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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 12 oz container I'm getting tomorrow and was planning on putting it in my '65 GTO
because It runs a consistent 210 degrees estimated, looking at the factory gauge.
I'm really not expecting much, am I right?
 

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I have a 12 oz container I'm getting tomorrow and was planning on putting it in my '65 GTO
because It runs a consistent 210 degrees estimated, looking at the factory gauge.
I'm really not expecting much, am I right?
I used it in my mild 400CI build when it was running hot. It did drop temps down about 8 degrees.

Don't rely on the factory gauge. Get an inexpensive hand held laser temperature gun at most any auto parts store. My '73 Fury gauge reads hot and would climb to near boiling according to the gauge. Checked with the laser gun, the temps were far cooler and well within boiling over as I had thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I used it in my mild 400CI build when it was running hot. It did drop temps down about 8 degrees.

Don't rely on the factory gauge. Get an inexpensive hand held laser temperature gun at most any auto parts store. My '73 Fury gauge reads hot and would climb to near boiling according to the gauge. Checked with the laser gun, the temps were far cooler and well within boiling over as I had thought.
I have a temperature gun like you describe.
How much difference do you think there is between the actual coolant temperature and the surface of the thermostat housing?

Edit- I just checked my truck and there is a 20 degree difference between the outer housing and my temperature gauge, which I'm pretty
sure is close. I'll check the goat later.
Edit- The goat checked 171 degrees with the gun at the housing, which would be about 190 degrees, if the temperature differential is the same as the truck, so maybe I'm good.
 

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I have a temperature gun like you describe.
How much difference do you think there is between the actual coolant temperature and the surface of the thermostat housing?

Edit- I just checked my truck and there is a 20 degree difference between the outer housing and my temperature gauge, which I'm pretty
sure is close. I'll check the goat later.
Edit- The goat checked 171 degrees with the gun at the housing, which would be about 190 degrees, if the temperature differential is the same as the truck, so maybe I'm good.
You can also shoot the radiator at different points - you may find a hot/cold spot that could indicate blockage or poor flow which will affect overall cooling.

You should also see a difference between the top of the tank and the bottom as the hot coolant enters and is cooled through the radiator and back into the engine.

If you have not already added the water wetter, I'd add it to see if there is a difference.

Factory gauges are not always as accurate as we would like them to be. :thumbsup:
 

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I was going to use it once, but didn't. From reading about it, it seems to work best with plain water. I live in the northeast and have antifreeze in all my cars. I didn't want to change out the water at the end of the driving season and put antifreeze in. If I lived in a warmer more seasonable climate, I would try it. Got nothing to lose, Nicholas.
 

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I’ve had good results with water wetter. Its not a cure all for over heating and doesnt work miracles but it have seen a drop in temp on the cars i’ve used it on.

The premise is pretty simple. It gets rid of the tiny air bubbles along the cooling passages inside the block. No bubbles means more surface area for the water/coolant to extract more heat.

It has different levels of effectiveness based on the water to coolant/antifeeze ratio.
 

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I live in Texas where summer heat gets to everything! I tried it first in my GTO with good results. Now I run it in the family van, farm truck and the tractor too. It really does help bring down operating temperatures.
 
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