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RIP (12/27/60-7/18/15)
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Discussion Starter #1
I finally got my stud set to mount my windage tray.
Both are Milodon.
the front part of the oil pan is hitting the front studs.
and the nuts the tray rests on are all the way down.
Ther is less than an inch of stud sticking out the top of the tray.
This keeps the front of the oil pan an inch above the block :eek:
NOW WHAT??????????
thank you
 

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The windage tray is held on with grade 8 bolts. Use locktite red and torque to 15 ft lbs.

Did you swiss cheese your windage tray with about twelve 1/4" holes? This really helps oil drain back to the pan.

What type of gasket are you going to use on the oil pan on the back part of the oil pan to rear main cap? I like the square cork type. I like to wrap it around a small can overnight to take a round shape. Then I glue it on with Permatex High Tack sealant. The red stuff in white bottle comes with a brush on the cap. I also use this on the pan rail side gaskets to block. Then I coat the gaskets with a small amount of RTV sealant before putting the pan on. Once the pan is bolted on leave it for 24 hours.
 

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RIP (12/27/60-7/18/15)
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767 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
GRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
according to the tech at milodon I have a couple options.
Buy a big high cap milodon oil pan.(as the stock trays ALWAYS hit the after market studs.Guess I didnt read that part.Nor did I see it.) for $300.
Or cut the front studs as short as I can and beat dents in the pan with a hammer and a socket, which may or may not work.
The high cap pans look real sharp.
Does anyone out there have a Milodon hi cap pan on their 67 Goats?
Do you guys think there will be a problem clearing the cross member in the frame?
thanks.
ps GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR lol
 

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The windage tray is held on with grade 8 bolts. Use locktite red and torque to 15 ft lbs.

Did you swiss cheese your windage tray with about twelve 1/4" holes? This really helps oil drain back to the pan.

What type of gasket are you going to use on the oil pan on the back part of the oil pan to rear main cap? I like the square cork type. I like to wrap it around a small can overnight to take a round shape. Then I glue it on with Permatex High Tack sealant. The red stuff in white bottle comes with a brush on the cap. I also use this on the pan rail side gaskets to block. Then I coat the gaskets with a small amount of RTV sealant before putting the pan on. Once the pan is bolted on leave it for 24 hours.

The windage tray from the factory has bolts, not studs. Read what I wrote.
 

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I think I'd grind the studs off and dent the pan first before I spent $300+ bucks for another part!!

After grinding place a dab of grease on each stud, then install the oil pan. Remover the pan and check for clearance by verifying the grease doesn't transfer to the pan from the studs.
 

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RIP (12/27/60-7/18/15)
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767 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The front of the tray hits the pan even with the bolts out.
Im starting to see why most of the windage trays are 3/4 lenght
 

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Most engines don't even use windage trays. Worse case, just leave it out. My 76 400 didn't have one, while my 350 did. The motor in the pic is a 69 and has the tray.
I was thinking the stock tray mounted to the caps, and here's a pic of mine. Are your main caps drilled? You could just drill the windage tray and mount it like a stocker.
 

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Do not use studs!!!!

Studs will crack and break at the tray.

Use GRADE 8 Bolts with red locktite torque to 15 ft lbs

You should be able to modify the front of the tray so it does not hit the pan.
 

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there is also a reason the pan is shaped the way it is. if you get a pan that will clear all your new stuff it will probably hit the crossmember in your car and not go all the way down.
 

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RIP (12/27/60-7/18/15)
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Discussion Starter #12
Th e tech at The Parts Place swears that even if I did by the hi cap milodan pan it still wouldnt fit, I returned the studs, bought a good used 3/4 tray and should be good to go.
Sure glad I didnt spend 300.oo on a freakin oil pan!!!!
 

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Th e tech at The Parts Place swears that even if I did by the hi cap milodan pan it still wouldnt fit, I returned the studs, bought a good used 3/4 tray and should be good to go.
Sure glad I didnt spend 300.oo on a freakin oil pan!!!!
Sounds like the best option for you. I wish I'd been able to jump on this thread right when it started, I might have been able to save you some pain. I'm running one of those Milodon trays, but only because I have to. There's no way the factory tray would have cleared my stroker crank. I'm also running a Mildon pan - but even with all that I still had several problems getting everything fit correctly. I wound up using bolts instead of studs on the front main cap due to the same clearance issues you had - even with a Milodon pan. I'm also using bolts on the #3 main because of a different problem with the Milodon studs. I also had to modify the tray itself to get it to clear the crank.

As far as whether a tray is "needed" on the street, that's really a personal choice. There's no question that having a windage tray will make a difference on your time slip. Keeping that mass of whirling oil away from the crank prevents it from robbing power that would have otherwise been available to move the car is just a fact. The question becomes whether or not it's worth it to you to "do what you have to" to properly fit one. For me, the answer was yes.

Here are some shots of what my installation looks like.






Bear
 
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