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What do you guys thing? This is my 67 COnvertible. Paint needs help. Cant do much with it because its the original paint and its so thin I cant buff anymore. The car is all numbers matching original and I like to keep it that way. Everything on it looks great but the paint. So do I paint it or keep the original paint on it? I am having a real hard decision because its only original once. Thanks for the input. Doc




 

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Original paint cars are dropping like flys. If it is numbers matching AND original paint you probably added 10k just to the normal fly-by-night auction prices for that same car with a respray.

In the end do what makes you happy, but there are more and more classes for survivors, and if what you say is true, you have them all beat. Love it for what it still is.
 

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I say only paint it if you can throw a good paint job on it. And by good I mean body off, and media blasted. If you are just throwing a 4k paint job in it.... Leave it alone. It still looks pretty good
 

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The decision is ultimately yours. You have to be happy with the car for whatever reasons you choose. Resale value only matters if you plan to (or need to) sell it.

If it were mine, I'd leave it as is for as long as I could, and make sure to keep it covered - limit as much as possible the time it spends exposed to sun light. MAYBE consider putting some good quality clear coat over the existing paint to get some UV protection but I'd have to think long and hard about even doing that. Like you said, it's only original once and "giving that up" is a huge step not to be taken lightly.

Regardless of what you decide, that's one nice looking ride! :thumbsup::patriot:

Bear
 

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I agree with Bear. They are only original once. I respectfully disagree with Tony: an original paint car does not need to be stripped to metal or frame-off'ed to be refinished. Leaving the original baked on lead based primer is superior protection...if it hasn't rusted through in the past 48 years, it's not going to with a new top coat. The car would need to be stripped of chrome and trim, blocked, and painted. Probably no need to do the jambs and trunk, either. If it were mine, though, it would stay original. It's actually worth more with original faded paint than with a competent re-spray.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. Bear gave me an idea. I cant buff the paint because its so thin now it rubs through. But something has to be done. The paint is 50 years old has no lustre left to it and is chipped in places. Maybe if I touch up the bad spots and get a good flow of paint I could add some clear to it. That way I could polish now and then again. But that may not be any different than a paint job.

A repaint would have to be sanded down to metal. WOuldnt take much because a couple strokes now brings it down to primer and the old paint is laquer. It also has laquer cracks in a couple spots. Does a paint job really hurt the resale?? I thought it may stay about the same just lose the cost of the paint job.

The car has 60K original miles on it is worth doing anything that needs to be done. No rust, trunk is in great shape and the engine bay looks very nice. Thanks again for the replies. Doc
 

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It's all a matter of taste. If a new shiny paint job would make you love the car more, I say do it. However, depending on your long term plans for this car, the current trends do show that original paint cars are worth more than restored ones with the difference increasing. Throw in the very low mileage of yours, you may lose value with a paint job plus the cost of the paint. Tough decision to make on this one. If you are going to clear coat it, you may as well paint it.

That all being said, if it was mine, I would leave it alone.

Good luck. Whichever way you go will be the right decision.
 

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Don't take it to bare metal. You'll never be able to replicate the level of adhesion and protection that the baked on factory primer has. If you're going to repaint the whole car, roughen the surface only enough to provide good mechanical adhesion (tooth) for what you're going to spray over it. This means wet sand the whole car with 600 grit, perform the initial repair on any areas that need more attention (cracks, pinholes, etc), then apply a good sealer (quality epoxy primer - I like Southern Polyurethanes - reduced according to their instructions) before final correction of any problem spots. This is a decision point. If you want a 'laser straight' car this is the point where you begin with as many iterations of primer/surface/block sanding (using guide coats) as it takes to get it that way. Then you apply another coat of sealer, followed by your color coats then clear coats, color sanding, cutting and buffing. If you don't want to go through all that then after that first coat of sealer and corrections, then apply another coat of sealer, then color coats, then clear coats. Color sand, cut, and buff if you want to eliminate all the egg shell (and there will always be some).

You're talking about a significant investment of time and money here, especially if you want near perfection, to get to a car where it will be worth almost as much as it is like it sits today untouched. :D

If how it looks and how you feel looking at it is more important than how much it's worth to someone else, then by all means - go for it. That's exactly what I did with my '69. I spent probably 2-3 times more building it than anyone in their right mind would ever pay me for it, and I'm perfectly fine with that :)

Bear
 

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I agree with Bear here. No need to take an original paint car down to bare metal. A decent, non-stripped factory quality paint job will cost between 10 and 20 thousand dollars. At least on the West Coast. A quickie re-spray about 6 to 8k. Not approaching factory quality. It's your car....follow your heart. As a side note, a good friend of mine had his '65 painted for 10k about 9 years ago. I told him two stage would be too shiny for his tastes. He let the painter talk him into base/clear. Car looks like a glazed ham. Pretty, but not even close to correct. He doesn't like how it looks and wishes he went with a less spectacular single stage paint job. As a result, the car has been sitting in the garage, in pieces, for the past 9 years. Do what will suit you and your needs. But I would think really hard before I took an original car and stripped it down, putting it out of action for who knows how long.
 

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Personally..I would leave that car as is!!!! Like others say it is almost 'impossible' to duplicate the factory finish. I think your car is worth more as it sits....add the extra value of originality + the cost very high quality paint job.....When I look for a car, I prefer original paint....that way I know there is no body work or surprises lurking underneath... IMHO!
 

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I wouldn't paint it, it looks good for 50 year old original.
I have also dealt with the paint shop from hell once that did nothing but lose parts and take my money so I am biased on my opinion.
 

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or you could paint it yourself.. pic up some books and dvd's.. get yourself a hood or a fender. and get a feel for body work, and painting.. you dont need to rush into it, you may pick it up quick.. probably quicker than it will be done dropping it off at a body shop, if you know what I mean.. go with a two stage.
 
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