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Discussion Starter #1
My 1970 GTO has been parked for 5 years in the garage. I'm asking for suggestions about what to do before I start it

I'm afraid of the fuel in the tank, so I'm thinking about disconnecting the intake to the fuel pump, and rigging a hose that will run to a gas can with fresh fuel.

I'm going to replace the battery, oil, filter, and spark plugs.

Does anything else jump out at you?
 

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Good results

I think sharing my experience might help someone.

The only thing I did that required creative thinking was the fuel issue. Not knowing, or trusting the old gas required a work around. I disconnected the rubber fuel line from the fuel pump intake. It was about 8 inches long, with the other end connected to the steel line running along the frame to the gas tank. I purchased a longer piece of the same diameter hose, and submerged it in a gas can full of new fuel. [That was actually the last step]

First I replaced the spark plugs, changed the oil and filter, and checked the coolant. Radiator was about half full, but still green. There was some creepy looking white stuff that appeared to be growing in there, so flushing and replacing still need to be done - Later. I filled it up with fresh water, for now. The battery was replaced.

With the coil wire removed I cranked the engine a couple cycles. I did that about 4 times waiting a minute in between. I can't say I knew what I was doing, but figured gently splashing some oil around inside the engine would be kinder than just going for it.

Hooked up the coil wire and had my friend use a squirt bottle to spray some gas into the carburetor. He stopped, I cranked the motor and it ran for a few seconds until that fuel was gone. Waited a couple minutes (again, gently with something we care about) and did it a couple more times.

With the fuel lines full of fuel I gave it a little gas with the accelerator pedal, and my favorite old GTO roared to life. Man I love that sound. I didn't do anything crazy with the gas pedal, just slight increases in RPM's. Let it run for a few minutes, not enough for it to get hot, and shut her down.
Came back an hour later, and without priming the carb, the car cranked right up. Man these are great engines. I don't know what kind of a fool lets a car like this sit for 5 years (Me of course) but we gently brought it back to life, and it sounds like it never missed a beat.

Three flat tires, so no test drive today. When I find a cheap set of 14's we'll find out about the rest of the mechanicals.
 

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Sounds like you made it work, the only thing I would add for people searching the archive is to fill the new oil filter with oil before installing to get the oil to the moving parts quicker.
You can also fill the float bowls in the carb through the vents.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good suggestion

You're right.
I've been driving Honda Accords for 25 years, so when I crawled under the GOAT to replace the oil filter I was delighted to remember that it installed straight up and down. Honda's go on sideways, so you can't fill the filter with oil first.
If I don't sell this car soon, I'll change the oil again after about 100 miles. I'm expecting gunk to release from inside the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Transmission issue

A couple weeks have gone by, and I was ready to drive this 70 GTO out of the garage. 3 flat tires, but I needed to drive it 20 feet onto the driveway.
Cranked up the engine, put it in drive, and drove it out of the garage. The high pitched whining noise was the power steering pump, low fluid (fixed now).

I replaced the 3 flats with serviceable cheapo tires. I started the car to move it to a better spot and was surprised to find the transmission did not immediately engage. I had to run the RPMs up before the transmission "caught". I drove it 100 feet to it's current location. Tested reverse. Same lack of immediate action, but it did engage at higher than normal RPMs.

The fluid is a little low, slightly below the minimum mark.

So, my question, this transmission fluid is old. Does it break down over time?
Obviously replacing it is going to happen sooner or later.
Or, I know the fluid runs down into the pan. Does it need to be run for a period to enable the various chambers in the transmission to be full of fluid?

Any opinions on this would be appreciated.
 

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A couple weeks have gone by, and I was ready to drive this 70 GTO out of the garage. 3 flat tires, but I needed to drive it 20 feet onto the driveway.
Cranked up the engine, put it in drive, and drove it out of the garage. The high pitched whining noise was the power steering pump, low fluid (fixed now).

I replaced the 3 flats with serviceable cheapo tires. I started the car to move it to a better spot and was surprised to find the transmission did not immediately engage. I had to run the RPMs up before the transmission "caught". I drove it 100 feet to it's current location. Tested reverse. Same lack of immediate action, but it did engage at higher than normal RPMs.

The fluid is a little low, slightly below the minimum mark.

So, my question, this transmission fluid is old. Does it break down over time?
Obviously replacing it is going to happen sooner or later.
Or, I know the fluid runs down into the pan. Does it need to be run for a period to enable the various chambers in the transmission to be full of fluid?

Any opinions on this would be appreciated.
I would drop the pan and change the fluid and filter.
Also check the vacuum lines and check for leaks there is a vacuum modulator that may be sticky or if there are leaks not enough vacuum to work the diaphragm.
My '67 had all original hose and I replaced it all, the 90 on the line going to the modulator had a crack in it.
 
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