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I have '65 GTO with a 3:55 posi rearend and want to know how to remove the axles. I am used to the Chevy posi units that have C-clips but this one is got me stumped. Thanks
 

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I have '65 GTO with a 3:55 posi rearend and want to know how to remove the axles. I am used to the Chevy posi units that have C-clips but this one is got me stumped. Thanks
My past experience was sometimes after removing the plate, the axle would just come out without any effort. Other times, I had to install an old wheel and just beat on the rim/tire until it came out. No rhyme or reason.
 

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I have a 67 GTO. Mine you remove 4 bolts behind each of the brake drum assemblies. The bolts hold the assembly and a retaining plate in place. once removed the axles slide out. Try to pull straight out and support it so you don't damage the seals. There was nothing in the pumpkin holding them in like the C clips.
 

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No C clips on a Pontiac. Just remove the 4 bolts as stated, and pull it out. Sometimes you have to reverse the drum and use it as a slide hammer....works fine.
 

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:agree
That's correct: there is even a socket hole in the axle wheel flange so you can stick a 9/16" socket and extension through the flange to pull the nuts off the retainer plate studs. Once you remove the 4 nuts, the entire axle with retainer plate slides out of the axle tube.

In some cases, you don't need to pull the nuts: If the axle bearing or bearing retaining collar fails on a Pontiac, the entire axle, with brake drum and wheel attached, slides right out of the axle completely on its own, resulting in complete brake failure and loss of directional control of the vehicle. This is particularly interesting if you're driving at a high rate of speed in a canyon in the Rocky Mountains.

Lars
Rocky Mountains
 

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LOL!! "This is particularly interesting if you're driving at a high rate of speed in a canyon in the Rocky Mountains"......Or, if you're fully loaded and packed for a week long vacation, and you're coming down a steep, winding road a few miles from home, and you see your entire left rear wheel and tire riding outside of the wheel well like a gigantic training wheel!!
 
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