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The GTO is the first RWD car I have owned. I had a GTP before this and did pretty well when it came to warming tires up and launching. My question is how do I hold the GTO in place at the track to stay in the water box to properly warm the drag radials. Also how long of a burn out is optimal for warming them up? I have 275 nitto 555's what pressure do you guys run at the track.

Thanks
Nick
 

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Put a line lock on it, that's a solenoid that locks the front brakes on so you can do a burn out without hurting the back brakes. You can just hold the brakes on and burn em, but that hurts the rear brakes. In my Vette I just light em up and let it walk out of the water box, but I'm not on DR's.
 

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I avoid the box... but thats with street tires.
 

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I do things a bit different depending on A4 or M6.

Tire pressures.

I walk the track and feel the prep on it before racing starts. If it isn't very good prep I lower the pressure to 20-22 on DR's. If it's good prep I keep the pressure around 24. I play with it too, lowering it and seeing what happens and raising it nd seeing what happens. That is the same for A4 or M6, the rest is different.


M6

Drive around the box and back into it.

Get your tires wet in the box and pull a foot forward where it's still wet but you aren't in the box.

Put it in second with the T/C off and take it up to 3500 or so and come off the clutch and put your foot on the brakes. As mentioned this is hard on your back brakes, but typically they last forever anyhow.

Let the car spin for at least 2 seconds at around 3500 rpms or so and then slowly ease off the brakes keep your foot steady on the throttle. The rpms will start to drop then it will hook and you hit the clutch.

You need at least 2 seconds of spin to get any heat into the tires and some guys put 3-5 seconds as the right amount of time. Play with it. Different driving techniques like different things.

A4

Pull around the box and back in.

Get the tires wet and pull a foot out of the box.

Put one foot on the brake and one on the gas. Ease the throttle till the tires spin. start out slow and ease the throttle down to make it spin faster till you have about 3 seconds of spining.

Ease up on the brakes and on the gas till it hooks up, then stop the car.

DR's like to have heat in them from what I found. If you just do a clean off spin with DR's you will never use their full potential.
 

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All the videos I've seen, guys sit and spin them, like Fergyflyer mentioned, but usually the guys who hook the best get them smoking for a while then let off the brake. If done right they should grab as soon as you're off the brake. Nothing says you can't do another burnout.
 

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I subscribed to this thread as well to learn more about this.

You guys should disclose your 60fts to give reference points and support your techniques.

I do things a bit different depending on A4 or M6.

Tire pressures.

I walk the track and feel the prep on it before racing starts. If it isn't very good prep I lower the pressure to 20-22 on DR's. If it's good prep I keep the pressure around 24. I play with it too, lowering it and seeing what happens and raising it nd seeing what happens. That is the same for A4 or M6, the rest is different.


M6

Drive around the box and back into it.

Get your tires wet in the box and pull a foot forward where it's still wet but you aren't in the box.

Put it in second with the T/C off and take it up to 3500 or so and come off the clutch and put your foot on the brakes. As mentioned this is hard on your back brakes, but typically they last forever anyhow.

Let the car spin for at least 2 seconds at around 3500 rpms or so and then slowly ease off the brakes keep your foot steady on the throttle. The rpms will start to drop then it will hook and you hit the clutch.

You need at least 2 seconds of spin to get any heat into the tires and some guys put 3-5 seconds as the right amount of time. Play with it. Different driving techniques like different things.

A4

Pull around the box and back in.

Get the tires wet and pull a foot out of the box.

Put one foot on the brake and one on the gas. Ease the throttle till the tires spin. start out slow and ease the throttle down to make it spin faster till you have about 3 seconds of spining.

Ease up on the brakes and on the gas till it hooks up, then stop the car.

DR's like to have heat in them from what I found. If you just do a clean off spin with DR's you will never use their full potential.
No wonder you have a hard time with the driver mod and prep excuses that I've offered.

At Sears Point, backing into the water box is forbidden and walking the track is absolutely unheard of.

