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Discussion Starter #1
So I finally decided to dig into the rust bubbles my car has and unfortunetly I wish I hadnt. Both doors towards the front fenders have rotted all the way thru, the pass side rear 1/4 and the back of both doors have small rust blotches all the way thru the doors.

My question is my options on repairs without breaking the bank? Or if its possible... Dont really have the means to cut off parts of the car and reweld metal in place of it. The holes are about the size of a quarter up to a silver dollar size.

Thoughts? My cars a mess right now and it sucks. :(
 

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Nope, no such thing as cheap repair. You could just throw some bondo in it and sand it down for now, then later when funds or skills are up do the repairs properly. The most important part is to get the rust to stop for now. Don't go to crazy digging for now. I did and my 66 is in pieces, lots and lots..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I did stop once I got the holes there. Got most of the rust around the holes out and just basically painted over it for now. (was bare shiny metal around the holes)

So as far as "properly" repairing the rust, what is the proper way? what do most shops do to fix it and how much does it cost? I mean lucky for me its a solid car other than these 3-4 spots. Plan to possibly let a shop repair the rust and just shoot primer on the car until I got the funds for a nice paintjob.

Trying to avoid taking the car apart to the point of not being able to drive it. Cause I know how that can turn out.
 

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Trying to avoid taking the car apart to the point of not being able to drive it. Cause I know how that can turn out.
Like me! :lol:

I had the same experience and I can't give you a figure on fixing just the holes since my "digging" turned into a frame off resto, but my shop said I could stitch together 3 patch panels and then cover them in bondo. The concern was that as the filler shrinks, you would see it through the paint down the road. So that left me with another option of a skin or full quarter. The seam for the skin would show when you looked inside the trunk so I opted for full rear quarters. A lot more expensive, but it's the way I went.

I guess if you want a driver that looks decent, go with patch panels. If you want as close to factory new, go with a full panels with skins as a middle ground.

That's what I've learned so far and good luck!
 

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if holes are silver dollar size find a good welder and pay him to stitch in small patches, then you can grind and fill and smooth yourself. get a QT mixed to match your paint and feather it in from the body line down. should get you through until your ready for the Full Monty.....if you check the Body Shop Supply houses they can actually mix your paint match in aerosol cans for you if you dont have the spray equipment (around $25.00 a can i think)
 

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Primer doesn't seal the metal from moisture. Body shop told me to put some enamel, spray bomb Krylon, over the repair, then sand it off when getting ready for paint. Welding is expensive. My 66 was fiberglassed in 02, 08 I had bubbles behind the doors and other places, lots of places, car was far worse than I knew. But, sealing up the rust, spray undercoat or por 15 into the inside of doors or where repairs are and just stop the rust. You can do a lot of body work by hand with some sanding blocks and get the car straighter. I worked at a body shop for a few months this year and learned a ton, and I painted a bunch of cars in the past. Find a good guy at a local shop and volunteer some time cleaning for some training, even on their cars. or watch the videos bear always talks about, paintafication or whatever. Autozone, get a gallon of bondo, follow mixing instructions, smear it on, sand it off, when it's flat, throw some paint on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I used a rust preventive krylon over the bare metal then shot over that with touch up enamel as close to my color as I could find at orielly. Turns out it matched pretty well. Hopefully that'll seal it from moisture till I can get it worked on.
 

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This is something you can do, if you're willing to take the time to learn - go slow - and understand that you WILL make some mistakes but that's ok because you can always sand/cut them out and start over. The only "fer sure" way to end rust is to cut it all out and put in fresh metal, then get it 100% sealed from the atmosphere with a quality combination of coatings (quality epoxy primer and paint). For now you've probably done the best you can at a temporary repair - just realize that what you've done is sort of like doing CPR on someone whose heart has stopped: you aren't going to fix the problem that way, all you're really doing is slowing down the rate at which they're dying until the problem can be addressed correctly. :D

There are lots of good resources available for you to use to get education. I highly recommend Kevin Tetz's videos - available various places, including Kevin Tetz's Paintucation OFFICIAL SITE

Bear
 
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