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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I decided to take on and attempt this repair and paint, these hacks have so much construction adhesive in the channel my old gasket wouldn't fit. I know the right way is to cut out the bad stuff and weld in new but I can't do that so I was thinking of making a tape mold and use J B weld that I could shape or I have a roll of thin aluminum I could fashion some pieces and rivet or epoxy them on. Most of it gets covered by the gasket so I don't need to be to picky about it. I also ordered a spray can of 1K base/clear from Paintscratch.com for the area around the lip that was not painted well. I started sanding the clear down but how far do I have to go before priming and painting, was planning on using an etching primer then paint. I'm not sure what kind of paint it is but it seems pretty brittle and guessing it was painted 10 or more years ago. Any suggestions are welcome as I know just enough to be dangerous.
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I'm in the midst of doing my trunk lip now. I'm wire wheeling the crud out and sand blasinting the rust and left-overs away. Then, 2K priming the lip, then on to paint eventually. Self etching primer is best for aluminum, galvanized steel, and smooth SS. I have used it on regular steel, but is not necessary so long as the steel is rough sanded and/or blasted. I have had adhesion problems with self etching primer followed by regular primer or paint when not sanded/prepped for paint. If sand blasting is not in your arsenal, I would wire wheel it, then use a rust dissolving gel, wash/clean well, then prime and paint.

I can't say much to the paint compatibility with your old paint and new, but a 10 year old paint job should take well to about anything you throw at it...IMO.

You want to take the old paint down to good clean steel without pimples or underlying boogers. If there is no evidence of underlying bumps, you just sand the old paint so that it blends with the new fresh steel surface...if that makes sense.
 

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I would wire-wheel as much as possible and then use a rust converter on it. After that, I would fill any cracks and holes with one of the many metal filling epoxies available. Will likely last for ten years or more, maybe even forever. That rust converter works well, and the new metal filling epoxies by JB or Permatex are strong and permanent.
When I had the rear window channel on my '65 replaced in 1983, the body guys brazed in two drain tubes, one in each lower corner. I connected a hose that drains out through the bottom of the trunk. I did this because the car was parked outside and was my daily driver for years and years. 40 years later, no rust has formed.
 

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Yuck. You want to get that metal as shiny clean as possible to remove all the rust. A wire wheel can get into the channel, but I find that sometimes don't do much once all the wires bend in the direction of the rotation and clean little. I find that one of the Shaft Mounted Polycarbide Abrasive Wheel type wheels work better. You can get them at Harbor Freight and I think Lowe's and Home Depot have similar.

3 in. Shaft Mounted Polycarbide Abrasive Wheel

Once you get the channel as clean as possible, I would spray the channel with spray bomb Rust Reformer. Let it dry good. Then come back with the abrasive wheel and sand the channel again which will leave the rust reformer in the pits and seal them. WTF your say? You are going to use fiberglass cloth to go over and cover the rotted channel so you want a clean metal surface for the fiberglass to stick to. But first......

If you have some thin aluminum, or sheet steel, cut it to the lip height and shape it to the areas you need to fix The channel will have a roll or radius at its bottom, but I would only cut the strip wide enough to follow the straight side and not the radius unless you have some way of roll forming the piece which can be a little tricky or roll form the edge with a hammer after the JB dries.. I might do the entire channel by sanding the outside of the channel to bare metal and overlaying all new thin aluminum or metal sheet and using the JB Weld to bond the 2 pieces together - you can do this in sections if that makes it easier. Rough up the aluminum or stell sheet to give the JB something to bite into, you don't want a smooth surface. Then put some clamps to hold the 2 pieces together and let them dry. You may have to do a section at a time. Don't worry about any JB that squeezes out - leave it and you can sand it off later as it sands easy.

Once you have done your overlay, now go back and apply the woven fiberglass matt to the inside of the channel. You can buy the fiberglass resin and activator at most auto stores or Home Depot/Lowe's as well as the matt. Cut the matt with scissors as needed to fit the channel sides and bottom - basically reinforcing the entire channel. Work with smaller pieces as it is easier to do. You want to make sure the matt is wetted by the fiberglass resin and no dry spots or air under the matt. Rubber gloves can help. Use a small putty knife or the wife's spatula to work the matt into the side corners of the channel or any place you see the matt not laying flat. Better to have too much resin than not enough and the matt dry. It will set up kinda quick depending on how much activator you mix in. You will figure this out as you go.