Also, "we" only get 3 runs before going to brackets. That is over a 2 hour period and a 300 car count.

Most guys lower the tire pressure on their 20" non-DR street tires well below 30psi with disasterous results not knowing any better.
 

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At Sears Point, backing into the water box is forbidden and walking the track is absolutely unheard of.

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Really? Backing into the water box is common around here. Usally you can tell the track prep by watching other folks walk on the track and how other cars respond out the hole.
 

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My 60 foot's with the above techniques.

01-02 F-Body with 245 width street tires 1.98-2.05
01-02 F-Body with 255 width DR's 1.84-1.91

02-03 C5 Z06 285 width street tires 1.88-1.95
02-03 C5 Z06 with 305 width ET streets 1.61 :eek: is my best. Usually 1.67-1.71

05-06 C6 with runflat street tires 1.98-2.08. I think they were 275 or 285 width.

I never had the GTO on DR's. On the stock street tires it was a high 1.9 to low 2.0. I think my best was a 1.96.

You have to be at least a half hour early to walk the track. I usually take a group with me that are new and give them tips and a walk through. The tracks usually tell people to come and see me when I'm there, if the person is new to drag racing, for a walk through of what they should and shouldn't do. I make it a habit to walk the track each time I'm there and get myself into the proper mental frame of mind.

As with any sport, the mental part of drag racing is the key to success.
 

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Put a line lock on it, that's a solenoid that locks the front brakes on so you can do a burn out without hurting the back brakes. You can just hold the brakes on and burn em, but that hurts the rear brakes. In my Vette I just light em up and let it walk out of the water box, but I'm not on DR's.
The line lock is a good sugestion

A huge burnout only waists the tires. You only need to get some heat in them to make them sticky.
I agree. 3 to 5 seconds should be plenty for a burnout. As soon as the smoke starts to roll up you should be good. Unless the slicks or DRs are new than a longer burn out is a good idea to remove the factory oils.
 

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Really? Backing into the water box is common around here. Usally you can tell the track prep by watching other folks walk on the track and how other cars respond out the hole.
Backing into the box is a violation of the track rule for whatever reason - maybe safety?

No one other than the workers walk the track before racing, at least as early as I've arrived there.

How cars respond is a valid point - if you know the tires they are using and if the psi is set right. Of course, watching the ricer "sport street" class tells you absolutely nothing except how bad they are at driving/launching/RTs/shifting.... :lol:
 

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Backing into the box is a violation of the track rule for whatever reason - maybe safety?

No one other than the workers walk the track before racing, at least as early as I've arrived there.

How cars respond is a valid point - if you know the tires they are using and if the psi is set right. Of course, watching the ricer "sport street" class tells you absolutely nothing except how bad they are at driving/launching/RTs/shifting.... :lol:
I watch reaction times to see if a driver is experienced or not. If I cut anything worse than a .100 I'm disapointed. I had three in a row last week that were under .010.

If someone is experienced and they go to the track alot they will cut good lights. They know the rollout time on their car and the way it's going to react.

I had a NHRA guy give me a hard time once. I pulled into the staging lanes for my first run. I purposefully waited till all the street cars had run. There was only about 30 there and no one had pulled into the lane yet after their first pass.

I pulled down and he motions for me to go. I indicated that I wasn't ready, no helmet on. He said go and go now or leave the track. I was pissed. There wasn't even a car for me to run against. So I hurried up and put my helmet on and pulled around the box. I went to back in and noticed he was fairly close behind me with his back turned.

Well I left the car in to water box, instead of pulling out of it, to do my burnout and nailed it. It shot a nice rooster tail of water onto this guy and drenched him. I got up to the line and the starter said don't do a burnout in the water box again or they would kick me out. I told him I was sorry, but I didn't want to run and the guy at the lanes forced me too so I was hurrying and made a mistake.

I then ran a nice slow 18 second 1/4 by getting the car up to 70 and setting the cruise.
 
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