Pontiac GTO Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know that's a relative question, relative to how badly someone want's that model or particular car. I have my 65 GTO Sport Coupe for sale on many of the usual publications and websites, including here on the Forum. It's been most interesting and frustrating that many people have a "offer number" in mind, regardless of the car's actual value or money invested in the restoration. I began my project this past January after retiring last December. It has been enjoyable project and I am very proud of the end result, while being equally shocked how much parts have gone up in price and the end cost of the restoration. Some have made offers based on other cars they have seen for sale without considering that they will have to spend thousands to tens of thousands of dollars in restoration cost to achieve a comparable level. I totally get that sometimes the "number" is just their budget, but know too that sometimes, at this price point, it's a game that some play just to see how much they can grind someone down. I know we all want the best value for our money and no one wants to overpay for anything, but this really hurts our hobby in the end. If everyone has to spend more money on their cars than it's worth, then how long can the preservation of classic cars last? The many classic car auctions have not helped our hobby either. How often have you seen a car that obviously had a complete restoration, often exceeding 100K, being sold for 30-40K? I saved a car that would have otherwise probably not been saved and am proud of keeping it alive for the next generation. None of my comments should be considered as complaining, but instead in observation. I totally get it's a competitive market, but have to ask "what's a car really worth?" I hate to sell my 65, but will be moving across the country soon and need to move it along to a new home. If you know of anyone in the market for a nicely restored GTO Sport Coupe, I would really appreciate your passing along my information. I totally get that this post is unconventional, but we live in unconventional times and we car guys and gals have to stick together to keep our hobby alive and inspire the next generation to do the same. I've updated "my garage" with recent photo's and details. Happy Thanksgiving to all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Unless you are in the restoration & resale business, you should NEVER expect to get back even close to the amount required to do a really nice restoration.

Only way to ever hope to do that is to find a REAL good deal, on a real rare, very desirable, model, that is in fairly good shape when you buy it, and be able to do all the work yourself. There use to be lots of those "barn find" super rare deals. But, those are mostly history now. Lots of people now know what old Musclecars are worth. So, super good deals are EXTREMELY rare, nowadays.

If you sell a not-super-rare car, not long after you do the restoration, you can expect to lose a lot. That's just the way it is.

But, there are a FEW guys who have plenty of money & don't really care what it costs. They'll buy, if it's what they want. I'd certainly be the same way, if I had plenty. The question is: Can you find one of those rich guys who's lookin for exactly what you have ?

Hey, it's close to Christmas. So, some rich guy might buy it for his son, or dad. Don't think most grandchildren would even want a car that old, nowadays. Times have changed. I assume the average owner age of '74 & older model GTO's, is probably well above 50. May even be above 60, now. Lots of guys don't have enuff extra cash to buy one, 'til their kids are out of college & have families of their own.

Due to all these facts, unless the car is one of the super-rare models, that rich collectors would want, the price of regular non-collector GTO's might actually be going down. Haven't seen any statistics on it lately. Maybe others here have. Can't really tell by just looking up prices of cars currently for sale, since most of those prices are just fishing bait. Lots of guys will sell for the really high price they are asking, IF they can find anybody with enuff money who is willing to give that inflated asking price. Just as an example: Lots of guys would be happy to sell their $30k car for their $68,500 asking price, if somebody was willing to pay that much.

A sale only requires 2 people--a seller, with something to sell, & a buyer with enuff money to buy it & the willingness to pay the selling price.

I've bought old Pontiac parts that nobody else seemed to want, at the time. But, to me, the part or parts were worth the asking price.

Here are a few sites listing GTO's. Many times, the same cars will be listed on lots of sites.

https://www.autotempest.com/results?make=pontiac&model=gto&zip=71251&minyear=1965&maxyear=1965&bodystyle=coupe

https://classics.autotrader.com/classic-cars-for-sale/1965-pontiac-gto-for-sale

https://classiccars.com/listings/find/1965/pontiac/gto

https://www.iseecars.com/used_cars-t5989-used-pontiac-firebird-for-sale#Location=71251&Radius=all&Make=Pontiac&Model=GTO&Year_min=1965&Year_max=1965&Condition=used&_t=a&maxResults=15&sort=BestMatch&sortOrder=desc&lfc_t0=MTU3NDQ3MDM4NjE0MQ==
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
Ah, welcome to the real world of car pricing. Yes, the cost to restore a car will seemingly always be far more than what you will get out of it unless it is that super rare and highly desirable 1of 50 or less.

