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Discussion Starter #1
I ordered a 7 piece trunk pan from e-bay and they shipped me a chevelle pan. I laid it in and although it was the wrong size, it made me realize that this is not going to be as easy as I thought. I know there are lots of threads on this, but I need a little advice from those who have done it already.

1. Since the new pan extends about 3/4" beyond the front and back lip, should I cut the old pan right at the bend and flange it so that I do not have to cut the new pan at all?

2. For the two center and front/back welds, should I spot weld only with seam sealer or weld continuously?

3. Lower wheel wells are rotted but not bad enough to replace the whole thing. tips for this area?

Thanks for the help.
 

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GYG,
I have done this repair, and I made a webpage about it. The way I did it is not the only way to do it, but it worked for me. It was very important to me to have it look "factory", that is, I did not want to see any signs that it was pieced together (center pan, and side pans). The pans are flanged and the seams can't be seen from the bottom because the reinforcements are there. But from the top, I stitch welded the seams and filled in the imperfections with filler. It looked very good when done. See the webpage for more details on how I spliced it on the front and back edges.

I also had to repair the lower wheel well sections. I fabricated these pieces. Lots of work but it was worth it to me.

Squid's Fab Shop GTO Trunk Replacement

Good luck.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nice. Lots of good info there. I will read this thouroughly before I get started. Looks like it came out great.

I was thinking of flanging the front and back above the bend because I think it may be easier, and my welding skills are not the best. Any opinion on this method?
 

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In my case I split choice....I flanged the back, because the seam would be over the crossbrace and not seen from under the car, and from the inside I dressed it with body filler. I butt welded the front edge of the pans. I made my seam from new to old on the almost vertical section of trunk pan as it goes up over the axle. Granted, not many folks will ever climb under there to see if there's a seam there, but I still felt better knowing it's basically an invisible butt weld.
Good luck,
Dave
 

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Im in the same boat as your are bro. The trunk is the last step before I drop the body back on the frame, and I have literally stared at it the last 3 weeks without touching it because Im unsure how I wanna go about it.

My wheel wheels were rusted in the bottom and I opted to just patch them along with the rusted filler piece. Attached a couple pics hope it helps.
 

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Squidtone, thanks for the post. You are indeed an artist!! I admire anyone who can weld sheetmetal. YOurs came out great. Is your car done now? Still Linden Green??? I'll need to replace the weak original trunk in my '67 one of these days...it's been shabby for about the last 130,000 miles......
 

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Thanks GeeTeeohguy,
Yes, I am now in the middle of my second round of block sanding. I bought my paint. It is Linden Green, I'm going RM Diamont base / clear. I think I will be laying down final paint within the next four weeks. I will post soon on these forums as well as py.

GYG,
I forgot to mention, for that extra touch, cut out the holes in the new pans for the 3 "floor plates". They sell the plates themselves if you don't have your originals.
I also cut out the two small holes for the rubber plugs. Just another detail.
 

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Im in the same boat as you guys and thanks for posting progress pictures. Id say about 50% of my trunk pan is completely gone and along with replacing the whole pan i'll have to replace the pan to 1/4 panel pieces but I have almost no experience doing body work. I figure I'll order a full one piece trunk pan since its so bad, Is a 1 piece pan a better choice or should i go multiple sections?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
67Lemans4dr, The one piece may save you a little welding, but the 3 piece seems alot easier to work with since you are fitting smaller pieces and not the whole thing at once. Also you would need the body off of the frame so you can install from below.

Squid - your webpage is about the only resource that I have found for this process. Thanks for the guidance. I am still a little unsure where to join the old and new pan and weather to butt weld or to flang/lap weld. I am not at all concerned about the appearance from underneath since there will be plenty of other rust to distract anyone who looks.

Would the pan be stronger if I caught the rear crossbrace like you did, or do you think a lap weld below the brace would be strong enough?
 

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gyg,
I don't think it makes a difference either way as far as strength goes. It may be just a question of convenience, like how you go about replacing the two braces that go front to back. The back of these braces hang onto the crossbrace.

