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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All!
Are the wires for my 68 worth $100? Do they perform that much better then, say $50 ones? Best ones for my GTO?
 

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Its all about resistance. Better wires are usually bigger in MM's and have less loss in electrical delivery. Are the $100 wires better than a $50 wire? Personally, I don't think you would really feel the difference, but if you were using a hotter ignition set-up, then I would want to utilize the extra voltage and/or features of the system and go with the better wires - in my opinion.
 

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I just put in a SS ignition, so food for thought. Thanx
 

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I just put in a SS ignition, so food for thought. Thanx
"SS Ignition"?

I am going with a Pertronix Flame Thrower distributor, Flame Thrower II coil, and MSD6AL box. I bought the Taylor brand Thunder Volt 8.2 mm wires having a resistance of 40 Ohms per foot - which really means little to me being a non-electrical guru, but I did compare others that were rated higher as having a higher resistance per foot, and lower resistance of course carries a better spark, so that was what I went with. I have used Taylor wires in the past with no issues. The part number I have is 84662.

The important thing to consider is the spark plug boot angles. The one at the rear on the drivers side and next to the steering shaft is better fitted with a 45 degree boot. Taylor offers different colors and can be application specific, or generic, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
"SS Ignition"?

I am going with a Pertronix Flame Thrower distributor, Flame Thrower II coil, and MSD6AL box. I bought the Taylor brand Thunder Volt 8.2 mm wires having a resistance of 40 Ohms per foot - which really means little to me being a non-electrical guru, but I did compare others that were rated higher as having a higher resistance per foot, and lower resistance of course carries a better spark, so that was what I went with. I have used Taylor wires in the past with no issues. The part number I have is 84662.

The important thing to consider is the spark plug boot angles. The one at the rear on the drivers side and next to the steering shaft is better fitted with a 45 degree boot. Taylor offers different colors and can be application specific, or generic, as well.
Solid State (points and cond.) What is a MSD6AL? I don't know the different distributors or what the letters mean? I am a novice with this stuff. In 68, we didn't have this stuff to chose from..
 

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Solid State (points and cond.) What is a MSD6AL? I don't know the different distributors or what the letters mean? I am a novice with this stuff. In 68, we didn't have this stuff to chose from..
In '68 you had options, expensive, and not as many. Dual points were the thing and CD ignitions. (y)

The MSD (Multiple Spark Discharge) provides additional sparking at lower RPM's. The MSD6A is what many use and I used in 1982 on a build back then. The MSD6AL is the same except with a built in rev-limiter for those of us who like to shift hard/fast and on ocassion miss a shift. The rev-limiter cuts power to the spark and keeps the RPM's from going past your set point and exploding your engine. In the past, you could buy a tach that was used as the rev-limiter - I think mine was a Mallory and it had a shift light and the rev-limiter all built into the tach.

Here is a little more info for you to read. They can be used with points type distributors:

 

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Discussion Starter #7
That was awesome. Thank-you. I had the 3 speed auto, then and now. Do remember I would have to go on hwy to blow out the carbs every so often from build up. I had a HO in 68. Would blow the doors off 409's, 383, 390's, 396's etc. We raced on a section of RT95 in Phila. It was completed in sections. We had 7 miles of closed hwy for a few years. Anyway, I remember wires, plugs for hotter spark, timing. I was never mechanical. I learned how to work on vehicles restoring 1967 M151A1 Army jeep.
 

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