When done, you should now have an overlayed outer channel and fiberglass matted inner channel. When all cured, you can go back and apply the JB Weld along the base of the new metal where the radius would be - you can use it like bondo and let it dry but make sure you sand along that area to scuff it up. Then come back and do any sanding or shaping you might want to do with a sanding block. Then you should be ready for primer.

If you are real fussy, you can smooth out the inner channel, but I would use the Short Hair fiberglass bondo for this. Apply it inside the channel to fill in any dips or uneven areas, then sand down smooth. It will be tedious work and not sure worth it if the rubber seal is going to cover it, but your choice. You can also use the fiberglass bondo instead of JB on the outer lower radius of the new metal strip, but I think the JB will work.

That is just one way I might do the job. I could change my mind once I actually started that job as once you get into it, what I thought would work isn't working as planned. So this is just a backyard suggestion.
(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm in the midst of doing my trunk lip now. I'm wire wheeling the crud out and sand blasinting the rust and left-overs away. Then, 2K priming the lip, then on to paint eventually. Self etching primer is best for aluminum, galvanized steel, and smooth SS. I have used it on regular steel, but is not necessary so long as the steel is rough sanded and/or blasted. I have had adhesion problems with self etching primer followed by regular primer or paint when not sanded/prepped for paint. If sand blasting is not in your arsenal, I would wire wheel it, then use a rust dissolving gel, wash/clean well, then prime and paint.

I can't say much to the paint compatibility with your old paint and new, but a 10 year old paint job should take well to about anything you throw at it...IMO.

You want to take the old paint down to good clean steel without pimples or underlying boogers. If there is no evidence of underlying bumps, you just sand the old paint so that it blends with the new fresh steel surface...if that makes sense.
Ya not going to sandblast because of the mess in the finish trunk plus I don’t have one so going the wire wheel route. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would wire-wheel as much as possible and then use a rust converter on it. After that, I would fill any cracks and holes with one of the many metal filling epoxies available. Will likely last for ten years or more, maybe even forever. That rust converter works well, and the new metal filling epoxies by JB or Permatex are strong and permanent.
When I had the rear window channel on my '65 replaced in 1983, the body guys brazed in two drain tubes, one in each lower corner. I connected a hose that drains out through the bottom of the trunk. I did this because the car was parked outside and was my daily driver for years and years. 40 years later, no rust has formed.
I thought of the rust converter also so maybe I'll do that instead, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yuck. You want to get that metal as shiny clean as possible to remove all the rust. A wire wheel can get into the channel, but I find that sometimes don't do much once all the wires bend in the direction of the rotation and clean little. I find that one of the Shaft Mounted Polycarbide Abrasive Wheel type wheels work better. You can get them at Harbor Freight and I think Lowe's and Home Depot have similar.

3 in. Shaft Mounted Polycarbide Abrasive Wheel

Once you get the channel as clean as possible, I would spray the channel with spray bomb Rust Reformer. Let it dry good. Then come back with the abrasive wheel and sand the channel again which will leave the rust reformer in the pits and seal them. WTF your say? You are going to use fiberglass cloth to go over and cover the rotted channel so you want a clean metal surface for the fiberglass to stick to. But first......

If you have some thin aluminum, or sheet steel, cut it to the lip height and shape it to the areas you need to fix The channel will have a roll or radius at its bottom, but I would only cut the strip wide enough to follow the straight side and not the radius unless you have some way of roll forming the piece which can be a little tricky or roll form the edge with a hammer after the JB dries.. I might do the entire channel by sanding the outside of the channel to bare metal and overlaying all new thin aluminum or metal sheet and using the JB Weld to bond the 2 pieces together - you can do this in sections if that makes it easier. Rough up the aluminum or stell sheet to give the JB something to bite into, you don't want a smooth surface. Then put some clamps to hold the 2 pieces together and let them dry. You may have to do a section at a time. Don't worry about any JB that squeezes out - leave it and you can sand it off later as it sands easy.