And here's another thing to think of regarding "strength", the pans they sell now I think are thinner steel than the original pans. I say this because I bowed out the panels a bit after I welded them in, and I was in there grinding the welds down. Mind you, not by alot, but the trunk pans bowed down a bit. I'm pretty light too. I bowed them back by putting a piece of plywood under there (no gas tank) and jacking it up back into shape. Something to be careful of.
Dave
 

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wow! I was upset that my trunk and under-quarters had some small screwdriver sized rust holes. Good luck with that pan repair I can't weld, ha
 

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Gotyorgoat, I've decided to go with the 3 piece pan with the supports since it will be easier for me to work with the small sections. Currently the body is removed from the frame since the frame/eng/susp is completed. I've removed most of what was left of the old pan and am working on the edges here soon. I will have to replace the 1/4 panel to truck pan pieces and form a few patch plates for the rear section of the fender wells and also the lower portion of the right rear 1/4 panel has a horrendus previous riveted in repair panel that i must remove too. I totalled it up with product from Ames Performance and with everything minus paint it will run me about $1700 in parts to repair from the very end of the car to halfway through the rear fender well. Its a start and I have much to learn so i figured the rear is a good starting point. I'll post more pictures when I learn better how to do that on here.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Making some progress on this trunk pan replacement. As is usually the case, the cancer had spread further than I thought so I've spent more time trying to reconstruct the wheel wells than actually working on the trunk. Squids page is the only reference that I have had since most of the metal was completely gone. I am trying to get this wrapped up so I can install the new gas tank and get back on the road. I havent been able to drive it all summer.

Sux to put in all this work and have the car look the same. There is so much bodywork left on this car just to get it ready for paint that think I might be in over my head.
 

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Nice work, gotyourgoat. I would say you are not over your head, just overwhelmed temporarily. When you get the trunk wrapped up, button up the car and drive it for a year or so before doing the bodywork/paint all at once. Or, do small areas of bodywork as you continue to actually drive and enjoy the car. They don't need to be perfect to be a blast. A lot of guys try to do too much too soon and get overwhelmed and lose interest or just sell the car. You show the skill and aptitude to handle the project, just do it in stages. There are a few guys out there that can tear down an entire car and rebuild it in a single season...but that is not the norm!! Hang in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the encouragement. If I decide to take a break on the bodywork I can always pull in nose first at the local car show and pop the trunk.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I finally got this trunk pan installed, but it took my car of the road all summer and fall. I used a scotchbright pad to scuff up the e-coat and then applied rattle can 2k epoxy primer to the underside. I am then going to apply some 3M undercoating and put the gas tank back in.

Next is the tail panel replacement. Do I need to use a panel adhesive when replacing the tail panel so should I just spot weld it in? It seems like there is factory applied panel adhesive, but how would I use this and still spot weld? Is it one or the other?

It's getting too cold to do any bodywork in my unheated garage, so I think I am going to try to find a low cost shop to take it after the metal work is done.
 

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nice work, like a friend of mine said "i may not be the best welder, but i am one hell of a grinder". Bodywork is pretty much the same concept, build it up to take it back down to smooth, except its at a much finer scale. I did mine body on frame up in around 11 months by myself and started with a nice high desert car, and i had not worked on my vehicles in 25 years. It takes four things, Space, Money, Time, and patients and you will need a boatload of each. Like GeeTee said do it as you drive it, so many tear a car down to the last bolt (sometimes when it is not needed) trying to make them perfect and they get caught in the quagmire of not having enough of one or all of the above, only to let the pile of parts sit for years/decades. Nothing wrong with doing it a panel at a time then covering them with an epoxy primer so you can keep enjoying it. I will say this, paying someone to do body and paint is paying them to "care" about your car and the outcome, thats why a good body/paint job costs so much. Much rather have a running car in flat black than a perfect looking pile of parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That is good advice. I also catch myself spending too much time scraping or sanding areas that will never be seen and then I think to myself that it will never get done at this rate.

My problem is that I only have a few hours per weekend, so doing my own bodywork would take forever. The temps are getting too cold in Denver to do bodywork in an unheated garage anyways, so if I pick it up in the spring, it will be ugly next summer as well.

Any thoughts on the seam sealer at the tail panel?
 
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