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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi, I'm new here. Rebuilding the inner filler panel....I have a question about the reveal molding in the normal problem area on these GTO's. The rear window. It is severely rotted out. My question is how do you repair the reveal molding nail head on the sheet metel. How does one reattach the molding clips with no nail head things. I have found post on repairing the rest of it just not the nail head. Is there a modern way of attaching the glass and molding?
 

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Pop rivets? Sheet metal screws? Can't answer you with any experience with these, but that is what I think I would do. I would also make sure I put some sealant on the end of whatever fastener I used so water would not get down past the fastener/drilled hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'd like to TIG them if they are available. I mean they are on many many cars but I still cant find a place to buy them. I might just have to use screws. How un original
 

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Had the same problem when I replaced the passenger side quarter on my 69. The replacement panel had no trim rivets.

You don't want to use screws, or anything that puts a hole in the panel because that's just giving rust a head start. I used a stud welder and a head for attaching trim rivets.
Something like this:
Stud Welder Trim Rivet Tip
Stud Welder Trim Rivets bag/500


Bear
 

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Putting a dab of sealant on the end of a screw works real well at preventing rot in the future. The car will never see 40 hrs in the parking lot, salt, mud, etc, will it? It most likely will not sit outdoors 24/7 in an apartment complex either, right? What's the worry? Frankly, in an area that can never be seen or judged, AND where I have control over preventing deterioration in the future...make sense? All of this is assuming you dont have a stud welder or access to one. Sometimes it's better to pet the sweaty instead of sweat the petty. Just sayin...

A quick edit here, the real issue is making sure you get whatever you use properly aligned. If it's off you have either a gap that can't be corrected or some nice chips in your new paint. Both would suck...
 
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