Once you have done your overlay, now go back and apply the woven fiberglass matt to the inside of the channel. You can buy the fiberglass resin and activator at most auto stores or Home Depot/Lowe's as well as the matt. Cut the matt with scissors as needed to fit the channel sides and bottom - basically reinforcing the entire channel. Work with smaller pieces as it is easier to do. You want to make sure the matt is wetted by the fiberglass resin and no dry spots or air under the matt. Rubber gloves can help. Use a small putty knife or the wife's spatula to work the matt into the side corners of the channel or any place you see the matt not laying flat. Better to have too much resin than not enough and the matt dry. It will set up kinda quick depending on how much activator you mix in. You will figure this out as you go.

When done, you should now have an overlayed outer channel and fiberglass matted inner channel. When all cured, you can go back and apply the JB Weld along the base of the new metal where the radius would be - you can use it like bondo and let it dry but make sure you sand along that area to scuff it up. Then come back and do any sanding or shaping you might want to do with a sanding block. Then you should be ready for primer.

If you are real fussy, you can smooth out the inner channel, but I would use the Short Hair fiberglass bondo for this. Apply it inside the channel to fill in any dips or uneven areas, then sand down smooth. It will be tedious work and not sure worth it if the rubber seal is going to cover it, but your choice. You can also use the fiberglass bondo instead of JB on the outer lower radius of the new metal strip, but I think the JB will work.

That is just one way I might do the job. I could change my mind once I actually started that job as once you get into it, what I thought would work isn't working as planned. So this is just a backyard suggestion.
(y)
Ya that's quite involved and I know it's hard to believe but I'm not that fussy about this, when I tried the gasket it covers almost all of the track so not much would show, maybe I'll try the JB weld I have and try and make a mold for the small spots but I know if it's to big of an area it will just crack off so I might have to use the aluminum. I mean the gasket isn't going to fall out there's not that much missing and I might have to glue the gasket in places if I can't form the curl or hook that pinches the gasket in place. Like you said it's going to be trial and error, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So it's looking better already by wire wheeling and sanding then a coat of rust reformer, now I can the areas of repair needed. Still think I'll try and make molds with tape and use the JB Weld for the holes, we'll see how that works and paint is on its way.
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JB Weld is pretty thick. You can also mix aluminum shavings or powder into it to add body. I think you should be able to easily work it. They also make epoxy strips that press into position. If it were me, I would saturate fine cloth in epoxy and lay it over the areas. Talking bedsheet or thinner. Have used this to repair cracked motorcycle fenders, etc. and it lasts forever, you can paint over it, and it is undetectable and strong. The job you are showing right now, even if you did nothing more than glue the weatherstripping back in place will likely last 30 years or so before needing to be re-addressed. Looking good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, ya like I said I'm not going to be to picky as the gasket covers almost all of the damage, I screwed up and bought the 4-6 hour JB weld so going to take until tomorrow before I can work it. So in meantime I'm finishing up the remote oil filters, got the last part in the mail today and waiting for the painted filters to dry.
 

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Thanks, ya like I said I'm not going to be to picky as the gasket covers almost all of the damage, I screwed up and bought the 4-6 hour JB weld so going to take until tomorrow before I can work it. So in meantime I'm finishing up the remote oil filters, got the last part in the mail today and waiting for the painted filters to dry.
Still waiting for those valve covers and breathers...what seems to be the holdup?:confused:
 

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Thanks, ya like I said I'm not going to be to picky as the gasket covers almost all of the damage, I screwed up and bought the 4-6 hour JB weld so going to take until tomorrow before I can work it. So in meantime I'm finishing up the remote oil filters, got the last part in the mail today and waiting for the painted filters to dry.
Not a screw up. I forgot to mention to use the slow drying JB Weld. It is stronger and holds much better in my experience with it.
 

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You thought correctly. That's why combining it with aluminum flakes, cloth, or heck, even sawdust or cut up bristles to add body and structure is a help. Like in fiberglass or rebar in concrete. Adds structural rigidity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You thought correctly. That's why combining it with aluminum flakes, cloth, or heck, even sawdust or cut up bristles to add body and structure is a help. Like in fiberglass or rebar in concrete. Adds structural rigidity.
Ya didn't do any of that but most of it held up, a couple holes opened up so I re did them. Still to soft to sand but it's going to be good enough for who it's for.
 

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Thanks to all for the info. I need to do similar repairs, but damage on mine is not as bad. Did you remove the torsion bars to allow the trunk lid hinges to lay down? What was the procedure?
 
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