work on cars feel let down when the project is done because there is a hole that was filled with either working on the car or planning on projects for the car. When the project is done, the hole is emptied out. My LeMans has been pretty well sorted for the last few years. This year I found myself more into an early 90's Toyota that I bought for the 4cyl street stock class at my local short track. I spent the late summer and early fall learning how to weld in a roll cage while the LeMans sat unused.

I took the LeMans out for a ride about a month ago before winter set in and an amazing thing happened. One of the exhaust hangers (welded to the pipe) broke off so now I have the winter to plan an exhaust project. My interest has been rekindled!

So maybe the solution to your problem is another project. It does not have to be as high dollar as your GTO. I picked up the Toyota for under $500 because it had a bad clutch and the body was rough. Really cheep for a car with 105K on the clock.
 
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