The car shows and assorted high end auctions you see on TV only falsely pump up the enthusiasm to restore a car in hopes of big profits in the return. Not so. You restore a car because you want to. The value in the end is only what anyone is willing to pay - not what you think you should get for the car based on what you sunk into it or the labor you sweated over it.

Anyone can argue with me, but the prices of these cars went overinflated due in part to the generation who grew up with them and who always wanted "that car" but could not afford it, but had the liquid assets in later life and could afford to purchase or restore a car without nit picking about the price. Now that that generation is past their prime, these cars are being sold off and the next generation or so doesn't have the same reverence or connection to these cars because they were not of their generation - thus the LS transplants, OD transmissions, EFI, computer controls, coil overs, etc..

So now the value of these cars has dropped as has the interest. The guy looking to buy is looking for a "deal" where he can then modify the car to his personal tastes, so why pay 35K for a car that will see another 10K of mods and not be worth the 45K when that guy goes to sell it.

Add to this, who can work on them anymore? It's like finding a guy to set the valve lash on your Nash inline 6 cyl or pull the head off a straight 8 to do a valve job. So why buy a car "that old" when the owner can't work on it, and there is no local guy/shop in town who knows how to work on it, and when you do get someone to work on it, it costs a lot more and they can't just go to NAPA and get the parts, so the car might be down for awhile.

Just like most old cars from the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, 1950's, they will be modified and upgraded to make them repairable & serviceable with easier access to parts & labor. The only thing desirable will be the manufacturer's name and/or body style. How many restored 1932 Ford Coupes do you see running around, or restored '41 Willys, or......? You don't. This is already happening to our Pontiacs, the body will remain, but under the skin will be "new & improved." Original won't hold the value it used to as the next generation puts their vision on what the car should be, not what it is.

So if you really want to sell your car, what ever the highest offer is that you receive is the best offer you may get. You can sit on it and hold out, but I would not bet that it's value will increase as the next generation looks to the cars from "their era" that they grew up with as teenagers and young adults and could not afford, but now can.

This is the nature of old cars with their highs and lows - they don't stay high forever and can plummet quickly at great losses, just like a stock. :yesnod:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Have you looked up and compared your car and price with some others? I was looking on Ebay and your car easily hangs with those. Only thing Missing on yours is the Tri power. I always get asked if mine has tri. I respond that tri power was only up to 66. 67 came out with 400 4 barrel, then show them what that looks like, (below) and they leave satisfied. Love them or hate them tri power is a big selling point. Good luck RM
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for the input and links. Looks like I have it priced competitively with most and lower than others, so hopefully I can find the right buyer that always wanted a GTO or wants to replace the one they had "back in the day". Yes ideally, we build cars to keep and it cost what it cost. I can testify to that with my 69 Nova SS that I've owned for 48 years. Hopefully with this car, I will be able to find someone who appreciates the attention to detail and extensive list of new and rebuilt parts this classic has. Otherwise, guess I will have to keep it and move it across the country too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
Found an interesting story in the latest edition of Hagerty magazine which has merit to this post.

The millennium age group has targeted cars they see as desirable and/or collectable at a lower average price range of $23,000 as opposed the Gen X collectors whose average price range is $29,500.

The top 10 cars desired by the millennium group are:

[URL=https://www.gtoforum.com/usertag.php?do=list&action=hash&hash=1]#1 0[/URL] -1967-'69 Camaro
#9 - 1974-'82 Corvette
#8 - 1968-'79 VW Bug
#7 - 1973-'79 Ford F-Series Pick-up
#6 - 1968-'72 Chevelle
#5 - 1994-2000 Mustang
#4 - 1987-'93 Mustang
#3 - 1967-'72 Chevy C/K Pick-up
#2 - 1965-'66 Mustang
#1 - 1973-'87 Chevy C/K Pick-up

Other desirable cars include the Fast & Furious types, Honda, 1995-'99 BMW M3, 2004-'07 Subaru WRX STI, 1997-2001 Accura Integra, and 1989-'94 Nissan Skyline GT-R.

