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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Oil hasn't been changed in a few years...I'm assuming. All I know about it is what I was told, it's a 350 bored over and cammed. My question is how concerned would you be? It has only idled and drove about 4 miles in the last year before the oil was changed. It smelled like gas and had chunks but no "milky" stuff. The oil was checked threw the dipstick and it looked old but nothing to suspect this was in there, how far would you break the engine down to investigate? Thanks for reading my book lol forgot to add that there was an open hole on the manifold where the pcv was supposed to be, that has been fixed, nothing special about this car and I plan on driving it a lot because why not.

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https://youtu.be/Se4M-3oNQEg
Oil hasn't been changed in a few years...I'm assuming. All I know about it is what I was told, it's a 350 bored over and cammed. My question is how concerned would you be? It has only idled and drove about 4 miles in the last year before the oil was changed. It smelled like gas and had chunks but no "milky" stuff. The oil was checked threw the dipstick and it looked old but nothing to suspect this was in there, how far would you break the engine down to investigate? Thanks for reading my book lol forgot to add that there was an open hole on the manifold where the pcv was supposed to be, that has been fixed, nothing special about this car and I plan on driving it a lot because why not.

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NOT GOOD at all. That open hole where the PCV valve goes may have been a good source for water to enter the engine as that is about what it looks like to me. Certainly doesn't look like oil that was changed a year ago.

You may even have a blown head gasket and water has gotten into the oil. The only way to inspect is to pull the engine out as you cannot pull the pan on a Pontiac with the engine in the car. I might pull the valve covers and see if you have any "milky" oil or moisture in that area or at the top undersides of the valve covers.

I honestly can't think of any good way to flush out that oil pan without removal. I think anything you do, will be taking a chance short of pulling the pan. If any of that goo has plugged up the screen on the oil pickup, your oil pump may not suck up any oil when it first fires up (or at all) and the engine will be damaged. If you simply add fresh oil & filter, you will most likely draw some of that bad oil up into the engine and that too could result in damages.

If I didn't care about the engine and if I was prepared to rebuild or replace it anyway, then I might chance it and add fresh oil & filter and go for it. Pull the coil wire and crank it over a little to get oil back into the engine. Then reconnect the coil wire and fire it up. But if the engine is damaged (which may not show up right away), wiping out bearings, lifters, cam, etc., then expect a rebuild. If it runs, I would get it up to temperature, then shut it down, and do another oil & filter change. So there is no guarantee that this will work or you won't severely damage the engine.

Sorry to be so negative, but it doesn't look good. Others may chime in with their opinions, but I would pull the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
All bad lol guess I wanted to here it'll be fine. Thanks for the input I didn't plan on pulling the engine but now it will be added to the list I belive it to be original and it runs strong the one time I drove it. I planned on dropping in a new motor when this one gave up the ghost but I wanted a few solid years with it. I appreciate your thoughts as I am just a basic backyard make it work kinda guy and this is my first Pontiac...let the games begin

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No, that doesn't look good at all but I would maybe try a few things before I pulled the engine, you have nothing else to lose right? I would take a magnet and run it through that sludge that you drained out and see what comes up if there's a lot of metal in it that's not good sign of wiped bearings Etc I would do an engine flush like Jim described do a couple of oil changes put a pressure gauge on it and see what kind of oil pressure you have. Before that even if you suspect a blown head gasket you could rent a tester that pressurizes the coolant system and see if that holds pressure. Good luck!
 

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I would pull the valve covers too and see what it looks like in there if there's a lot of rust that's not a good sign or if there's a lot of debris or sludge you can at least clean that up with a Shop-vac and maybe flush some gasoline through there let it drain through the engine to the pan taking any big chunks with it.
 

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I would pull the valve covers too and see what it looks like in there if there's a lot of rust that's not a good sign or if there's a lot of debris or sludge you can at least clean that up with a Shop-vac and maybe flush some gasoline through there let it drain through the engine to the pan taking any big chunks with it.
I would go with a diesel douche instead of gas then reinstall the drain plug and add a gallon of diesel and 2 quarts of 30 wt and fire it up for a minute, shut it down and then repeat.
Speaking of big chunks I'm off to the shop now to pull my engine to assess the damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great info seems to be consistent around the room, I'll start with the easy stuff valve covers to get a better idea, should I try a top engine cleaner vs the diesel thing?

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Great info seems to be consistent around the room, I'll start with the easy stuff valve covers to get a better idea, should I try a top engine cleaner vs the diesel thing?

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I have have heard it said that the old farmers used to run kerosene through an engine to clean it. Kerosene is similar to diesel.

I used to add a quart of transmission fluid in my oil before changing it. Transmission fluid is a good cleaner, and still an oil. I would let the engine idle, let it get warmed up, then drain. It will thin the oil, so I was told to just let it idle rather than rev it up. Change the oil & filter. Did this on several "old" cars I had and never had a problem.

So you might want to pour several quarts into the oil pan with the oil pan plug installed and let it sit for a week and let the trans fluid soften and cut through any crap on the bottom of the oil pan. Then drain it to flush. I used the Dextron trans fluid, but I suspect the diesel or kerosene would do the same thing.

Then you might add a new oil filter, your good oil, 1/2 quart Dextron to that and fire it up and let it idle and get warmed up. Then shut it down, drain the hot oil, install a new filter, and fresh oil. Gonna cost you a little, but it may do the job.

No guarantees, as you still may have a bad head gasket or something else gone wrong, but it could be worth a try if nothing else to lose. :thumbsup:
 
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