So my opinion is that the prices for the 1960's muscle cars will most likely see a decline not only due to the age bracket seeking cars from "their era," but because they are also not willing to pay the higher prices for them.

:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Jim and all, what I have found is that we Pontiac people are unique in our taste and desires, although the GTO has a mystique of its own. I think many of the "desired cars" are cars that non-car people, those who like the way a car looks but no idea of how to work on or restore, think they want. They soon find out that these cars do not handle nor ride like a modern car and the "shine wears off". I've owned 5 Corvettes and by far the most difficult to work on ( in the engine compartment at least, especially the radiator and cooling system) are some of the most difficult to work on, but granted, they do look good! We are all different and there is no right or wrong car buying decision. If it flips your switch, then go for it! I saw a really awesome 65 or 66 Grand Prix at a show recently that had the 4 speed and rally gauges including the Pontiac tachometer. It had to be a fairly rare car and was unrestored, original, California built and owned car. I just hope the next generation will appreciate these cars enough to keep them alive a bit longer.

Found an interesting story in the latest edition of Hagerty magazine which has merit to this post.

The millennium age group has targeted cars they see as desirable and/or collectable at a lower average price range of $23,000 as opposed the Gen X collectors whose average price range is $29,500.

The top 10 cars desired by the millennium group are:

[URL=https://www.gtoforum.com/usertag.php?do=list&action=hash&hash=1]#1 0[/URL] -1967-'69 Camaro
#9 - 1974-'82 Corvette
#8 - 1968-'79 VW Bug
#7 - 1973-'79 Ford F-Series Pick-up
#6 - 1968-'72 Chevelle
#5 - 1994-2000 Mustang
#4 - 1987-'93 Mustang
#3 - 1967-'72 Chevy C/K Pick-up
#2 - 1965-'66 Mustang
#1 - 1973-'87 Chevy C/K Pick-up

Other desirable cars include the Fast & Furious types, Honda, 1995-'99 BMW M3, 2004-'07 Subaru WRX STI, 1997-2001 Accura Integra, and 1989-'94 Nissan Skyline GT-R.

So my opinion is that the prices for the 1960's muscle cars will most likely see a decline not only due to the age bracket seeking cars from "their era," but because they are also not willing to pay the higher prices for them.

?
m, Yes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
It ain't just cars, that's for sure. I recently sold a collection of guns for the widow of a friend who died. Guy was a "gun guy" like me and I hated to see his wife get ripped off at a local gun shop. I agreed to sell the guns, about 60 of them, with the understanding that I would have my pick of about ten of them for 50% of market price. I have a federal firearms license, so I was able to sell/ship them online fairly easily through gunbroker. A lot of the same model of guns I was selling, many 100+ year-old Winchesters and various engraved and gold-inlay guns, were listed at crazy prices on gunbroker. You can go on there and also search "completed" auctions to see what they're actually selling for. Many of these guns were listed for a year or more at a crazy high reserve price or real high "starting bids" and hadn't sold for a very long time.

I started listing them with no reserve and people swooped in once they knew I was selling a collection with no reserve. I let the market determine the price. I was surprised at how low some of them sold for but I was equally surprised at how HIGH some of them went when the right person came along for the right gun.

Same goes for any other commodity. One of the guns was a modern-production, stainless-steel 9mm "Artillery Luger", made by Stoeger. My buddy had sent it out for some engraving and gold inlay. I wouldn't have paid $1,000.00 for it, but some physician bought it for $4,000.00! I guess he just had to have it! Maybe he thought it belonged to Hitler. The gun I really thought would command a high price was an original "Red Nine" Mauser pistol. All original in beautiful shape. Only went for $2,600.00. Somebody got a deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
In Hemming s Muscle Machines magazine they report on the outcome of recent auctions. In the January 2020 edition they covered the Las Vegas and some other auctions late last year. I have never seen as many "not sold" as in this edition. Some that did sell were way below the "average" price. Perhaps it's the time of year or maybe the car values are just in free-fall. Yes it makes sense that you would spend the money to build, resto-mod or restore a car if you plan on keeping it, but even that is questionable now when you can buy a car already built that someone else has lost their shirt on for a fraction of what it would cost you to build one. The reproduction part prices are out of sight and with many of them made overseas, we all know that cost a fraction of what the aftermarket is selling them for and is largely a rip-off. Used, good quality are even more $. It's kind of like the housing market here in California where most people can no longer afford to buy a starter home, as many now sell for well over one-million dollars for a fixer. It just does not make financial sense to restore a car any longer and that's a real shame for our hobby as many cars that can be restored will just continue to rot. I attended the Pomona swap meet and car show yesterday and as always, there were many project cars for sale. Where I once saw promise for a nice ride, I now only see having to spend 80 to 100 grand to build a $30,000 car.
My brother-in-law contacted Kindig in Salt Lake about restoring his Mustang, nothing too radical, just a new engine, paint, interior and was told that their builds "start" at $350K and they are booked up through 2024! It's amazing to me that there are that many people with that much disposable income to keep all these custom shops in business. It also reflects a shift in the market where the people who own these cars are (mostly) not really car people. That's not to say they don't like cars, but many probably can't do much more than open the hood. Good for them I guess. I will always be a "car-guy" and enjoy the hobby as long as I can. It seems there are fewer and fewer of us left however that know how to turn a wrench and build it ourselves. Everything changes eventually. Just as we saw that 19 different car magazines have come to the end of their printed publication life last month, I believe we are seeing the beginning of the end of the car classic car hobby and it just am just a bit sad for that. I hope that whatever passion the younger generation has gives them the same fulfillment as we've had with our cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
I've said this before here, prices are going to plummet just as I have seen other "era type" cars skyrocket in price fueled by the generation that had these in their youth, and there are only so many to go around, so the cars that are the rarest and/or lowest original miles get the highest prices and then on down from there to the parts type cars that people pull out of the woods because now they are hot sellers and reproduction companies can make profit on needed parts to bring back alive these cars - simply supply and demand, except it is generational and when that generation hits the age of retirement or more, there is no demand and prices decline and parts availability dries up.

You know the trend is on a downward spiral when the big parts suppliers offer big discounts on their catalog of parts to liquidate inventories. OPGI is have a big sale - so that's my sign that the interest in the GTO has cooled off and is sliding down. But this will be true of most all makes of muscle cars.

In my opinion, most of the high dollar cars are purchased by investors. Like all stocks, they were a good commodity to invest in AND the government doesn't know what you paid for it or what you $sell it for - so they don't collect the taxes off of you, but the guy who registers the car has to foot the bill. What a great money making scheme and you do not have to pay a stock broker. The key is to know when to sell, but these are the guys who buy the 1 known to exist, 1 of 50 made, rotisserie restored using all NOS parts and documented, etc.. These cars will be the ones to hold value. The average off the assembly line car won't be holding high value and the longer you hang on to it, the more it will depreciate and more than not, the guy who does buy the car has a vision of it done up his way and will undo what the car is and revitalize it in a completely different, and desired look, based on the current social trend of the buyer/builder. You see it already with LS swaps, Pontiac engine builders and parts suppliers geared up for the LS engines/swaps, 17"-18" rims & tires, coil over suspensions, electronics, etc.. It's already here.

I think the $350K build from Kindigit is another way of saying "I'm not interested" without insulting anyone. He is more of a custom builder than restoration guy from what I have seen. I can't think of any factory restoration that could ever cost $350K to build unless the car was going to be dipped in gold. For $350K, I'll restore the car because I'll take it to another restoration shop and have it done for 70K and pocket the rest. ?

Same goes for these junk cars people drag to swap meets and advertise for sale. People are not going to pay money for junk that requires 50K to bring back to life and only have it worth 25K. The muscle car craze days are over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
With the shift to electric cars in the not too distant future, the gas stations will start going away too. I saw in the same HMM the GM debut of electric motors for classic cars that bolt up to the original drive train. They had an old C-10 at SEMA last fall with the electric conversion. It won't happen overnight, but will happen and maybe it needs to with global warming, but I have to ask, what about the batteries that will have to be recycled? Will our beloved classic cars wind up going to the crusher? Hopefully I will be long gone before then. I am glad to have grown up in the 60's and 70's and to have experienced these cars when they were new. Kids once drag raced across the back of my high school parking lot. One guy even had a set of M&H drag-master slicks he would put on his 67 390ci Mustang and open his headers. his dad had lots of money apparently! Everything changes. It is amazing to me though how many shops like Kindig there are out there building these over-build show pieces that no one will ever drive. Just shows how many people there are with too-much money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
This was one of the best and most informative threads I ever read here. I actually read it several times and saved it in my favorites. It mirrors exactly how I feel but didn't know how to articulate. Thank you to all who contributed, Nicholas.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14 Posts
Electric cars will not replace the ICE. EV's cannot equal petrol engines in range and economy. Everyone can keep believing the uninformed tree huggers but reality cannot be changed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
The only thing holding back electric cars is the lack of charging infrastructure particularly in the west. Technology will solve the charging times in a few years. I'm willing to bet within twenty years you'll not be able to buy a gasoline/diesel vehicle at all. The British Parliament just passed a law prohibiting the sale of new gasoline/diesel vehicles by 2035. Volvo and VW (now the largest manufacturer in the world) have already announced they will no longer sell gas/diesel vehicles within the next few years. Even Airstream trailers are working on a trailer that will contain batteries that will extend a tow vehicles range. The future is coming, you may not like it, but it's coming fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Interesting discussion, I have been thinking for sometime about this. I have a beautiful restored 1950 GMC p/u power steering, vintage air, 350 engine etc it usually wins something at car shows it drives down the highway like a dream. I also have a 1965 GTO that I am finishing up it’s as nice of build as you will find. I was so proud of both cars and wanted to show them off to my grandchildren They were not too impressed. I guess what I’m trying to say is that this is a different generation. I’m 72 and in the 60’s everything was about cars: dragging Main Street, challengious at red lights, or county road, shade tree mechanics, going to the dealership to see the new models etc, etc..
We had oil in our blood. This new generation sadly will never know the awesome times we had in the 60’s
It’s should be no surprise that the cars we loved don’t have a lot of appeal to the generations who have never expierenced these great times. My generation is retiring and hopefully have saved a little bit of money to afford trying to relive the glory days. Once we are gone I don’t think there is going to much of a demand for the beautiful machines of the past. I hope ? I’m wrong, but I don’t think so.
Thanks For Letting Me Rant!!!!
Desertman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Hey Desertman,

I am with you brother. It was a blast growing up in the muscle car days. I have had my 65 GTO since the day I was discharged from the Navy in 1972. Years ago my brother-in-law told me not to restore it. He suggested I buy somebody else’s restored classic car. His reasoning was I would never get back the amount of money I put into it. I did not take his advice. I am rebuilding my car for me, not to sell it. Since I am doing all the work myself I probably could make a few bucks on it, but I won’t. I know every bolt, nut and washer on this car. I taught myself how to weld and had fun doing it. The car looks like a Pontiac inside and out until you look under the hood. This isn’t a stock restoration. 383 stroker with lots of chrome, Tremec 6 speed, rack and pinion steering, disc brakes all around, 3 point seat belts front and rear, etc. my build, my choices. In my case, my sons will fight over this car when I am gone.

NoAngelBuddy

Interesting discussion, I have been thinking for sometime about this. I have a beautiful restored 1950 GMC p/u power steering, vintage air, 350 engine etc it usually wins something at car shows it drives down the highway like a dream. I also have a 1965 GTO that I am finishing up it’s as nice of build as you will find. I was so proud of both cars and wanted to show them off to my grandchildren They were not too impressed. I guess what I’m trying to say is that this is a different generation. I’m 72 and in the 60’s everything was about cars: dragging Main Street, challengious at red lights, or county road, shade tree mechanics, going to the dealership to see the new models etc, etc..
We had oil in our blood. This new generation sadly will never know the awesome times we had in the 60’s
It’s should be no surprise that the cars we loved don’t have a lot of appeal to the generations who have never expierenced these great times. My generation is retiring and hopefully have saved a little bit of money to afford trying to relive the glory days. Once we are gone I don’t think there is going to much of a demand for the beautiful machines of the past. I hope ? I’m wrong, but I don’t think so.
Thanks For Letting Me Rant!!!!
Desertman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Thanks for your response. I’d love to see some pictures of your goat.
As you can see, still a work in progress. Doing interior this winter and new wiring. All metal fab, new panels and welding completed (finally). Will paint it Soul Red this summer. I have learned so much about welding I am looking forward to another project. What is proving more difficult than expected is getting the fenders properly aligned.

Okay, I’ve shown you mine. Your turn.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
When I first started at my current auto tech job 33 years ago, the garage owner had me working on his, and his friends collector cars, mostly 40's and early 50's vintage. At the time, I thought to myself, 'what the hell am I doing working on these ancient cars?, and why are they even interested in this stuff?' Now I know, that these were Their Cars, from Their Era. Not mine. Now they have all passed, and who knows what became of their cars. I'm now in my 60's, and people will be saying that about my car soon, if not already. We're getting old, time is limited, things are changing. It really sucks, I guess we gotta enjoy it while we can
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
When I first started at my current auto tech job 33 years ago, the garage owner had me working on his, and his friends collector cars, mostly 40's and early 50's vintage. At the time, I thought to myself, 'what the hell am I doing working on these ancient cars?, and why are they even interested in this stuff?' Now I know, that these were Their Cars, from Their Era. Not mine. Now they have all passed, and who knows what became of their cars. I'm now in my 60's, and people will be saying that about my car soon, if not already. We're getting old, time is limited, things are changing. It really sucks, I guess we gotta enjoy it while we can
But everyone gets old, things are always changing, and it doesn't really suck per say, it is your perspective that sucks. We are patterned thinking beings and change is sometimes hard to accept. We want things to remain the same as we feel comfortable with. Memories can be our own worst enemy if you let them. So you have to learn how to be "memory neutral."

As we get old, we have a tendency to participate less, or get/be involved with daily life - which has changed far from what we once knew. Sometimes change seems forced on us, no one asked us what we think or how we feel - things just change whether you want them to or not, whether you share your input or not.

Think of each generation as a rolling Sunami. When you were part of your generation, your sunami went barreling through and used it weight/size/power to barrel through the generation that preceeded you and made changes that could not be stopped. The generation that you followed saw it coming, but could not hide from it, they could not stand in front of it and stop it, and they had no power over it. So you can stand in front of the sunami and try and stop it and get taken out, make an attempt to ride along with it and go with the flow, or step aside and observe it as it rolls on by and not go with the flow.

I have adjusted my perspectives. Not much I can do at this age. Basically I really don't care to put the effort into things I cannot change or have effect on. So I find myself as the "observer" as I step back and let the world flow by. I focus on those things that make me happy, and run from those things that at this age I know are "traps" aimed at destroying my happiness and adding frustration or grief to my day/life. I essentially weave and bob through life on the terms I know and don't care to change or accept the ways/concepts of others. Think of it as we are walking caretakers of history past - our generation.

So our car's value will drop because the generation (s) behind us are not us anymore than the generation you followed was you. But, I accept it and its OK. I've adapted as this is part of social survival. I didn't grow up with computers or the internet any more than you did. But I have had to learn which has been much harder than those who were born and grew up with computers. But put that into reverse with regards to our cars. We grew up with carburetors, points distributors, junk yard hunting, Muncie 4-speeds, GTO's, street racing, leaded gasoline, and the like and have grown up with and have an understanding of these older cars that the younger generation will never know or experience. So they look to us to help them understand or experience what we have, or what we know. One of the biggest reasons I still enjoy the old cars is not because they will be obsolete, just like I am getting, but because if fuels those who may continue the interest in these old cars when they ask us questions, or drop by at a car show, or stop you out on the street to inquire about your car. When I am out in my '73 Fury and someone just oogles over it, I always tell them to take a seat behind the wheel and get a feel for what this kind of car was like back in the day, check out all the room, look over that huge hood going out in front of you. It just lights them up..........and it'll be a memory they will remember long after I am gone. Maybe I just hooked another person into carrying the interest in our old cars/generation into their generation.

So my perspective has changed, but not me. Our cars will become less desireable, drop in value, fall by the wayside when you can't get any parts for them and the art of steel autobody repair and "old school" mechanics have become forgotten and swapped for whatever the next generation of transporation has for the evolving world. In the meantime, I drive around in my "old car" and smile all the way recalling my youth and its memories of our cars.......because I can and "they" can't. (y) So sad "they" missed out on it, but the generation behind us simply insisted on change and doing "things their" way. Boy did they screw up. LOL
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top